Profile

Cover photo
Verified local business
Alexandra & Hillyfields Vets Ltd
Veterinarian
Today 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
7 followers|14,030 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

1
Add a comment...
 
A concern for our pets travelling to France. It also highlights the reason for ensuring animals from Europe have the offical paperwork - it is alwasy best to go through a reputable breeder.
1
Add a comment...
 
If your pet has gone missing, here are some things you can do:

Call the microchip database they are registered with and report them as lost or stolen. Make sure your contact details are always up to date.
Contact your local authority dog warden, via your local council – they are legally responsible for stray dogs and may well have picked up your pet. They will hold on to stray dogs for seven days but, after this time, dogs will be rehomed or put to sleep if no home can be found for them.
Contact neighbouring local authorities too as pets may move across local council borders
Call local kennels/catteries/charities – it’s possible someone has found the dog and taken them to a local rehoming centre or kennels
Contact all local vet surgeries, after-hours veterinary centres or animal hospitals – if your pet has been injured, they may have been taken there for treatment
Check online lost and found websites and notice boards in your local area. Register your dog on DogLost or any pet via www.animalsearchuk.co.uk, a free national database which is run by volunteers who will help you to search for your pet.
Put up notices/posters in your local area with an up to date clear photo of your pet. If your pet is insured, your policy may include help with advertising and reward costs.
Alert neighbours to look in their sheds/garages etc and keep an eye out via leaflets.
Don't forget the wonderful Facebook community as this is a subject that most people can relate too - and they are helpful at spreading the word.
Visit places where other dog walkers go and ask them to keep an eye out for your dog.
REMEMBER that if your pet is wearing a tag and is microchipped, this will hugely increase your chances of being reunited with them if they go missing.
1
Add a comment...
 
Over the Bank holiday weekend something to think about....
1
Add a comment...
 
Everyday sounds such as the rustling of a crisp packet or a ringing alarm clock could trigger seizures in your pet cat. This is known as: The ‘Tom & Jerry syndrome’.

Vets have found that a form of feline seizure known as ‘Tom and Jerry syndrome’, so-called because of it’s similarities to a scene in the famous cartoon, can be caused by the slightest sound.

Despite these sounds, such as a computer mouse clicking or crinkling tin foil, being seemingly innocuous they can have a catastrophic effect on your favourite furry friend if they suffer from the condition.

The sounds can cause the cat to exhibit a jerking motion and even begin foaming at the mouth, which can be very distressing for both the cat and the owner witnessing it.

The condition is very similar to that of reflex epilepsy in humans and researchers hope further studies into the feline phenomenon could help both cat and human sufferers.

U.K. veterinarians, the University College London, and International Cat Care, a cat welfare organization, are investigating this condition with the aim to help cats and it may even become useful to help people who suffer from this difficult condition.
Even deaf cats can end up unconscious after hearing the sound of crinkling tin foil, say vets
1
Add a comment...
 
Did you know, that the lungworm parasite is carried by slugs and snails?
When dogs rummage through the undergrowth, drink from puddles, eat grass or generally sniff around outside they can end up eating small slugs or snails either accidentally or on purpose.
Once a dog is infected with lungworm they can suffer from serious health problems which can be fatal if left untreated.
Lungworm infections can cause a number of different signs including:
· Breathing problems
· Poor blood clotting
· General signs of being unwell like weight loss, sickness and a poor appetite
· Depression and tiredness
We recommend regular treatments with a worming tablet or spot-on treatment that covers lungworm, especially at this time of the year. Discuss your pet's risk with your vet and we can advise you which is the best treatment for your dog.
1
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
7 people
veterinary tools's profile photo
Dog Health Guide's profile photo
Sarah Thomas's profile photo
BHvds's profile photo
Vetswest Ltd's profile photo
Tracy Edwards's profile photo
zushkhan's profile photo
 
Summer is here.........
1
Add a comment...
 
The best way to protect your garden and pets is by designing a pet-friendly garden. Raised beds and clearly designed pathways help to keep dogs out of the flowerbeds and protect the more delicate plants. For areas where the dogs (and children) will be letting off steam choose tougher more hardy plants or shrubs that can withstand a bit of battering.

Ensure your fencing is secure with no gaps or holes to prevent your dog escaping. Look at your pet’s habits too – is he a digger? If so, why not give him an area that it is ok for him to dig in and encourage him to use this area, by hiding toys or treats in it, rather than the lawn. For cats consider planting cat nip (Nepeta cataria) or cat grass that is safe for them to chew on.

The main dangers for your pet come from chemicals and fertilizers, so try and reduce your use of these products – it is better for the wildlife in your garden too. Metaldehyde (slug pellets) is the most common poisoning we see.

Some plants can be toxic to animals. Common plants that are toxic include: crocuses, azaleas, bleeding heart (dicentra), box, bluebells, broom, cyclamen, daffodils, dieffenbachia, hyacinth bulbs, mistletoe, yew, onions and rhubarb. Although most plants are not attractive to pets, puppies and kittens are especially inquisitive and dog can chew on sticks when you are pruning.

Mulches – cocoa mulch is toxic if eaten and has the same effect as chocolate.

Be careful with your compost heap as mouldy food can make your pet quite ill – ensure your dog cannot access your compost heap for a quick snack.
1
Add a comment...
 
Did you know that the law still requires your dog to wear an identification tag - it is not until April 2016 that the law requires your dog to have a microchip.
Under the Control of Dogs Order 1992, all dogs must wear a collar and identity tag in a public place. The tag must show the owner’s name and address. Dog wardens can enforce this law and fines of up to £5000 can be given by the Courts for an offence.
This does not apply to—any pack of hounds, any dog while being used for sporting purposes, any dog while being used for the capture or destruction of vermin, any dog while being used for the driving or tending of cattle or sheep, any dog while being used on official duties by a member of Her Majesty's Armed Forces or Her Majesty's Customs and Excise or the police force for any area, any dog while being used in emergency rescue work, or any dog registered with the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association.
1
Add a comment...
 
Fishing is a popular spring and summer activity and we occasionally see cases where cats have eaten bait – along with the hook. We have also seen cases where cats have stepped on hooks. If your cat has stepped on or swallowed a fishing hook – DO NOT PULL ON THE LINE. Tie the line to your pet’s collar or keep hold of the end to prevent them swallowing the whole lot and contact your vet.
1
Add a comment...
 
Summer is here nearly and our summer newsletter is hot off the press!

Please come into reception to pick up your copy - it has our Summer offers for vaccination amnesty and milbemax offer. Bit of gossip in the practice news, and useful first aid article regards heat stroke. Other articles include hyperthyroidism in cats and the benefits of regularly grooming your pet.

We are happy to email you a copy of this quarterly newsletter - so if you ask at reception the nurses can put you on our mailing list!
1
Add a comment...
 
Our pets can get eye infections and injuries just like we can, perhaps more often because of their curious nature getting them into trouble at times. Some breeds are predisposed to eye problems because of their facial anatomy. It is very important to have any irritated eye checked out by our surgery because eyes can turn bad very quickly. If a eye medication is prescribed, it is critical to follow the instructions on the label, apply the medication properly, and have the eye rechecked at the requested intervals.

Having a helper restrain the pet always makes treating eyes easier; however it is possible to administer drops and ointments by yourself if you can’t find an extra set of hands. Eyes are sensitive, and in the case of injury or infection, the pet may be photophobic (turns away from light) and painful. The good news is, after a couple of treatments, the eyes should be much more comfortable.

Always begin with the animal facing away from you. Making eye contact is a dominance display, and some dogs and cats will shy away from you just trying to look into their face. Using one hand, tilt the pet’s head upward. If they seem reluctant, leave the head horizontal with the jaw parallel to the floor. As long as the nose is not pointed at the floor, you will be able to administer the medication. Hold the tube of eye drops or ointment in the other hand between the thumb and index finger. With the palm facing away from you, use the back edge of hand along the pinky-finger to pull the eye open by gently stretching the skin above the eyebrow back toward you. Do not touch the applicator to the eyeball. Squeeze a drop or a thin ribbon of ointment according to the directions onto the eyeball. You can “break off” the ribbon of ointment on the edge of the eyelid as needed. Gently close the eyelids to coat the eye with the medication.

It is very important to repeat the ophthalmic medication as instructed by your vet. In the case of a corneal ulcer (a defect in the clear covering of the globe of the eye), your veterinary surgeon may have you apply a topical ophthalmic more frequently. Corneal ulcers can quickly progress to blindness if not treated aggressively. These patients are referred to as ocular emergencies. Work schedules sometimes prevent us from being home to treat our pets adequately when they are ill.

Your veterary surgeon may request a recheck. Be sure to follow up as requested. An eye that does not respond to treatment will only become more painful and difficult to treat, and probably more expensive if the condition deteriorates into an ocular emergency.
1
Add a comment...
Contact Information
Map of the business location
20-24 Alexandra Road Clevedon, Avon BS21 7QH United Kingdom
20-24 Alexandra RoadGBAvonClevedonBS21 7QH
+44 1275 343457alexandravets.co.uk
VeterinarianToday 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
Monday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmTuesday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmWednesday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmThursday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmFriday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmSaturday 8:30 am – 1:30 pmSunday Closed

WE ARE A FRIENDLY, HIGH QUALITY, PRIVATE PRACTICE WHO WILL ALWAYS PUT YOUR PET’S WELFARE FIRST – WHY NOT REGISTER YOUR PETS WITH US NOW??

 
WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT?
  • PROUD TO BE INDEPENDENT AND NOT PART OF A CORPORATE CHAIN 
  • HIGH QUALITY PERSONAL SERVICE TAILORED TO EVERY CLIENTS AND ANIMALS NEEDS 
  • FREE GENERAL HEALTH CHECKS FOR NEWLY REGISTERED PETS 
  • 15 MINUTE UNRUSHED APPOINTMENTS 
  • FREE 6 MONTH AFTER BOOSTER GENERAL HEALTH CHECKS 
  • EXCELLENT CASE CONTINUITY – YOU CAN ALWAYS SEE THE VET YOU PREFER 
  • INSURANCE CLAIMS PROCESSED DIRECT AND FREE OF CHARGE*                 
  • DEDICATED A&E SERVICE FOR OUT OF HOURS EMERGENCIES 
Google+ URL
People
Have them in circles
7 people
veterinary tools's profile photo
Dog Health Guide's profile photo
Sarah Thomas's profile photo
BHvds's profile photo
Vetswest Ltd's profile photo
Tracy Edwards's profile photo
zushkhan's profile photo
Write a review
Review Summary
4.9
9 reviews
5 star
9 reviews
4 star
No reviews
3 star
No reviews
2 star
No reviews
1 star
No reviews
"Great care and consideration ever since the cat is now 12 ! Totally recommend."
"...now moved to Alexandra & Hillyfields Vets for our lovely dog's future needs."
"...two other vets had not been able to resolve our dog's health issues..."
Photos
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Scrapbook photo 5
Scrapbook photo 6
Upload public photo
Your Activity
All reviews
BHvds's profile photo
BHvds
a month ago
We have had pets for years, but have never experienced such caring and professional service from all the vets and nurses at Alexandra Vets. No matter the time of day the service is always with a smile from all members of staff, advice given freely over the phone and doing there best to fit an 'emergency' appointment in at short notice. The receptionists are very friendly and always make a fuss of our dogs on arrival with treats and attention...which they love !! One of our dogs is a young golden retriever who attended the Puppy socialisation with Rob (one of the vets). We've been to many 'training' and 'socialising' classes around Bristol with various dogs, but have never found one that was run by a vet! You are not only getting the essential socialisation for your young dog, but also getting reassured as owners with training techniques and any behavioural queries. In our minds this is the only choice for our pets, as everyone at this practice makes sure you and your pet are happy.
• • •
Richard Young
in the last week
Tim, Rob and the team have looked after our succession of rescue dogs for the last ten years - Mutt, Jeff, Perry, and Ricky. They've done this brilliantly. One was taken to Alexandra Vets to be put to sleep by a previous owner, but Rob wouldn't hear of it ('he's old, but he's not ill or unhappy'), and arranged for him to be taken in by the RSPCA in Bristol. That's where we came across him, so within a few weeks he was back at Alexandra Vets under new ownership. Rob recognised him straight away and was delighted to learn of this happy ending. This is just one example of the way in which this practice will always put the welfare of the animal first. The receptionists are all cheerful and efficient, and obviously love animals. We've been encouraged to take our current dog in for treats from them on a regular basis, so that he feels happy about going there when he really needs it. Most importantly of all, they are great at getting to the root of problems and sorting them out properly.
• • •
Jeannette Saxton
2 months ago
I went to see Rob at Alexandra vets (Clevedon) for a second opinion regarding our family pet dog who had been poorly for about six weeks. Unfortunately two other vets had not been able to resolve our dog's health issues and I was getting upset and frustrated. Rob was very patient and listened to my concerns and then managed to get to the route cause of our dogs health issues which finally made him better. Rob was very professional and caring covering all areas of our dog's health in detail. We are very happy with the service received and have now moved to Alexandra & Hillyfields Vets for our lovely dog's future needs
• • •
Anthony Kerry
2 months ago
Very approachable vets and Vetinary nurses who are compassionate and knowledgable.
Mo Griffiths
3 months ago
Our dog is a rescue dog who came to live with us nearly three years ago. We visited a few Vet's surgeries and chose Alexandra vets as they seemed very friendly and welcoming. We visit them fairly regularly as unfortunately our dog doesn't enjoy the best of health. She loves going there, adores all the staff ( and the treats they all give her!) and they make a huge fuss of her. I would recommend them as they are very thorough and efficient. I also find it useful that I can ring and receive advice over the phone and if they say they will ring me back. they always keep that promise.
• • •
Martyn Wright
3 months ago
My labradoodle is very nervous of vets after a very unfortunate experience with another practice. Rob has been brilliant with him - he fully understands his behaviour and has gained Mylos trust. He has been so patient with him, allowing him to gain confidence in his own time. They are very friendly and efficient and I wouldn't go anywhere else!!
Sue Harris
4 months ago
A friendly well run practice with sensible opening hours and always someone on the end of the phone when needed. Without their diligence, help and support over the past few years I doubt we'd still have our two elderly and poorly cats. We recommend for these reasons.
Christopher Gray
3 weeks ago
Fantastic care - our dog, Merlin, recently became very ill and Rob and his team did the very best for him to make sure that he recovered fully - He is back to bouncing around thanks to them.