Profile

Cover photo
Alain Van Hout
Works at Foreach
Attended University of Antwerp
Lives in Antwerp
956 followers|1,335,133 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotos

Stream

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"And what we’ve seen, for the first time, is not just one of the greatest predictions of Einstein’s General Relativity, although we did just verify that. And it isn’t just that we took our first step into the world of gravitational wave astronomy, although LIGO will doubtlessly start seeing more of these signals over the coming years; this is as exciting for astronomy as Galileo’s invention of the telescope, as we’re seeing the Universe in a new way for the first time. But the biggest news of all is that we’ve just detected two merging black holes for the first time, tested their physics, found a tremendous agreement with Einstein, and seen evidence that this happens over a billion light years away across the Universe."

More than 100 years after Einstein’s relativity came out, one of its last great predictions — the existence of gravitational radiation — has been directly experimentally confirmed! The LIGO collaboration has observed two ~30 solar mass black holes merging together, producing a slightly less massive final black hole as three sun’s worth of mass was converted into energy via Einstein’s E = mc^2. This type of event, although quite serendipitous for the LIGO collaboration, is expected to occur between 2 and 4 times per year within the range of what LIGO can reach. Additionally, other types of mergers should be within the reach of what LIGO can see. Not only have we seen our first gravitational wave event, but we’re poised to truly begin the era of gravitational wave astronomy, as a new type of telescope is finally capable of seeing what’s happening in our Universe. 
Nearly 100 years after they were predicted, gravitational waves have been directly observed for the first time. Welcome to the era of gravitational wave astronomy!
6 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
via +Jim Donegan
 
Best exception handling so far.
8 comments on original post
7
Emmanuel Bourmault's profile photo
 
Nice one!
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
Don’t worry about the conventions, the runtime will let you know when you goof.

I can't say I agree, or at least not in general. Add something like field injection to the mix, and the only apparent reason for using convention seems to have evaporated.

#csharp   #startup   #convention   #interface  
2
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
This color-coded map displays a progression of changing global surface temperature anomalies from 1880 through 2015. Higher than normal temperatures are shown in red and lower than normal termperatures are shown in blue. The final frame represents the global temperatures 5-year averaged from 2010 through 2015. Scale in degree Celsius. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio.
Earth’s 2015 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern record keeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
22 comments on original post
5
1
Tjaart Blignaut's profile photoGran Dan's profile photoSteven Dunlap's profile photo
2 comments
 
Quick, someone discredit NASA and take away their funding before people start to believe the science.
.
.
.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sarcasm
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
10
Amber Peall's profile photoHesmayadi's profile photo
2 comments
 
Good quality life
Add a comment...
In his circles
169 people
Have him in circles
956 people
Richard Lucas's profile photo
Kobenan Christiane's profile photo
ashrf ayyad's profile photo
Barbra Fox's profile photo
Mohi uddin's profile photo
sankar chakraborty's profile photo
Patricia Rarinho's profile photo
Elyaqim Mosheh Adam's profile photo
Keith J Davies's profile photo

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Study made in low-and middle-income countries.
Found several versions online, this looks simple.
https://www.researchgate.net/blog/post/vaccines-save-up-to-44-dollars-to-the-dollar
This is the result of a new study, published in the journal Health Affairs. Projected vaccination rates of 94 low- and middle-income countries from 2011 to 2020 were used to determine the economic benefits.
View original post
4
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
Simple and quite useful
1
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Read your way into the library, then out of it.
1 comment on original post
12
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
" There’s a group of fossils insects that look really quite a lot like butterflies. They had broad wings with scales and pigmented eyespots. Their mouthparts were long probing straws. They likely fed from plants and pollinated them in return. They’re as butterfly-esque as it’s possible to be.
Except these creatures were flying around between 40 and 85 million years before the first butterflies existed.
They were kalligrammatid lacewings, and they were doing butterflies before butterflies even were a thing. Their resemblance is a coincidence, an extraordinary example of convergent evolution, the process two groups turn up to life’s party accidentally wearing the same outfits." excerpt from article
There’s a group of fossils insects that look really quite a lot like butterflies. They had broad wings with scales and pigmented eyespots. Their mouthparts were long probing straws. They likely fed…
2 comments on original post
5
Add a comment...

Alain Van Hout

Shared publicly  - 
 
The biggest thing you should learn from all this? That “the Big Bang” represents where everything we see in the Universe comes from, but it is not the very beginning of the Universe anymore. We can go back before this explanation is any good, to an inflationary Universe, and we have good reasons to argue over and debate the finer points of what, exactly, that means for the ultimate origin of everything we know.
 
"But did the Big Bang happen? By the first definition, yes, absolutely: the Universe emerged from a hot, dense, uniform and rapidly expanding state, and has been cooling and getting less dense ever since. But if you’re using the second definition, you may really want to rethink using the term “the Big Bang.” You won’t be the only one using it that way, but your assumptions — and your conclusions — might be completely wrong."

It’s making headlines every time someone brings it up: a quantum calculation, a new theory or some mathematical evidence proves it once and for all: there was no Big Bang. Is that even possible? Honestly, it depends on which definition of the Big Bang you’re using. As it turns out, there are two of them, and there’s a good (historical) reason for that. But in the context of what we know today, one of them isn’t a good definition anymore, and hasn’t been for decades.
When scientists say “the Big Bang,” they mean two possible things. But only one of them is still correct.
6 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...
Alain's Collections
People
In his circles
169 people
Have him in circles
956 people
Richard Lucas's profile photo
Kobenan Christiane's profile photo
ashrf ayyad's profile photo
Barbra Fox's profile photo
Mohi uddin's profile photo
sankar chakraborty's profile photo
Patricia Rarinho's profile photo
Elyaqim Mosheh Adam's profile photo
Keith J Davies's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software engineer
Skills
Java-oriented software development, scientific research
Employment
  • Foreach
    Software Engineer, 2014 - present
  • University of Antwerp
    PhD student, 2006 - 2013
  • Brunel
    Analyst - Programmer, 2013 - 2013
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Antwerp
Story
Tagline
I'm always up for a good discussion.
Introduction
I'm a software engineer with a background as a scientific researcher (biologist) and an interest in most things science. I enjoy forays into the world of programming languages and software architecture, with an affinity for development of Java-based web platforms.

I'm always up for a good discussion. And I don't mind being proven wrong, as that means I learned something new :-).

There are a couple of quotes that reflect what having a good conversation means to me; 

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
- Aristotle

you didn't come here to make the choice. You've already made it. You're here to try to understand why you made it
- The Oracle (The Matrix: Reloaded)

I'm made up of everyone I've ever met who's changed the way I think. 
- Sir Terry Pratchett
Bragging rights
Married to a sexy librarian ^_^
Education
  • University of Antwerp
    PhD study in Biology, 2006 - 2012
  • IT center VDAB Antwerp
    Enterprise Java Development, 2013 - 2013
  • University of Antwerp
    Master in Biology, 2001 - 2006
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Relationship
Married
Other names
Alain J-M Van Hout, Erinaceus