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Alexander Rogge
Attended George Mason University
Lived in Lorton, Virginia
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A partial eclipse was the extent of my Blood Moon viewing before being clouded out as the point of totality approached.
http://www.pbase.com/arshutterbug/image/155240835

I hit clouds during the last eclipse, too, but there were enough breaks between the clouds to view the entire eclipse.  This time the clouds thickened, and some rain began to fall.  I waited another two hours for any clearing, but that's the end of the effort now with less than an hour left in the sequence and daylight beginning to replace the light pollution reflecting from the cloud cover.

#BloodMoon #Eclipse
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Alexander Rogge

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The driver being passed on the right was at-fault.  That's a failure to yield the passing lane to the traffic with the right-of-way, when there was clearly plenty of time to move over into a gap in the right lane.  Anything that happened after the deliberate blocking of faster traffic was the fault of the left-lane blocker who caused the situation to escalate.  Please, keep right except to pass.

The left lane is not a fast lane, nor is it a lane for going "fast enough."  It is a lane for passing traffic to pass slower vehicles.  From the video clip, I would hold the driver who was blocking traffic partially responsible.  Instead of playing with a video camera, the driver of the lead vehicle should have signaled right and moved into the right lane, allowing the truck driver to pass and thereby diffusing any situation that was developing.  If this had gone worse, the lead driver could have been rammed and innocent bystanders may have been injured.  I see this sort of nonsense all too often, many times involving heavy emergency equipment being blocked by the traffic jams that are caused by left-lane blocking.  Please remain in the right lane unless you are actively passing another vehicle.
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Intruder star approaches a solar system

This suggests what could happen if a wandering star came near our solar system.

Of the original four planets, one is captured by the intruder star, one is ejected into empty space, and the other two have their orbits wildly disrupted.

There may be many lone planets in interstellar space, created by events like this.

This animation was created using a gravity simulation program developed by Eugene Butikov of St. Petersburg State University.

#gravity #astrophysics
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Once every hundred or two hundred years or so heavens sends us a gift, such a gift was Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein, possibly to propel civilization forward faster.

Meet Jacob Barnett, in this particular video Jacob demonstrates solving quantum mechanics degeneracy problem using permutation groups in the polynomial it is creating, from this is a short stop to more abstract notion of abstract generalization of such groups that of Motives.

Jacob was 15 at the time of making this video, and Indiana University don't know whom they have, he soon will need to be transferred (by a chauffeured limousine) to Princeton University.
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This is what the night sky is supposed to look like.
 
The Starry Night of Alamut   |   Babak Tafreshi
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100625.html

A meteor's streak and the arc of the Milky Way hang over the imposing mountain fortress of Alamut in this starry scene. Found in the central Alborz Mountains of Iran, Alamut Castle was built into the rock in the 9th century. The name means Eagle's Nest. Home of the legendary Assassins featured in the adventure movie Prince of Persia, Alamut was also historically a center for libraries and education. For a time, it was the residence of important 13th century Persian scholar and astronomer Nasir al-Din al-Tusi. Highlights include bright white stars Deneb (in Cygnus), Vega, and Altair, nebulae near the Galactic Center, and the dark obscuring dust clouds of the Milky Way also known as the Great Rift. Lights at the lower right are from small villages and the capital Tehran, over 100 kilometers away to the southwest.

#astrophotography  
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Chinese Physicists Measure Speed of Quantum Entanglement

Quantum entanglement is one of the weirder parts of quantum theory. It allows us to transmit information between two points faster than the speed of light (some rules apply). Does this transfer of information have a finite or an infinite speed?

A team of Chinese physicists have been probing that very question, and their results are pretty crazy. Learn more about it here: http://goo.gl/rA9Cl7
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' In a paper published this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, MIT researchers propose an experiment that may close the last major loophole of Bell’s inequality — a 50-year-old theorem that, if violated by experiments, would mean that our universe is based not on the textbook laws of classical physics, but on the less-tangible probabilities of quantum mechanics. 

Such a quantum view would allow for seemingly counterintuitive phenomena such as entanglement, in which the measurement of one particle instantly affects another, even if those entangled particles are at opposite ends of the universe. Among other things, entanglement — a quantum feature Albert Einstein skeptically referred to as “spooky action at a distance”— seems to suggest that entangled particles can affect each other instantly, faster than the speed of light. 

In 1964, physicist John Bell took on this seeming disparity between classical physics and quantum mechanics, stating that if the universe is based on classical physics, the measurement of one entangled particle should not affect the measurement of the other — a theory, known as locality, in which there is a limit to how correlated two particles can be. Bell devised a mathematical formula for locality, and presented scenarios that violated this formula, instead following predictions of quantum mechanics. 

Since then, physicists have tested Bell’s theorem by measuring the properties of entangled quantum particles in the laboratory. Essentially all of these experiments have shown that such particles are correlated more strongly than would be expected under the laws of classical physics — findings that support quantum mechanics. 

However, scientists have also identified several major loopholes in Bell’s theorem. These suggest that while the outcomes of such experiments may appear to support the predictions of quantum mechanics, they may actually reflect unknown “hidden variables” that give the illusion of a quantum outcome, but can still be explained in classical terms. 

Though two major loopholes have since been closed, a third remains; physicists refer to it as “setting independence,” or more provocatively, “free will.” This loophole proposes that a particle detector’s settings may “conspire” with events in the shared causal past of the detectors themselves to determine which properties of the particle to measure — a scenario that, however far-fetched, implies that a physicist running the experiment does not have complete free will in choosing each detector’s setting. Such a scenario would result in biased measurements, suggesting that two particles are correlated more than they actually are, and giving more weight to quantum mechanics than classical physics. 

“It sounds creepy, but people realized that’s a logical possibility that hasn’t been closed yet,” says MIT’s David Kaiser, the Germeshausen Professor of the History of Science and senior lecturer in the Department of Physics. “Before we make the leap to say the equations of quantum theory tell us the world is inescapably crazy and bizarre, have we closed every conceivable logical loophole, even if they may not seem plausible in the world we know today?” 

Now Kaiser, along with MIT postdoc Andrew Friedman and Jason Gallicchio of the University of Chicago, have proposed an experiment to close this third loophole by determining a particle detector’s settings using some of the oldest light in the universe: distant quasars, or galactic nuclei, which formed billions of years ago. 

The idea, essentially, is that if two quasars on opposite sides of the sky are sufficiently distant from each other, they would have been out of causal contact since the Big Bang some 14 billion years ago, with no possible means of any third party communicating with both of them since the beginning of the universe — an ideal scenario for determining each particle detector’s settings. 

As Kaiser explains it, an experiment would go something like this: A laboratory setup would consist of a particle generator, such as a radioactive atom that spits out pairs of entangled particles. One detector measures a property of particle A, while another detector does the same for particle B. A split second after the particles are generated, but just before the detectors are set, scientists would use telescopic observations of distant quasars to determine which properties each detector will measure of a respective particle. In other words, quasar A determines the settings to detect particle A, and quasar B sets the detector for particle B. 

The researchers reason that since each detector’s setting is determined by sources that have had no communication or shared history since the beginning of the universe, it would be virtually impossible for these detectors to “conspire” with anything in their shared past to give a biased measurement; the experimental setup could therefore close the “free will” loophole. If, after multiple measurements with this experimental setup, scientists found that the measurements of the particles were correlated more than predicted by the laws of classical physics, Kaiser says, then the universe as we see it must be based instead on quantum mechanics. 

“I think it’s fair to say this [loophole] is the final frontier, logically speaking, that stands between this enormously impressive accumulated experimental evidence and the interpretation of that evidence saying the world is governed by quantum mechanics,” Kaiser says. 

Now that the researchers have put forth an experimental approach, they hope that others will perform actual experiments, using observations of distant quasars. 

“At first, we didn’t know if our setup would require constellations of futuristic space satellites, or 1,000-meter telescopes on the dark side of the moon,” Friedman says. “So we were naturally delighted when we discovered, much to our surprise, that our experiment was both feasible in the real world with present technology, and interesting enough to our experimentalist collaborators who actually want to make it happen in the next few years.”

Adds Kaiser, “We’ve said, ‘Let’s go for broke — let’s use the history of the cosmos since the Big Bang, darn it.’ And it is very exciting that it’s actually feasible.”'
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Igor Siwanowicz of Ashburn, Virginia has won the 2013 Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition with his photograph of the aquatic plant Utricularia gibba.  He also took third place with his composite photograph containing Micrasterias rotata, Micrasterias sp., M. furcata, M. americana, M. truncata, Euastrum sp. and Cosmarium sp.

http://www.olympusbioscapes.com/gallery/2013/index.html
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Have him in circles
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