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American Museum of Natural History
Natural History Museum
Today 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
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We’re celebrating Museum Week with a peek back at the before-and-after of one of the Museum’s mammal dioramas. The image of preparators working on the Siberian tiger diorama was taken in 1934. Today, the tiger diorama is still a highlight of the Museum’s Hall of Asian Mammals. Learn more about Siberian tigers. http://bit.ly/1bBQkFY
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Great photos and interesting presentation!
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Curator of Micropaleontology Angelina Messina found beauty and wonder in some of the Museum’s tiniest specimens. She joined the staff in the 1930s, and with the help of Assistant Curator Eleanor Salmon, prepared catalogs of foraminifera—miniscule organisms that provide important markers to geologists and hold vital records of ancient climates within their fossilized chambers.

This March, we’ll be profiling women in science across the Museum. Read more: http://bit.ly/1Oy6lfo
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The okapi diorama holds a secret unknown to most visitors. Foreground artist George Frederick Mason collaborated with James Perry Wilson on this diorama, and knowing how Wilson loved riddles and puzzles, Mason painted a hidden chipmunk into the background painting and challenged Wilson to find it. The whimsical little creation remains in the background today, scampering across the African forest floor in full view of the public.

Today we kick off Museum Week! Follow along on Twitter all week and stay tuned for more little-known Museum facts: http://bit.ly/1HpxD1X
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In today's New York Times, Karole Armitage recounts her early exposure to the natural world, "starting at about age 13, I would hike straight over the mountain to go to Aspen, where Ballet West had a summer residency," Ms. Armitage said recently at her TriBeCa apartment. "I would stay there for three weeks and hike back. That's the crazy way I grew up." Read the story: http://nyti.ms/1O9nyeY

Later this month, the award-winning Armitage Gone! Dance Company, led by founder and Artistic Director Karole Armitage, will premiere their piece On the Nature of Things in the Museum's Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. The dance, accompanied by narration written and performed by biologist Paul Ehrlich, was inspired by Dr. Ehrlich's writings on climate change and created specifically for the hall, incorporating iconic exhibits like the polar bear diorama. Learn more and purchase tickets: http://bit.ly/1AJUyRL
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Just had to look up the "TriBeCa apartment" reference out of idle curiosity...    That my friends IS the definition of insanity!   $51 MILLION for a hole in the wall.    <smh!>
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Tickets now on sale! http://bit.ly/1DbWGaX
The award-winning Armitage Gone! Dance Company, led by founder and Artistic Director Karole Armitage, will premiere their piece On the Nature of Things in the Museum’s Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, March 25-27.
The dance, accompanied by narration written and performed by biologist Paul Ehrlich, was inspired by Dr. Ehrlich’s writings on climate change and created specifically for the hall, incorporating iconic exhibits like the polar bear diorama.
The result is a one-of-a-kind performance that explores the issue of climate change—and the loss of biodiversity that accompanies it—in a cultural context to illuminate the complex relationship between mankind and the natural world.
“It’s really talking about how a change of consciousness is necessary for humans to adapt to what is happening,” says Armitage. “It’s a meditative essay, scientifically and also artistically.”
Read more on the Museum blog: http://bit.ly/1EfGtPA
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In 1969, a two-ton meteor broke up in the atmosphere above the Mexican village of Allende. The stony Allende meteorite is peppered with small amounts of stardust, known as presolar grains. These particles are about the same composition as the Sun, and are believed to be remnants of the first solid grains that formed in the solar system. Dated to 4.566 billion years ago, they are its oldest known objects.

Follow us @AMNH on Twitter for more Museum Week facts!
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Wow
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Join us tonight as the award-winning Armitage Gone! Dance Company, led by founder and Artistic Director Karole Armitage, premieres their new work On the Nature of Things in the Museum’s Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. The dance, accompanied by narration written and performed by biologist Paul Ehrlich, was inspired by Dr. Ehrlich’s writings on climate change.

The work is a one-of-a-kind performance that explores this environmental crisis—and the loss of biodiversity that accompanies it—in a cultural context to illuminate the complex relationship between mankind and the natural world.

“Art is a wonderful medium to attract people to science,” said Museum Curator Rob DeSalle.”It’s important to have that different perspective. A piece like this can really help to personalize issues like climate change.”

Tickets are still available for performances tonight, Thursday and Friday, but advance purchase is encouraged: http://bit.ly/1NgzJTS
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“I went to Africa…for just the same reason that lots of girls settled down on Main Street back home—just to be with my husband,” explorer and filmmaker Osa Johnson was once quoted as saying in an article called “A Wife in Africa.” 

But Johnson, who was also billed as “The Heroine of 1,000 Thrills,” and “the greatest woman explorer” didn’t just play the rule of dutiful assistant to her adventurer husband, Martin. As a team, the Johnsons led expeditions around the world in the 1920s and 1930s, producing 14 feature films, 37 educational shorts, and dozens of filmed lectures. Several of these pieces were commissioned by the Museum and presented to sold-out crowds as part of fundraising efforts for the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. Prints of some of the Johnsons’ films, including the 1928 Simba, King of Beasts, are held in the Museum’s archives. 

Learn more about women in science: http://bit.ly/1C5I5e7 
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Amazing 
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New Research: Study Sheds Light on Mammal Group that Puzzled Darwin
Charles Darwin called them the “strangest animals ever discovered” when he found these mammals’ fossilized remains nearly 200 years ago. Now, new research led by the Museum, the Natural History Museum in London, and the University of York shows that South America’s so-called “native ungulates”—the last of which disappeared only 10,000 years ago—are related to mammals like horses rather than elephants and other species with ancient evolutionary ties to Africa.
“Fitting South American ungulates to the mammalian family tree has always been a major challenge for paleontologists, because anatomically they were these weird mosaics, exhibiting features found in a huge variety of quite unrelated species living all over the place,”said Ross MacPhee curator in the Museum’s Department of Mammalogy and one of the authors of the study, which is published this week in the journal Nature. “This is what puzzled Darwin and his collaborator Richard Owen so much in the early 19th century.”
Read more about these new findings: http://bit.ly/1FdHGd7
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Great article and wonderful information. Thanks for the insight 
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Today’s ‪#‎ThrowbackThursday‬ is taking a step back into the past. “Boy seated in dinosaur tracks exhibit” was taken by Robert Elwood Logan and Alex J. Rota in 1959.
The Glen Rose Trackway is a 107-million-year-old series of fossilized dinosaur footprints. Excavated from the bed of the Paluxy River in Texas, the trackway gives a picture of dinosaurs that in some ways is more striking than that offered by fossils. Learn more about The Glen Rose Trackway: http://bit.ly/1H4tnop   
AMNH/326554
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I want to see this in person. Looks like we'll be vacationing in Texas in the future! 
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New exhibition trailer!
Over billions of years, living things have evolved from simple cells into an awe-inspiring array of life forms—a spectacle of behaviors, specialized parts, and exacting skills. Some species are familiar. But others are so amazing that they test the limits of our imagination.
Life at the Limits: Stories of Amazing Species opens April 4: http://bit.ly/1BQKsBi
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Happy ‪#‎TrilobiteTuesday‬!
The Trilobita, an extinct class of Paleozoic marine arthropods, was made up of 10 orders, over 150 families, about 5,000 genera and over 20,000 described species. Browse hundreds of images of the various species on the Museum’s trilobite website: http://bit.ly/1FxvW4b
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Cool

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Central Park W & 79th St New York, NY 10024
Central Park West & 79th StUSNew YorkNew York10024
(212) 769-5100amnh.org
Natural History Museum, Planetarium
Natural History Museum
Planetarium
Imax Theater
Science Academy
Sculpture Museum
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Today 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
Monday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmTuesday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmWednesday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmThursday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmFriday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmSaturday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmSunday 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
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13 reviews
From dinosaurs to outer space and everything in between, this huge museum showcases natural wonders.- Google
"Amazing special exhibits as well as great permanent exhibits."
6 reviewers
"Do not miss the dinosaur fossils, planetarium, and ocean life!"
2 reviewers
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Iain McGinniss's profile photo
Iain McGinniss
a month ago
This is an amazing museum, and it is pretty much impossible to see it all in a day. I loved the biodiversity and sea life exhibits, and the space exhibit has some mind blowing visual aids to explain the scale of the observable universe.
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Becky Curran
a month ago
This is a fun museum to go to on a cold and rainy day. I recommend checking out Nature's Fury: The Science of Natural Disasters. I learned some interesting facts from earthquakes and volcanoes to tornadoes and hurricanes.
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Jemma Beltz
a month ago
When I lived in CT my dad worked in NY so we would take trips to the museum. They were AMAZING, there were things for me to do and we could explore all the exhibits. My dad would explain everything I didn't understand. Just glancing at even only ONE exhibit can change your point of view on the way you see life.
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Kmbe Anne
3 months ago
I LOVE this museum! It is huge and there is so much to see and do! I allowed myself 6 hours on my visit and was rushing most of the time to get through to see as much as I could. In addition to covering the grounds, we also saw 4 shows/exhibits. I didn't get to see everything but I think if you split your visit into 2 days, you should be able to cover the place plus it's exhibits in a comfortable timeframe. If you can't read a map then you will find this place a little difficult to navigate. I kept track by drawing on the map as we made our way through the museum. This allows you to use your time efficiently and only covering certain areas once. Most of the employees have good attitudes here. We did encounter some grumpy folks on our visit which is expected. I enjoyed the enthusiasm portrayed by a woman who conducted a children's tour. It kept the young kids engaged. Gift shops are available throughout the grounds with beautiful overpriced souvenirs. It is very easy to waste money on nick-knack’s here. I highly recommend the Dark Universe Space Show. Not only was it fascinating but the way it is delivered in a super cool superdome added to the experience. It reminded me of the shows you watch in Universal Studios - Orlando, FL. The Pterosaurs Exhibition is geared more towards the younger children. There are many activities and games for them. The Great White Shark IMAX show was okay. It was like watching a movie in a theatre. Nothing too special. It was an interesting film though! The Nature's Fury Exhibition is an interesting walk through with a lot of information. The big, blue, humpback whale and the T-Rex fossil where some of the most beautiful displays. I would recommend this place to anyone; but come in with a plan to get the most out of your visit!
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Phillip Carros
3 months ago
This place was the biggest surprise of my trip to New York. I went first to the planetarium and watched the Neil DeGrasse Tyson movie. It was informative yet entertaining. I wish the seats had reclined just a little more. After exiting the planetarium, my group thought about what to do next. We headed up to the dinosaur exhibit and from there we were just blown away. I know I didn't expect to see the T-Rex or how large an Apatosaurus was. From there, we saw all sorts of prehistoric beasts as well as many of the exhibits on the history of humanity. Sure, I didn't like every single thing, but to be surrounded by all the human and non-human history was just mind blowing. I recommend this place to anyone looking for a good time in New York, and especially to anyone that might be skeptical about seeing it.
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Pablo Costa Tirado
3 weeks ago
The most incredible museum I have ever seen. I spent a day to see it all and even wasn't enough. The best Natural History Museum on the earth? I've been in the London one which is very good and in Madrid but I think there are not as good.
Peter M
2 weeks ago
The building is great, but the exhibits are mostly outdated mock ups made in the 1980s and reflecting the cliches of that era. You can learn more about this stuff from wikipedia than by going to this museum.
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Ivo Hop
a month ago
Everyone should go here at least once in their life. The exhibitions were really good. Take a full day though, you're not doing it justice otherwise. Deep Space was the coolest thing I've seen in a long time. I highly recommend it!