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Alexandra & Hillyfields Vets Ltd
Veterinarian
Today 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
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Responsible dog owners in towns and cities are used to clearing up after their doggie friend. But what about when out on the hills or fells? It's reasonable perhaps to assume that in the wilder outdoors - as long as it's not actually left where a person is likely to step in it - dog poo can be left to degrade along side the excrement of sheep, cows, horses and ponies.

Neospora (or Neospora caninum) is a parasite found in dog faeces and cattle can become infected with this parasite by eating grass that has been fouled by dogs. Once infected, a pregnant cow is likely to abort her foetus or to produce a calf that is already infected. Infection has also been shown to give rise to a reduction in milk that's not related to abortion.
Whilst there is no risk to humans eating meat or drinking milk from an infected cow, the economic consequences of even one infection in a herd are significant.

Sheep are the intermediate host of some tapeworms whose adults live in dogs. These can cause cysts to form in the brains and muscle of sheep causing illlness and condemnation of carcases. Products used to kill sheep tapeworm have no effect on the intermediate stages of the dog tapeworms and effective control can only be achieved by worming the dogs.

So it is important to pick up that poo on all walks and don't forget that worming your dog a minimum of 4 times a year is advised.
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Last week of our great offer on Milbemax - buy 3 get 1 FREE!
Finishes 31st July - pop into our surgery to pick up your worming tablets.

Did you know that people can be affected by dog worms? This is a major reason why we recommend to worm so frequently! (And to pick up after your dog when you are out walking!)
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Interesting facts from the PDSA PAWS report -
Around 2.5 million dogs, cats and rabbits in the UK still aren’t registered with a vet, 4.5 million aren’t vaccinated and over 4 million aren’t neutered. The consequence of neglecting the health needs of pets can prove fatal. Pets that aren’t vaccinated or neutered are at serious risk of developing potentially fatal illnesses such as parvovirus, cat flu or pyometra.
When it comes to cost, nearly half of vets and vet nurses believe that the financial responsibility of looking after pets is one of the least understood aspects of pet ownership. This is particularly worrying as 17% of owners surveyed for the PDSA PAWS report said they would consider giving up their pet due to the associated costs if they became too much. This increases to 33% amongst 18-24 year old pet owners who are currently some of the most financially challenged people in the UK due to the uncertain job market.
The British Veterinary Association has a short video about this.
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The common red mite Dermanyssus gallinae are blood sucking ectoparasites that can infest chickens and turkeys. They can strike any hen house at anytime but especially during the warmer summer months. Our best advice is to keep extremely vigilant where these parasites are concerned. They can be quite difficult to spot as they come out at night to feed on your hen’s blood and hide during the day. We suggest a regular check of your birds under their wings and around their vents, however, this will not always reveal their presence as they don’t spend all their time on the bird.
There are a number of products available for the birds and also importantly, their environment. Begin using the products early in the spring to try and prevent an infestation outbreak.
If, unfortunately, you find your chickens and house are infested then you will need to carry out some additional measures and further cleaning. Your cleaning regime must be done on 2 to 3 weekends in a row; their very short lifecycle means they will return in 10 days if eggs remain in the house and they begin to hatch out.
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Ticks are still a problem at the moment with the warm humid environment. We have had a number of pets recently coming in with ticks that have been pulled off and the heads left behind in the skin!
Please consider using a tick hook to remove a tick, as they are so simple to use on cats, dogs, horses and even people!
Also don't forget to check your pets daily for ticks after they have been outside.
Is your flea treatment also treating ticks? Check the package as not all flea treatments do this. Use your flea and tick treatment monthly to be most effective.
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Can you relate to this?
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My garden has appreciated the rain the last few days. However the snails and slugs have come out in force. All over the recycling bin, on the sides of the pot plants and partying happily in my backyard! :-(

Some gardeners protect their plants from these marauders with snail pellets - so just a thought to give to those people who own pets as well.

Metaldehyde based slug pellets are among the most dangerous and common poisonings we see in dogs. Even small amounts of pellets can cause significant poisoning and severe signs can occur within an hour of consumption. Dogs that have eaten slug pellets need to be seen ASAP as rapid intervention can save their life. Signs of poisoning can include; incoordination, muscle spasms, muscle rigidity, twitching, tremors and convulsions. Intensive treatment involving heavy sedation, control of convulsions and associated life support measures is often needed.

So if you use snail pellets - make sure your pet can't get access to them. There are 'pet-friendly' ones on the market, but I have still seen cases involving these too.
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George came in last week wearing an extra bit of bling on his collar that is not very common! His dad decided that all the hours walking around trying to chase George on walks was a bit fruitless so now he has invested in a dog tracker. Gives George's dad an idea which direction George has headed off in. As George is a beagle - he follows his nose and nothing else matters! We don't see trackers here in the UK and this was one was purchased from the USA via the internet. But still it was interesting to see and George's dad has been happy with it saving his legs. http://ow.ly/i/c1MA9
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People often think rabbits are very easy to look after and that all they need to do is pop them in a hutch in the garden and feed and clean them when needed. However, this is actually very far from the truth!

Nowadays, we have a far greater understanding of what rabbits need to keep them happy and healthy. It is also important to remember that the way a rabbit behaves will depend on their age, personality and past experiences.

Rabbits are prey animals first and foremost and their natural response to a perceived threat is to often run and hide. They have a wonderful ability to interact with humans but need time and regular, gentle handling from an early age to become comfortable around humans.

Offer your rabbits’ lots of bolt holes/hiding within their home and areas they have access to. Open spaces with no protection will cause your rabbits to feel under threat. A good idea is to place the carrier inside the homing area so increase familiarity and reduce stress during vet visits.

Think about what other animals are already in your house, and whether they are a natural predator to rabbits. For example rabbits will feel scared being housed next to dog kennels or ferret enclosures! Make sure your rabbits can always escape and hide if they feel afraid.

If a rabbit’s behaviour changes or they show regular signs of stress or fear (such as frequent hiding or being aggressive to you/or other pets), they may be in pain, distressed and /or suffering emotionally. You should get your pet checked by a vet to rule out any form of illness or injury that could be causing the behaviour problem. Your vet can then refer you to a behaviour expert if necessary.
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Milbemax worming tablet offer - BUY 3 GET 1 FREE!

Protect your loved ones from the wriggly worms - intestinal and lungworm.

Available from 8th June until 31st July 2015 at our surgery.
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Teaching children how to behave around dogs is important, but you can't count on the child (or the dog) to remember the rules of safe behaviour.

The number ONE rule is simple - never leave your child alone with a dog - any dog. From the smallest to the largest, even the most friendly, cute and cuddly dogs might bite if provoked. Like humans, dogs have a level of tolerance which we must respect.

It only takes a second for a child to get hurt and you, the adult, are the one responsible at all times to put a stop to any potentially risky situations.

So watch what the children are doing -
*Kids running and shouting around a dog - shouting, runningaround and playing noisily can easily frighten a dog. Chasing a dog can also get them over-excited and the dog might nip because they think the child wants to play.
*Invading dog's space - dogs need space and they may feel threatened by having someone trying to kiss or hug them. Yes, some dogs do tolerate it, but it's safer for the child not to do it.
*Ear pulling/Eye poking - small children particularly may pull and poke at a dog. Teach your child never to do this as a hurt or worried dog might bite.
*Teasing a dog - can make it frustrated or angry enough to bite. For instance, if the dog has a toy or food, children should never try to take it away.
*Let sleeping dogs lie! Dogs can feel particularly vunerable when they are sleeping, eating or drinking. Children should be encouraged to leave tem alone at these times. Dogs, like us, need their space or they could react badly.

Owning and being around dogs has so many wonderful benefits and can be so much fun for childre - with a little foresight and research you can easily ensure that all your family are dog smart!
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We often see rabbits here - and we recommend that they are neutered. Sometimes owners are very reluctant to spay their female rabbit or castrate their male, due to concern regards anaesthetic risk.
Even a decade ago, rabbit surgery was regarded as a higher risk and many vets were reluctant to perform elective/planned surgery. Today, things are very different: advances in anaesthetic techniques and veterinary training has resulted in general aneasthetic becoming much safer, especially neutering procedures as a lower risk surgery.
However low risk surgery does not mean no risk surgery.
Surgery on any animal can have unexpected complications, including a small risk of death, but for most rabbits the risk of neutering far outweighs the the small general aneathetic risk.
Older rabbits and those in poor health do have a higher anasthetic risk - if a general aneathetic is required then you would need to be discussed with the vet both the risks and benefits.
Rabbits can not vomit - so they do not need to fasted before surgery. They should be offered food and water up until the time of surgery, and also straight after they wake up. It is often ideal for you to bring some of your rabbit's normal food and favourite greens to encourage them to eat when they are at the veterinary surgery.
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Contact Information
Map of the business location
20-24 Alexandra Rd Clevedon, Avon BS21 7QH United Kingdom
20-24 Alexandra RoadGBAvonClevedonBS21 7QH
+44 1275 343457alexandravets.co.uk
VeterinarianToday 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
Monday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmTuesday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmWednesday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmThursday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmFriday 8:30 am – 6:00 pmSaturday 8:30 am – 1:30 pmSunday Closed

WE ARE A FRIENDLY, HIGH QUALITY, PRIVATE PRACTICE WHO WILL ALWAYS PUT YOUR PET’S WELFARE FIRST – WHY NOT REGISTER YOUR PETS WITH US NOW??

 
WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT?
  • PROUD TO BE INDEPENDENT AND NOT PART OF A CORPORATE CHAIN 
  • HIGH QUALITY PERSONAL SERVICE TAILORED TO EVERY CLIENTS AND ANIMALS NEEDS 
  • FREE GENERAL HEALTH CHECKS FOR NEWLY REGISTERED PETS 
  • 15 MINUTE UNRUSHED APPOINTMENTS 
  • FREE 6 MONTH AFTER BOOSTER GENERAL HEALTH CHECKS 
  • EXCELLENT CASE CONTINUITY – YOU CAN ALWAYS SEE THE VET YOU PREFER 
  • INSURANCE CLAIMS PROCESSED DIRECT AND FREE OF CHARGE*                 
  • DEDICATED A&E SERVICE FOR OUT OF HOURS EMERGENCIES 
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"Great care and consideration ever since the cat is now 12 ! Totally recommend."
"...now moved to Alexandra & Hillyfields Vets for our lovely dog's future needs."
"...two other vets had not been able to resolve our dog's health issues..."
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Have them in circles
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All reviews
Sally
4 weeks ago
Our rescue schnauzer loves Alexandra Vets so much he tries to get in every time we walk past and whimpers with excitement as he sits waiting to fussed over by Rob, Kath or Karen. That’s impressive given that one of his early experiences there was a difficult op to remove a lump and he’s had some slightly undignified treatment for another problem (now resolved). Rob and the brilliant veterinary nurses have given us excellent advice on everything from diet to dog behaviour and his separation anxiety. After two years of care he's in fine fettle for a 12-year-old. Curly adores everyone at Alexandra Vets and we completely trust them to always do what's right for him.
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Gill Deacon
a week ago
My dog Nellie loves going to these vets. She pulls to go in every time we go near it. This is despite her having to have a tooth out there under general anesthetic and having her yearly jabs there. It's not just the treats they give her (although I'm sure that helps!), but everyone makes a fuss of her and is very caring. I wouldn't go anywhere else
Richard Young
2 months ago
Tim, Rob and the team have looked after our succession of rescue dogs for the last ten years - Mutt, Jeff, Perry, and Ricky. They've done this brilliantly. One was taken to Alexandra Vets to be put to sleep by a previous owner, but Rob wouldn't hear of it ('he's old, but he's not ill or unhappy'), and arranged for him to be taken in by the RSPCA in Bristol. That's where we came across him, so within a few weeks he was back at Alexandra Vets under new ownership. Rob recognised him straight away and was delighted to learn of this happy ending. This is just one example of the way in which this practice will always put the welfare of the animal first. The receptionists are all cheerful and efficient, and obviously love animals. We've been encouraged to take our current dog in for treats from them on a regular basis, so that he feels happy about going there when he really needs it. Most importantly of all, they are great at getting to the root of problems and sorting them out properly.
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cressida rice
3 weeks ago
Tim is a wonderful kind vet for my very old cat. Thankyou for caring for her so well.
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BHvds
3 months ago
We have had pets for years, but have never experienced such caring and professional service from all the vets and nurses at Alexandra Vets. No matter the time of day the service is always with a smile from all members of staff, advice given freely over the phone and doing there best to fit an 'emergency' appointment in at short notice. The receptionists are very friendly and always make a fuss of our dogs on arrival with treats and attention...which they love !! One of our dogs is a young golden retriever who attended the Puppy socialisation with Rob (one of the vets). We've been to many 'training' and 'socialising' classes around Bristol with various dogs, but have never found one that was run by a vet! You are not only getting the essential socialisation for your young dog, but also getting reassured as owners with training techniques and any behavioural queries. In our minds this is the only choice for our pets, as everyone at this practice makes sure you and your pet are happy.
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Mo Griffiths
5 months ago
Our dog is a rescue dog who came to live with us nearly three years ago. We visited a few Vet's surgeries and chose Alexandra vets as they seemed very friendly and welcoming. We visit them fairly regularly as unfortunately our dog doesn't enjoy the best of health. She loves going there, adores all the staff ( and the treats they all give her!) and they make a huge fuss of her. I would recommend them as they are very thorough and efficient. I also find it useful that I can ring and receive advice over the phone and if they say they will ring me back. they always keep that promise.
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Martyn Wright
4 months ago
My labradoodle is very nervous of vets after a very unfortunate experience with another practice. Rob has been brilliant with him - he fully understands his behaviour and has gained Mylos trust. He has been so patient with him, allowing him to gain confidence in his own time. They are very friendly and efficient and I wouldn't go anywhere else!!
Sue Harris
6 months ago
A friendly well run practice with sensible opening hours and always someone on the end of the phone when needed. Without their diligence, help and support over the past few years I doubt we'd still have our two elderly and poorly cats. We recommend for these reasons.