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"To fix government, call in the geeks"-+CNN International

"I think that government is always going to need help, and that's part of the message that we're trying to spread… government not only will need help but will become an institution that lets people help, that encourages people to help out, and has a strong connection to the citizens its supposed to serve."-+Jennifer Pahlka, in a new interview.
http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/25/opinion/pahlka-code-government/index.html

Pahlka (aka @pahlkadot) delivered a TED Talk, "Coding a Better Government," that now has over 300,000 views, between TED.com http://bit.ly/GNxxEu and YouTube

That talk and her SXSWi keynote -- which was nearly three times as long and perhaps that much better -- aren't just about +Code for America or civic coding or the impact of the Internet on society. It was about how we think about government and citizenship in the 21st century.

Jen's voice is bringing the idea of civic coding as another kind of public service to an entire nation now. If America's developer community really wakes up to help, city and state government IT could get better, quickly, as a network effect took off.

As @PaulMDavis wrote at Shareable Magazine, if the open government and open data movement is to help cities & citizens, it will need more than just "civic hackers"
http://www.shareable.net/blog/hacking-as-a-civic-duty

"To build resilient, peer-to-peer cities these precarious economic times demand, these conversations and collaborations need to be facilitated top-down, ground-up, and between every other decentralized community node that can contribute to weaving a diverse tapestry of a city's political, cultural, historical, and socioeconomic data. …

To those of us who don't think of ourselves as hackers but find ourselves applying that ethos to other trades—journalists, community organizers, field researchers, social justice activists, lawyers and policy wonks, and many more groups—let's join the conversation, contribute our skills to the civic hacker community, and see what we can build together for our cities."

If millions of non-coders collaborate with the geeks amongst us, learning from one another in the process, it could transform "hacking as a civic duty" from a geeky pursuit into something more existential and powerful:

21st century citizenship in which an ongoing digital relationship with government, services, smarter cities and fellow citizens is improved, negotiated and delivered through mobile devices, social media and open data.

We live in interesting times.
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5 comments
 
Might help to have a few people who have actually read the Bill of Rights.
 
But apparently they'r hard to read. How often has internet governance had to relearn "transparency" ??
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