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A question for Google+ super front end team ( +Owen Prater +Eric Cattell +Eric W. Barndollar +Andy Hertzfeld +Kelly Ellis +Joseph Smarr )
How in the WORLD did you guys manage to take a snapshot of the page for the feedback mechanism?? I've tried all possible "hacks" I know to apply to that, and nothing seems to apply.
I've moves some elements around with css, and it get's captured. I've deleted a post in another tab after "capturing" the whole page (I assumed you fetch the page on the server side somehow and make a base64 image) and it still appears in the image although this post is already gone.
Nothing comes to mind on this!
Please Please tell us! :D
If it's a secret, maybe just point in the right direction.

Frustrated Front End Developer
(frustrated because the code is obfuscated and there's no way of finding out and learn from it)
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Alex Wolkov (Altryne)'s profile photoKenny Yuan's profile photoYoko Ogawa's profile photoDennis Alexander's profile photo
11 comments
 
Ok so preliminary testing shows :
- Feedback is unified throughout google servies, so not only for Google+ (youtube has this since atleast 2010)
- Works without plugins in Chrome (still no idea how)
- Falls back to flash to some degree in other browsers (I checked FF,flashcanvas.swf is involved)
 
I think we send gnomes to your house who can travel at the speed of light and use a digital camera to take a pic and send it back to Google. (Actually, I have no idea how it works, but it has to be some form of magic. :))
 
I could have sworn that I saw a flash that I didn't know how it got there...
Btw adding +Elliott Sprehn (as he's working on the google feedback team) which I have now realized is a totally different product not related to google+
Elliot please shed some light on this!
 
I like the gnome idea, we should really explore it. We do this with an HTML rendering engine written in JS so it's all client side. Similar in spirit to http://ajaxian.com/archives/crazy-times-rendering-html-in-canvas but of course much more complete. Flash is used to emulate canvas in browsers that have bugs in their HTML5 canvas implementation (or none at all).
 
Nice script, I am waiting for an open source sample for this feedback magic
 
Nice discussion. I'm also interested in JS DOM screenshot
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