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Alain Van Hout
Lives in Antwerp
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Pop Tarts.
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Cool
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Make America on again.
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Maybe these “edge cases” are now more prevalent than when I was active, but I think the majority of the new questions are still coming from people too lazy to Google one or two different wordings of their problem.
A recent article about Stack Overflow's popularity inspired this post about a top user not contributing for years.
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Sadly, not only is the behavior seen only in captivity, but it can only be seen in captivity because the species that uses tools is extinct in the wild. Yes, it’s the Hawaiian crow, the ‘Alalā (Corvus hawaiiensis), once endemic to the Big Island but driven to extinction in the wild by the depredations of mongeese (is that the right plural?), rats, and feral cats. The birds now live only in captivity, and are being bred for eventual release.
The definition of “tool use” in animals is a bit controversial, depending as it does on whether the object is modified before it’s used as a tool. In its list of animal tool use, …
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NASA to hold press conference related to Jovian moon Europa

My guess is evidence for subsurface ocean. Tune in 1800 GMT Monday to find out.

http://phys.org/news/2016-09-nasa-reveal-jupiter-moon-europa.html
There's something going on beneath the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Europa. But what?
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Clouds.
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via +Jim Donegan
 
A bipartisan bill was passed by the U.S. Senate committee that oversees NASA space projects. The bill would allocate $19.5 billion in funds to NASA in 2017, but it has a critical mission for the space agency: send men to Mars.
A bipartisan bill was passed by the U.S. Senate committee that oversees NASA space projects. The bill would allocate $19.5 billion in funds to NASA in 2017, but it has a critical mission for the space agency: send men to Mars.
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+Larry Maxwell nah, if it had, we'd already be there by now
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You did not actually expect anti-vaxers to post something honest did you? ;-)
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A clear rule determines exactly what makes a prime: it’s a whole number that can’t be exactly divided by anything except 1 and itself. But there’s no discernable pattern in the occurrence of the primes. Beyond the obvious — after the numbers 2 and 5, primes can’t be even or end in 5 — there seems to be little structure that can help to predict where the next prime will occur.

As a result, number theorists find it useful to treat the primes as a ‘pseudorandom’ sequence, as if it were created by a random-number generator.
- Article pdf: UNEXPECTED BIASES IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONSECUTIVE PRIMES : http://arxiv.org/pdf/1603.03720v4.pdf
Maths whizz solves a master’s riddle

But if the sequence were truly random, then a prime with 1 as its last digit should be followed by another prime ending in 1 one-quarter of the time. That’s because after the number 5, there are only four possibilities — 1, 3, 7 and 9 — for prime last digits. And these are, on average, equally represented among all primes, according to a theorem proved around the end of the nineteenth century, one of the results that underpin much of our understanding of the distribution of prime numbers. (Another is the prime number theorem, which quantifies how much rarer the primes become as numbers get larger.)

Instead, Lemke Oliver and Soundararajan saw that in the first billion primes, a 1 is followed by a 1 about 18% of the time, by a 3 or a 7 each 30% of the time, and by a 9 22% of the time. They found similar results when they started with primes that ended in 3, 7 or 9: variation, but with repeated last digits the least common. The bias persists but slowly decreases as numbers get larger.
The k-tuple conjecture

The mathematicians were able to show that the pattern they saw holds true for all primes, if a widely accepted but unproven statement called the Hardy–Littlewood k-tuple conjecture is correct. This describes the distributions of pairs, triples and larger prime clusters more precisely than the basic assumption that the primes are evenly distributed.

The idea behind it is that there are some configurations of primes that can’t occur, and that this makes other clusters more likely. For example, consecutive numbers cannot both be prime — one of them is always an even number. So if the number n is prime, it is slightly more likely that n + 2 will be prime than random chance would suggest. The k-tuple conjecture quantifies this observation in a general statement that applies to all kinds of prime clusters. And by playing with the conjecture, the researchers show how it implies that repeated final digits are rarer than chance would suggest.
- read more : http://www.nature.com/news/peculiar-pattern-found-in-random-prime-numbers-1.19550?WT.mc_id=GOP_NA_1603_NEWSPRIMENUMBERS_PORTFOLIO






Last digits of nearby primes have ‘anti-sameness’ bias.
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Alain's Collections
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Tagline
I'm always up for a good discussion.
Introduction
I'm a software engineer with a background as a scientific researcher (biologist) and an interest in most things science. I enjoy forays into the world of programming languages and software architecture, with an affinity for development of Java-based web platforms.

I'm always up for a good discussion. And I don't mind being proven wrong, as that means I learned something new :-).

There are a couple of quotes that reflect what having a good conversation means to me; 

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
- Aristotle

you didn't come here to make the choice. You've already made it. You're here to try to understand why you made it
- The Oracle (The Matrix: Reloaded)

I'm made up of everyone I've ever met who's changed the way I think. 
- Sir Terry Pratchett
Bragging rights
Married to a sexy librarian ^_^
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Currently
Antwerp
Work
Occupation
Software engineer
Skills
Java-oriented software development, scientific research
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Gender
Male
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Friends, Networking
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Married
Other names
Alain J-M Van Hout, Erinaceus