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Alaskan Nature
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Alaskan Nature- Explore the wonders of Alaska nature!
Alaskan Nature- Explore the wonders of Alaska nature!

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Alaska's indigenous people, who are jointly called Alaska Natives, can be divided into five major groupings: Aleuts, Northern Eskimos (Inupiat), Southern Eskimos (Yuit), Interior Indians (Athabascans) and Southeast Coastal Indians (Tlingit and Haida). These groupings are based on broad cultural and linguistic similarities of peoples living contiguously in different regions of Alaska. They do not represent political or tribal units nor are they the units Native people have traditionally used to define themselves.
http://www.alaskannature.com/natives.htm
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Alaska Marten
The Pacific marten is found only in the western US and the Pacific coastal islands of Vancouver, Queen Charlotte, Admiralty, and Kuiu. Within Alaska, there are two known island populations where the Pacific marten occurs. One is found on Kuiu Island and the other on Admiralty Island. Kuiu Island’s population is unique because this is currently the only known island in Alaska were populations of both the Pacific marten and American marten are hybridizing. Like the American marten the Pacific marten is found in forested habitats. It is most often associated with mature and old-growth evergreen forests.
Alaska Weasel: Marten
Alaska Weasel: Marten
alaskannature.com
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Wolverines are found primarily in the more remote areas of mainland Alaska and on some islands in Southeast Alaska. Wolverines are better adapted for scavenging than for hunting and are opportunistic eaters. On rare occasions, wolverines may kill moose or caribou
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Mountain goats are found in the rough and rocky mountain regions of Alaska, throughout the Southeast and along the Coastal Mountains of the Cook Inlet. Populations are generally confined in the areas of the Chugach and Wrangell Mountains. Mountain goats have been transplanted to the islands of Baranof and Kodiak, where they have maintained a steady population. The mountain goat is the only representation in North America of the goat-like ungulates. They constantly migrate to different areas from the alpine ridges in the summer, and to the tree-line in the winter.
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Alaska leads states in well-being!
When it comes to well-being, Alaskans nabbed the top spot in the United States, according to an annual ranking. The 2014 rankings, released Thursday, are based on over 176,000 phone interviews with people in all 50 states. The Index measures how people feel about and experience their daily lives, and looks at their health across five categories: purpose, social, financial, community and physical.

Over the past seven years, Alaska has ranked in the top 10 four times. And Alaskans are having a good year for a reason, according to Dan Witters, research director of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.

"They do a lot of the blocking and tackling, as far as taking care of themselves and making good choices, but also demonstrating good holistic well-being in ways that extend beyond the conventional physical wellness," Witters said.
http://www.alaskannature.com/
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The bald eagle of Alaska’s waterways and the soaring golden eagle of the Interior are two of this state’s most magnificent birds of prey. Long valued for their aesthetic beauty, eagles are now recognized for their biological importance as scavengers and predators in the natural environment. These raptors deserve our protection and respect.

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The bald eagle of Alaska’s waterways and the soaring golden eagle of the Interior are two of this state’s most magnificent birds of prey. Long valued for their aesthetic beauty, eagles are now recognized for their biological importance as scavengers and predators in the natural environment. These raptors deserve our protection and respect.
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James Kivetoruk Moses was born in 1900 near Cape Espenberg at the southern entrance to Kotzebue Sound. Moses spent his youth and middle years hunting seal, reindeer, and polar bear; trading furs and sled dogs in Siberia and his native Cape Espenberg on the Seward Peninsula. In 1954, when injuries from an airplane crash ended his hunting days, Moses taught himself to paint. Moses used several recurring themes in his drawings, including shamans, the advent of white men in northern Alaska, and Eskimo legends.

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Belugas are robust-bodied and have a blubber layer which can be as much as 5 inches thick. They are muscular creatures with a small rounded head, a short beak, and are quite mobile in comparison to other whales. The belugas have a narrow ridge that runs down the rear of their backs, which allows them to swim freely under floating ice. Also, the beluga is the only whale that can bend its neck. This helps them to maneuver easily and catch prey, using their 34 to 40 teeth, not for chewing, but for grabbing and tearing their prey, which is then swallowed whole. Belugas use sound to find their prey. They also use sound to communicate and navigate by producing a variety of clicks, chirps and whistles.
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Sydney Mortimer Laurence (1865–1940) was an American Romantic landscape painter and is widely considered one of Alaska's most important historical artists. His paintings of a romantic, unspoiled northern frontier  are little known beyond Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Even in Alaska, where his work is known to virtually every resident, the artist's life and early career have long been shrouded in mystery.
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