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American Museum of Natural History
Natural History Museum
Today 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
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This ‪#‎FossilFriday‬ is a Florida native!
Metaxytherium floridanum is a 12-million-year-old sea cow. The earliest known fossils of sea cows are found in 50-million-year-old marine sediments, yet even at that early stage, two groups of sea cows had already evolved—the dugongs and the manatees. Metaxytherium is an extinct dugong. Unlike manatees, dugongs lack nails on their flippers, and have a deeply notched tail fin with two pointed lobes. Throughout most of the evolutionary history of sea cows, their habitat has corresponded to the places where sea grass grows. These are primarily in tropical and subtropical coastal shoreline environments and estuaries. This fossil was collected in 1929 in Gadsden County, Florida. 
Another immense dugong species, the Stellar sea cow, survived until around the year 1800 in the waters of the North Pacific. Reaching a length of almost 25 feet (7.5 meters) and weighing about 9,000 lbs (4,000 kg), it was hunted to extinction by humans. 
See this fossil in the Hall of Advanced Mammals: http://bit.ly/1HzEBFK AMNH/C.Chesek
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Ruy Monroe's profile photoKim Brien's profile photo
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Get your ‪#‎TrilobiteTuesday‬ fix! 
Trilobites were certainly not solitary creatures. Indeed, mass mortality plates featuring dozens of complete specimens have been found everywhere from the Cambrian strata of Morocco to the Ordovician rocks of Oklahoma. 
This example of Eldredgeops milleri (named in recognition of Dr. Niles Eldredge, Curator Emeritus, American Museum of Natural History, Division of Paleontology) from the Middle Devonian and collected in Michigan features 11 trilobites that lived approximately 400 million years ago. 
More trilobites this way: http://bit.ly/1GmnLZv
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Kinda looks like coffee beans (jokes)!
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Happy birthday to Inge Lehmann, Danish seismologist and discoverer of Earth's inner core. 
Born in Denmark in 1888, Lehmann was a pioneer among women and scientists. In 1929 a large earthquake occurred near New Zealand. Lehmann studied the shock waves and was puzzled by what she saw. A few P-waves, which should have been deflected by the core, were in fact recorded at seismic stations. Lehmann theorized that these waves had traveled some distance into the core and then bounced off some kind of boundary. Her interpretation of this data was the foundation of a 1936 paper in which she theorized that Earth’s center consisted of two parts: a solid inner core surrounded by a liquid outer core, separated by what has come to be called the Lehmann Discontinuity. Lehmann’s hypothesis was confirmed in 1970 when more sensitive seismographs detected waves deflecting off this solid core.
Learn more about pioneering seismologist Inge Lehmann: http://bit.ly/1IxLDeg
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Dinah B Andersen's profile photoAlejandro M. Troya's profile photoMickey Hodge's profile photoTom Chambers's profile photo
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God's art
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This is one enormous ‪#‎FossilFriday‬!
Indricotherium was an herbivore that lived in the forests of central Asia between 34 and 23 million years ago, and is the largest land mammal ever discovered. Weighing as much as 20 tons as an adult, the equivalent of 3-4 adult African elephants, Indricotherium could stretch its long neck to nibble leaves high in the treetops of the central Asian forests. Needing to eat massive amounts of vegetation to survive, Indricotherium suffered as the central Asian forests were replaced by grassland habitats, causing this huge mammal to become extinct.
Find this massive mount in the Museum’s Hall of Primitive Mammals: http://bit.ly/1Jw9urZ
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The Cloberth's profile photoAlixandria Rowe (Alix)'s profile photoMarcos Andrés Barros Ketterer's profile photoAlma Arquero's profile photo
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It makes poor little runty Godzilla look like a newt (but not the Gingrich type)...
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Millions of people every year come to the Museum to explore our renowned natural history collections. On Saturday, May 9, though, we want to take a look at your collections during the Museum’s annual Identification Day! Pictured is an assemblage of items Museum employees are hoping to learn more about on Saturday. From backyard arrowheads to mysterious vertebrae, find out what we're bringing to ID Day: http://bit.ly/1PpwydA
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Stay far away from this enormous ‪#‎FossilFriday‬! 
Pictured are the ribs and vertebrae of Madtsoia bai, or “Cow Valley [snake]” which lived about 55 million years ago, during the Early Eocene. Some extinct snakes grew to remarkable size. This is a section from the trunk of Madtsoia, a snake whose body would have reached over 30 feet (9.2 meters) in length! In some extinct snakes, small spurs near the tail are ancient remnants of the hind limbs found in snake ancestors.
This fossil is located in the Museum’s Hall of Vertebrate Origins: http://bit.ly/1DHGHLQ
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Mickey Hodge's profile photoCauleen Auerbach's profile photoKaren beukema einstein's profile photoMuseums's profile photo
 
Damn that is all I got to say
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NEW EPISODE! Watch Shelf Life, Episode 7: The Language Detectives
Learn more about this topic: http://bit.ly/1FASGR5
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Today is International ‪#‎MuseumDay‬! 
On a day designated for celebrating Museums, we invite you to dive deep inside the Museum’s collection to discover the past, present, and future of our approximately 33 million artifacts and specimens with Shelf Life, a new series with original monthly videos. 
Watch now: http://bit.ly/1EXMtLh
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Ann Joy Ruth's profile photoKaren beukema einstein's profile photoThe Cosmos's profile photoShawna Hamner's profile photo
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Beautiful!!!!!!!
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Hey teachers! This summer, enhance your science curriculum from wherever your vacation takes you. The Museum offers online professional development programs, and graduate credit is available. 
The next 6-week session of these courses, Seminars on Science, starts May 25th with online courses including Climate Change; Earth: Inside and Out; Evolution; The Link Between Dinosaurs and Birds; Genetics, Genomics, Genethics; The Ocean System; Sharks and Rays; The Solar System and more.
Enroll by Monday, May 11th. 
Learn more: http://bit.ly/1P6l3wJ
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The American Museum of Natural History has been awarded a generous grant by Carnegie Corporation of New York in recognition of the Museum’s exemplary educational offerings for K-12 students. The one-time grant, funded as part of the Corporation’s 2015 Presidential Discretionary Grant, is one of 18 such awards to cultural institutions with distinguished educational and enrichment programs for students in greater New York City. 
“We are so appreciative of Carnegie Corporation’s significant grant to support and enrich the Museum’s educational programs for New York City students and teachers,” said Ellen V. Futter, President of the American Museum of Natural History. “This is just the latest example of Carnegie’s longstanding and visionary partnership, which has empowered the Museum to apply its extraordinary resources and expertise in innovative ways to the challenges of improving science teaching and learning in the United States.”
The Museum has long been a leader in enhancing the public understanding of science through exhibitions, programs, and educational initiatives, and a top field trip destination with more than 500,000 visitors from school and camp groups each year.  As the need for science literacy and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education has grown more urgent over the past two decades, the Museum’s educational programs have been dramatically extended to leverage its unique scientific and educational resources and advance new forms of science teaching and learning.
Learn more: http://bit.ly/1H4Htdy
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Meet the remarkable species that has come to be called “the immortal jellyfish.” These tiny, transparent creatures have an extraordinary survival skill. In response to physical damage or even starvation, they take a leap back in their development process, transforming back into a polyp.
Learn more: http://bit.ly/1dIKIuR
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York Prep School's profile photoIbrahim Alkhaligy's profile photoMarcos Andrés Barros Ketterer (MarcvsTraianvsNervaA)'s profile photoNathan Bulitta's profile photo
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It call immortal jellyfish
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Marvel came to visit the Museum’s new exhibition, Life at the Limits: Stories of Amazing Species, to get the lowdown on the “super powers” found in the animal kingdom. Curators Mark Siddall and John Sparks shared the amazing abilities of the mantis shrimp, bioluminescent shrimp, and even the cockroach!
Learn more about Life at the Limits: http://bit.ly/1bDp1uG
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Check it out!

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Central Park W & 79th St New York, NY 10024
Central Park West & 79th StUSNew YorkNew York10024
(212) 769-5100amnh.org
Natural History Museum, Planetarium
Natural History Museum
Planetarium
Science Academy
Sculpture Museum
Research Institute
Historical Landmark
Today 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
Monday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmTuesday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmWednesday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmThursday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmFriday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmSaturday 10:00 am – 5:45 pmSunday 10:00 am – 5:45 pm
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1 star
15 reviews
From dinosaurs to outer space and everything in between, this huge museum showcases natural wonders.- Google
"The IMAX is amazing, and I love the Hayden Planetarium."
25 reviewers
"Do not miss the dinosaur fossils, planetarium, and ocean life!"
2 reviewers
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All reviews
Thomas Saba
in the last week
It's such an awesome place to go to learn about our planet in general. There's so much, it takes 2 days to see it all. I leave with knowledge stuck in my head to fascinate me for the rest of the day. The only thing is the lines on the weekends are long so try to get tickets before coming. I recommend going to the gift shops also because it's 3 floors of amazement!
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Paul Santo
a week ago
While I'm checking out the Hayden Planetarium. I can go here too. I can't believe I've missed this stuff...
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Iain McGinniss
3 months ago
This is an amazing museum, and it is pretty much impossible to see it all in a day. I loved the biodiversity and sea life exhibits, and the space exhibit has some mind blowing visual aids to explain the scale of the observable universe.
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Coleman Vurbeff
a month ago
A very cool Museum! I loved the sea life exhibit along with all the animals that are frozen in their beautiful slices of their homes. This is definitely worth checking out if you find yourself with nothing to do on a cold day.
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Peter Gregg
a month ago
World class history museum. From period placed dioramas to flora and fauna exhibits, it is a wonderful place for families to visit and learn. The dinosaur exhibitions would be hard to beat anywhere with a vast array of specimens. For kids, there is a Night at the Museum booklet for them to go find some of the references in the movies. They strategically placed the Easter Island "dum dum" head in the far reaches to ensure you walk through many areas. Brilliant as there are many things to see along the way. The blue whale is a sight to see as well as the planetarium. Plan to spend a few hours marveling at everything there is to see - not the least of which is the amazing architecture. It is completely worth the suggestion admission!
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Steve Pierre
a month ago
I'm far from a museum buff, but this place is perfect for those who are very curious or would rather go bar hopping during the night than take in some culture and history. The building itself is massive, and it's not for show...there are TONS of different exhibits here, ranging from the big bang to ocean creatures, you'll find so much here. There is a suggested donation price, but don't fret, you can honestly make any donation you want here. From that point, get ready to experience all this wonderful museum has to offer. Perfect for all ages, and can easily take 3-4 hours to explore just the bare surface.
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Moshe Stein
a week ago
World-class collection with great planetarium and IMAX shows. Extensive exhibits on dinosaurs, cultures of the world, gems, and biodiversity among other things. At 1,600,000 square feet this is one of the largest natural history museums in the world so every time you come back here you'll see something new. However, some of the info is outdated. For example the map for the range of the puma in the hall of North American mammals does not take into account the Florida panther. Tip: this Museum does not charge for admission. Instead it asks for a suggested donation of $19. This is not mandatory and you could give away as little as 1 penny if need be.
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Phillip Carros
5 months ago
This place was the biggest surprise of my trip to New York. I went first to the planetarium and watched the Neil DeGrasse Tyson movie. It was informative yet entertaining. I wish the seats had reclined just a little more. After exiting the planetarium, my group thought about what to do next. We headed up to the dinosaur exhibit and from there we were just blown away. I know I didn't expect to see the T-Rex or how large an Apatosaurus was. From there, we saw all sorts of prehistoric beasts as well as many of the exhibits on the history of humanity. Sure, I didn't like every single thing, but to be surrounded by all the human and non-human history was just mind blowing. I recommend this place to anyone looking for a good time in New York, and especially to anyone that might be skeptical about seeing it.
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