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Air Facts

General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Wow. Can you imagine surviving an airplane crash like this? How about getting back into an airplane a month later? http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/miracle-mojave-surviving-airplane-crash/
At an altitude of about 50 feet, the airplane stalled and Gus lost control. Given our present situation, a team of engineers, analyzing every available factor, would be hard pressed to come up with a set of circumstances that would make this event survivable. I closed my eyes just before the lights went out.
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Air Facts

Aviation Articles/News  - 
 
Spectacular article just posted. This is the fascinating story of a 3500 mile trans-Atlantic flight in a DC-3. http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/flying-beyond-doubt-epic-dc-3-journey/
We know that mechanical things fail, people make mistakes and aviation, like the sea, is inherently unforgiving of failure or mistake. That thought was on my mind recently when we took off from Burlington, Vermont, aboard a classic old airplane, a twin engine DC-3 built in 1945. We were headed for Europe, but less than three hours later, in a flash event, both the failure and the mistake happened at the same time.
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Air Facts

Commercial Aviation  - 
 
An 18-mile trip in a lightly loaded 757 - lots of work but lots of fun too. http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/incredibly-short-haul-airline-flight/
The lady from crew sked (as always, courteous to a fault; unlike a few of the brethren who react, when called, like bears rousted from hibernation!) proceeds to acquaint me with the latest offerings from the New York catalog of 757/767 flying. Interestingly enough, the main offering for tomorrow is a 757 ferry flight from EWR to JFK. This brings back some long forgotten memories.
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Air Facts

General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Our final Christmas Special article is up - a classic story from Martha Lunken, guaranteed to put you in the Christmas spirit. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/12/martha-lunken-flying-home-christmas/
Whatever else he was, Gill Robb Wilson was most definitely the inspiration for one awkward, gawky, Midwestern teenager who wanted to be a pilot more than anything in the world. Recently I was rereading his poems and the one about Christmas in “The Airman’s World” reminded me of my best ever Christmas flight... a flight where I wasn’t even the pilot.
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ATYUI
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Air Facts

Aviation Articles/News  - 
 
Our latest Christmas special article is up! Sometimes you can't fly home for the holidays but that's the right decision. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/12/didnt-make-grandmas-merry-christmas/ 
It was December 1978, and I had been a private pilot since July 11 of the same year. Christmas would be our first trip - to Gulf Shores, Alabama, from Austin, Texas, to visit the wife’s parents and show off the four-month old baby girl.
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IAM HAV MIGREN OLL SEND MI DEFECAL THINGS
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Interesting story from a CFI who was John Glenn's flight instructor. The astronaut owned a Baron for many years. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/12/john-glenns-flight-instructor/
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Air Facts

General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Working on the line can teach you an awful lot about flying, and life. http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/confessions-former-line-boy/
You see, being a line boy teaches us how to treat people and, in turn, how we like to be treated. The fact that I can remember N222GL, N399TL, and N11LA from 43 years ago, but can’t remember what happened last week is probably more indicative of age, but also a vivid reminder of the experiences around each of these airplanes.
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Air Facts

Aviation Articles/News  - 
 
With nearly calm winds and clear skies, I taxied out and transmitted my departure intentions in the blind. From midfield I lined up on what was left of a 5000-foot runway. With the passengers’ weight, the tail wasn’t as quick to volunteer to fly first. It ended up being a three-point takeoff. This didn’t surprise me. Later in the flight was a time for surprises.
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Air Facts

General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Has the FAA actually helped pilots over the last year? Read these 5 changes and see if you agree. http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/two-cheers-faa-recent-reforms-welcomed/
Everyone likes to complain about the Federal Aviation Administration, and often it's richly deserved. But for an open-minded pilot who's willing to ignore the typical pilot talk, there are some encouraging developments in aviation policy right now. If you can find it in your heart, the folks in Washington might even deserve our thanks.
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Air Facts

Aviation Knowledge  - 
 
Dick Collins says, "To me a few spins are worth more than a thousand stalls at altitude." http://airfactsjournal.com/2017/01/arriving-vfr-sweet-spot-without-colliding-spinning/
To me, the sweet spot on a VFR approach is when 500 feet above the ground and descending toward the runway. Here, if the sight picture of the runway is correct and the configuration, speed and rate of descent are right on, the fun part, the landing, should be a piece of cake. The question is, how do you get to that sweet spot with the least possible risk?
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Practice... Practice... Practice!! Put it on the numbers! ;)
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Air Facts

Aviation Articles/News  - 
 
How about a 3000-mile Christmas flying adventure in a 150hp airplane? Oh, to be young and single... http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/12/flying-great-family-better-christmas-story/ 
The first big cross-country flight I made in a light airplane was in 1976. A college buddy and I thought it would be fun to fly from Ohio to California and back over Christmas. Being young, single, and invincible at the time, we did not think too much about what the weather might have to say about it. We departed Springfield, Ohio (KSGH) on December 20 in a borrowed 150-hp AA-5 Traveler.
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ASDFRTYUI
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Air Facts

General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Our Christmas series continues today, with this pilot report of flying through Central America for the holidays. We like a white Christmas and all, but this sounds pretty good. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/12/christmas-central-america/
On Cay Caulker, Belize, the conch shell Christmas ornaments hanging on palm fronds marked the season as Christmas and my wife and I felt merry. It got even more Christmassy a few days later in Antigua where the ancient buildings that lined the large plaza were lit with small white lights. A band played Christmas music of all types. It was Christmas season 2015-2016.
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OL WANT EXPRESS
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The online magazine for personal air travel--for pilots, by pilots.
Introduction

This is NOT your father’s Air Facts

Air Facts was first published in 1938 by Leighton Collins, dedicated to “the development of private air transportation.” It’s a different world now, and it’s a different Air Facts. Relaunched in 2011 as an online journal, Air Facts still champions, educates, informs and entertains pilots worldwide with real-world flying experiences.

No aviation topic is off-limits.

Nothing predictable about Air Facts. We’ll tackle any topic, analyze any situation and have our readers weigh in with their input. And the speed of the Internet makes covering current subjects immediate – no waiting three months for an opinion to appear in print.

Air Facts needs you.

Here’s the amazing difference in Air Facts. It’s primarily reader-written. Yes, aviation icon Richard Collins continues to share his unbelievable wealth of information on flying, technique, weather and a host of other topics, but the majority of articles are supplied by you, the reader.

By the way, we have fun too!

Check out our regular series on Go/No Go where you decide whether a particular flight is safe to take. There’s no right or wrong answer – you decide. We write about our mistakes, our lessons learned and the pure joy of what it means to be a pilot. Our readers write about their trips – at Air Facts, you climb in, buckle up and ride along. Air Facts covers serious topics, but we don’t take ourselves too seriously. We know that pilots are always learning.

Join the discussion – Pull up a chair!

Air Facts is interactive, so don’t be a lurker. Is there anything duller than an aviation forum where Jetboy343, FrankieMac and CirrusPilot12 dominate the forum with the same tired arguments hashed and rehashed day after day? Not at Air Facts! Sure we have regular readers, but our unique visitors are in the thousands – they comment as well – which guarantees you’ll always find a fresh perspective from a wide variety of pilots and not just from a small group of “regulars.”

Thanks, Sporty’s, for Air Facts

Air Facts is brought to you by Sporty’s Pilot Shop and the production and distribution is directed by John Zimmerman, an accomplished pilot and aircraft owner. John writes for Air Facts as well – his own blog and other articles too. Plus John is the one who creates the intriguingly entertaining Go/No Go’s, many based on his own experiences.

No subscriptions, no renewals, no registration, but…

Visit Air Facts any time you’d like. It’s all free. You don’t have to subscribe or sign up. We’ve even made commenting easy – we hate when we’re asked to supply our name, rank, serial number and a dozen other personal details just to leave a comment, and we bet you do too. But we offer a free series of email alerts – typically two or three a month – to tell you when new stories are posted or to let you know when a particular discussion is getting hot and heavy. Just sign up here and join in on the fun. Air Facts is your online journal.

And, speaking of the original magazine, we also go back and frequently pick articles that remain relevant and present them in our online journal. Just as “Stick and Rudder” is still a best selling aviation book after over 60 years of publication, much in the original Air Factsis timeless.
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