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Alexander Moseley, PhD
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Challenging Beliefs to Change our Lives
Challenging Beliefs to Change our Lives

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Why our beliefs matter

We enter the world with barely a belief in the world but soon we pick up so many that our heads become confused. Quietly, we close down our critical faculties to agree with what we’re told, to humbly accept the opinions of those around us, as if they had incredible insight into our nature and purpose, to be subtly channelled by political and commercial purposes not of our making.

In the next month or so (July 2017), I’ll have finished a new book – a philosopher’s guide to life and how we can challenge our beliefs to live life better.

We have beliefs about everything: about who we are, what we should be doing, what the world is like, what life is all about; then we have petty beliefs about things such as whether blue suits me or not, what the weather will be like, and what film to watch this weekend.

When we’re young, our minds are impressionable and they take up a lot of inconsistent and contradictory beliefs. Some we may generate ourselves, others from parents or our schools. Rarely do we learn the tools to think about what we believe. They tend to hang around, sometimes stirring us, sometimes annoying us. Have you ever written down your beliefs? Have you ever compared or thought about how they work together – or not?

The book’s about that. Philosophers love to challenge beliefs – to stir thoughts and to create transient confusion so that the mind demands a resolution.

Say you have a niggling contradiction about two ideas. Put them together to have a head-to-head: it’s a really good exercise. Like two warring parties, contradictory or inconsistent beliefs can be brought together, witnessed and understood, and then either one or both can be rejected, or a compromise sought.

Say you want to become a great artist, but your friends and teachers put you off. “Don’t give up the day job!” But the passion burns brightly that there’s an artist within. Compare the beliefs – “I want to be an artist,” with “I believe other people have a better insight into me than I do.” Immediately the latter sounds strange. But what about, “I believe they can see my lack of skills”? Now we can compare the desire with the skill set: “I am capable of learning the skills” versus “I am incapable.” The former wins – and if it doesn’t, other inconsistencies remain to be purged!

Everything that passes through our minds is capable of being stopped – and considered. “What are you?” “What is your purpose?” “Are you a beautiful or ugly though?” “Do you have meaning?” “How do you sit with your friends?” “Do I need you?”

Rather than remaining an academic exercise, a thorough review of beliefs can really help rid our minds of some of the mental rubbish we collect!

After posting this on my website - the book is complete and in the hands of my editor. It should be published August 2017.
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Is capitalism morally corrupt - or does is just reflect the human condition?
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The Great Bison Spirit

Is the American Government morally justified in it's actions?

On October 28th, the Tatanka Oyate (Buffalo Nation) was seen coming over a hill near the Dakota Access Pipeline protest in North Dakota. This was a sign from Wakan Tanka (Great Spirit). We need to acknowledge and support the Sioux's sovereign right to protect this land and sacred grounds.

"The DAPL is a pipeline which was supposed to run north of Bismarck until it was deemed too dangerous for their water supply. As a result, it was moved just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on sacred grounds. These grounds are the tribe's equivalent of the Arlington Cemetery. I have visited both of these sacred sites and will tell you they are one in the same. Not only that, but these are unceded lands taken from the tribe in violation of 1851 treaties which declare them to be Sioux land."

#StandingRockDakotaAccessPipelineOpposition #standingrock #dakotaaccesspipelineprotest
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Isn't capitalism morally corrupt? An answer to a friend
"How far do you extend the logic before some kind of intervention is justified though? Should banks be allowed to freely collude with one another to artificially manipulate the LIBOR rates, for example? Capitalist organisations have proven time and again th...
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The beauty of dinosaur names: home education.
Can you say, "Coelophysis, children?" I've become a great fan of palaeontology ever since my elder got into dinosaurs. Well, we didn't just 'get into dinosaurs', we got into dinosaurs . We bought many basic books on dinosaurs (we have a shelf full) but we a...
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A lovely view - books! And why books mean freedom.
Here's an image of a corner of my library that took my fancy yesterday. I love electronic gadgets as tools for writing, communication, and business and the odd bit of reading the the Kindle but seriously nothing beats a good book. I'm
a serial bibliophile....
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Symptoms of being plugged in: TV and gaming
​Based on conversation with a pupil early...then developed into something wider. With one to one
tuition, my practice often runs like a doctor's office. Funnily enough, I
explained to my pupil, I am a doctor (PhD in philosophy). People come
in with simil...
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What next: school undermines our ability to choose so how do we learn to make a true decision?
One of the biggest issues we deal with in young people as they finished their exams is the sudden realisation that they are gaining control over their life - its direction and importance. Not all 16-18 year olds realise this, and many adults have yet to rea...
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Should rubbers or erasers be banned in schools?
In an article in May 2015, a cognitive scientist argued that rubbers (erasers) should be banned from the class room. As reported by the Daily Telegraph: "Guy Claxton, visiting professor at Kings College London, has sparked
arguments with his comments that ...
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