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Alex Noriega
8,294 followers
8,294 followers
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"Outset"

Waves crashing into a sea cave in Olympic National Park, Washington at sunset. Consider joining Alex Mody and I on a tour this September to photograph rugged coastal scenes such as this!

This image is comprised of three exposures, due to dynamic range and shutter speed considerations: one for the cave/rock, one for the sky, and one for the water - though it could have been done in one. I've been shooting this composition for three years now, since I found this cave on my first visit to ONP - and finally the tides and sunset light aligned on my most recent visit. I was never really happy with the previous sunrise rendition you may have seen from me, as the light was very flat, even if the color was there.

www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"The Two Towers"

A unique view of the tufa formations of Mono Lake, California under stormy skies at sunset.

Since the water level here has dropped in the past couple of years, compositions incorporating water or reflections are much harder to come by. This left me looking for a frame for these strange towers, and this was what found. I thought the curling wave formation of the foreground, along with the stormy skies, looked pretty SPOOKY.

This image is comprised of several stacked exposures for depth of field at f/22 for the foreground frame (it was mere inches from my lens), one for the main formations at f/11, and one at f/8 for the sky.

For information on processing instruction, workshops, and prints, visit www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Solaire"

A grossly incandescent afternoon on the dunes of Death Valley. Praise the sun!
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"14,505"

Here's another new image - a telephoto view of Mount Whitney, California during a stormy sunrise. Whitney is the tallest peak in the lower 48 states, at 14,505 feet.

For information on processing instruction, workshops, and prints, visit www.alexnoriegaphotography.com.
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"Darkwave"

Here's a new image from last month: sand dunes in Death Valley, California at dusk. Apparently I haven't posted in 50 days - life has been busy with private workshops, and relocating to LA with my girlfriend Brittany. This means you'll be seeing more southwest work from me now, though I'll still be back up to the northwest a few times a year for shooting and tours!

For information on processing instruction, workshops, and prints, visit www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Arclight"

Brilliant sunrise light illuminates fresh snow at Oregon's Crater Lake.

This is an image I've been waiting years to make. Since first arriving in Oregon a few years back, Crater Lake has been one of my favorite locations, and I've gotten to know it quite well through my many visits - so I knew exactly what I was looking for. When I saw two new feet of snow in the forecast, I adjusted my plans to be here and shoot the day after. For Crater Lake, two feet is a laughable amount, given that it typically receives closer to 50 feet of snowfall per year - but it was enough to make it appealing in an otherwise dismal winter for snow levels here in the Pacific Northwest.

Winter here is beautiful, but it presents its challenges: one can only drive as far as Rim Village on the south rim, and all the best spots that allow one to really incorporate Wizard Island are found on the west rim. This means snowshoeing for miles is a necessity. This wouldn't be such a huge deal, except the best light is at sunrise - meaning you're either camping overnight in the snow, or getting up at 4am. 

I chose the latter option, and for the entire second half of the two-hour trek, the sky was already burning pink and red. This motivated me to get the hike done quicker, and I arrived at the end of the red stages of sunrise, as the light started to become orange. Given that the snowpack was 10+ feet lower than it should have been this time of year, my planned compositions weren't 100% ideal, since it was tougher to get above the trees - but I think I still made it work. I'm sure I'll get asked why I didn't include the rest of the lake on the left - well, for one, it's rather empty; two, there's a rock wall and some fairly unappealing trees just out of frame to the left; and three, I'd be unable to nail down the composition in-camera (I tend to avoid panos/stitches for this reason). 

I chose this particular spot/composition because of the clear views of Mount Scott and Garfield Peak, the elevation above (and proximity to) Wizard Island, the foreground snowdrifts, and the space to allow the trees to cast shadows on the snow. This is the closest spot that I knew would satisfy these requirements, and it was 5-6 miles round trip. I'm not one to regale my audience with exaggerated tales of the difficulty involved in getting a shot, but 5+ miles snowshoeing with frequent elevation change feels more like 15 miles backpacking in the summer - and I had to do it on 2 hours of sleep. Worth the nausea and soreness the next day!

A bit of tech info: this is mostly a single exposure, with some of the brightest highlights around the sun recovered from a darker bracketed exposure. The sunstar/flare is natural - I've found shooting Nikon's newer lenses at f/11 to f/16 will often produce more interesting results than the "traditional" f/22 sunstar.

For information on processing instruction, workshops, and prints, visit www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Surgerunner II"

Intensely red sunset afterglow permeates low fog, as giant waves recede on the incredible sandstone formations of Oregon's Cape Kiwanda.

I recently found myself here for about the dozenth time. While similar compositions have been shot here before (see Ryan Dyar's excellent image that initially inspired me to check out this spot a few years back), I'm not going to turn down shooting it again with atmospheric conditions like these coinciding with the proper tides.

For information on processing instruction, workshops, or prints, visit my website: www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Bolero of Fire"

One of the many streams that wind through Logan Pass, Glacier National Park, Montana, as seen during an explosive autumn sunrise. I shot this the same morning as my previous image "Prelude of Light".

I've still got a massive backlog of images to process from the latter half of 2014 - one more down, dozens to go! This image also concludes my series of six titled after Ocarina of Time melodies. NOW where will I find my titles?

For information on processing instruction, workshops, or prints, check out my website: www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Float On"

The "Cathedral Group" of peaks in Wyoming's Teton Range, capped by Grand Teton at 13,775 feet, glow through the fog on a moonlit winter night. This was shot from the Snake River Overlook made famous by Ansel Adams - an example of how something different can still be done at iconic locations.

For information on workshops/tours, processing instruction, and prints/licensing, visit my website: www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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"Vermillion Veins"

Incredible otherworldly sandstone formations in a very remote area of northern Arizona, at morning twilight. 

I've been wanting to get out here for years, having been inspired by others' images of this seemingly alien landscape. There are many locations in the American southwest where taffy- or candy-like formations can be found, but I still haven't seen anything that compares to the combination of sharp folds and color contrasts of this particular geologic marvel, so adeptly showcasing the forces of time.

Although it was a great time coming out here with my friends Joe and Scotty, crushing the notoriously rough 4x4 roads with ease in our monster of a vehicle, we arrived with only an hour to scout before sunset, and only stayed one night. Therefore, without much time to find something 100% unique, I chose to shoot the formations that interested me most, despite knowing they'd been photographed before. Additionally, with nary a cloud in the sky, I wanted to focus on areas that had an abundance of visual interest in the land portion, which would be complemented well by featureless or starry blue skies. Hopefully my interpretation is able to stand on its own. I know I'll be back here again, as the photographic possibilities are endless.

www.alexnoriegaphotography.com
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