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American Museum of Natural History
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From dinosaurs to deep space: science news from the Museum
From dinosaurs to deep space: science news from the Museum

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Do you know which species is the largest pollinator in the world? It's the black and white ruffed lemur! Like bees, this species feeds on nectar! It pollinates the Madagascan rainforest by going from flower to flower & transferring the pollen that gets stuck to its face.
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Ever wonder how exactly it is that fish breathe underwater? To prevent their tissues from becoming too watery, their kidneys continually drain water into their urine. Freshwater fish must actively pump salt into their systems, while saltwater fish must pump out salt.
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THIS WEEK: Join us for the #AMNHMoonDance! Uncover Museum secrets on an after-hours scavenger hunt, then dance the night away under the stars + planets at this benefit event, which supports scientific and educational endeavors here at the Museum. Tickets: https://goo.gl/2haPXG
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Teachers + students: The Museum is seeking 9th and 10th grade girls in the NYC area to apply to become Brown Scholars, a 3-year intensive focused on the intersection of computer science and science. (It’s also tuition-free!) Apply by April 15: https://goo.gl/6WisQx
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You’d be in danger of frostbite after 30 minutes in -17°F. But the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) doesn’t even start shivering until about −90°F! Well-equipped for the extreme conditions in the Arctic tundra, this mammal has a dense coat made up of many layers to keep it warm.
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The waters around the Hawaiian islands are great for sighting whales. Recent undersea mapping shows the landscape forms a shallow, protected sea in the midst of the vast ocean. That makes it a watery playpen for the calves born there! Continue exploring the seas at #UnseenOceans.
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Masses of jellies happen normally, but the world’s oceans seem to be experiencing more blooms, as the masses are called. Experts think overfishing may be one cause: many fishes + jellies compete for the same zooplankton prey. Learn more at our new exhibition, #UnseenOceans!
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“Curare” is the general term for a toxic substance made from any of several tropical trees, vines, & plants (Chondrodendron tomentosum, below). In the early 1900s, doctors used curare to aid in surgery—not realizing it only caused temporary paralysis & did not eliminate pain!
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First things first: before a whale tag can do its job, researchers have to get the (removable) electronic device applied—and make sure it stays put! http://ow.ly/CqCV30iOM85
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How can this small, blood-sucking leech help scientists get a snapshot of a forest’s inhabitants? Museum researchers have an answer: https://goo.gl/yRcQWJ http://ow.ly/i/DkWwH
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