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Air Facts

General Discussion  - 
 
Good reminder about the limitations of ADS-B traffic.
It was an unremarkable flight so far, but suddenly the large letters “TRAFFIC” plastered across my screen with corresponding alert. Three hundred feet below and slightly behind was an airplane, approaching fast. I banked left and right in my low wing craft, looking for the guy, who must be right below me, now 200 feet. On a collision course.
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Air Facts

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What's it like flying GA in a blizzard? Dick Collins says, "The bumps were really big on the approach... and the airplane squirmed around a lot on the taxi in." http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/01/airplanes-vs-blizzards-few-war-stories/
As the blizzard of 2016 was raging on January 23rd I looked at the video of stranded motorists, stuck cars, cars in ditches, and traffic snarls and wondered what in the world possessed those people to make them try to go somewhere. Then I scratched my head and remembered what possessed me when I used to challenge snowstorms in little airplanes. I was big on running the traps as scheduled and a blizzard was no excuse for not being there.
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Air Facts

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Have you ever preflighted your car? Admit it... http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/01/flying-saved-life/
To be honest, flying didn’t really save my life. It did, however, make me a better person, dad, husband and surgeon. Unlike many who grew up dreaming to fly, I didn’t start in aviation until I was 30. I never really thought that it was a possibility for me to become a pilot. This all changed with a free hamburger at a hangar at a small airport.
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General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Sometimes pilots feel pressure to cut corners. Here's why you shouldn't do it. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/01/cutting-corners-freight-pilot-regretting/
Forcing myself to stay calm, I faced the embarrassing possibility that a wheels-up landing might be the only way out. I was angry with myself for being such an idiot because failure to secure the freight was not only a clear breach of the regulations, but worse still, an example of poor airmanship. I vowed that never again would I be pressured into potentially dangerous situations by fears of job security.
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He's lucky to have survived that! Wow.

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Air Facts

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Believe it or not, Cuba once had a vibrant general aviation community. Can it come back? Would you like to fly there? 
Not too long after the birth of aviation itself, a surging community was forming in Cuba. It was a community that dominated the tropical skies. And that congregated at airstrips scattered amongst the sugarcane and tobacco fields. Can it come back?
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Air Facts

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Dick Collins shares some excellent tips in his latest article, including: "abandon any approach that can’t be flown while limiting the bank angle to 30-degrees."
Loss of control has been the number one cause of fatal private aviation accidents since the beginning of flying time. The phenomenon is actually one of the things that prompted my father to start Air Facts in 1938 and we have been talking about it here since that beginning. Rather than rehash all the information that has been cranked out by the government and the associations, let’s just have a discussion of the problem and how to avoid it.
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nytom4info's profile photoFASOLI ROBERTO PLATENSE's profile photo
 
Thank you Mr. Collins for your input on sports tapes. ;)
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Have them in circles
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Air Facts

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Instrument approaches get a lot of attention. Instrument departures? Not so much. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/01/ifr-departures-forgotten-procedure/
Instrument pilots obsess about approaches: if you can keep those needles crossed all the way down to 200 ft, you must be a good pilot. While shooting an ILS to minimums is an important skill, this all presupposes you managed to depart safely. Unfortunately, NTSB reports prove that's a big assumption - each year, a few pilots tragically learn that IFR departures aren't as simple as they seem.
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Incredible photos here, from a lucky pilot - he had a mid-air collision and lived to tell about it. 
At approximately 200 ft. AGL there was a thud and the 140B shuddered as a glimpse of red passed by my left-side window. Then a red airplane (type still unknown at that point) passed in front of my windscreen, hit the nose of my aircraft, and disappeared under my starboard wing, all in about three seconds.
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Amazing indeed!
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Air Facts

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What does it take to interest youth in aviation? This young pilot dropped out of college to chase his dream, and his suggestions may surprise you. http://airfactsjournal.com/2016/01/real-incentives-young-aviators-need-desire-passion-chances/
Aviation is not just about playing with your family’s toys and living out the thrills of flying every day. It’s about the friendships that are created in hangars, the sound of a Lycoming roaring to life after YOU replaced that cylinder, the old school feeling of grass under your landing gear, the controlling of numerous aircraft simultaneously, and the everlasting wonder of flight.
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General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
Have you ever flown with your mother?
My mom had flown with me once before, and it was a very short flight, but this flight was special. It was the first flight we had flown without anyone else on board and it was my first winter flight. She was very excited and surprisingly calm. We approached Lake Michigan and turned north just underneath Chicago's Bravo airspace.
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General Aviation (Small/Corporate)  - 
 
What do you think? Here's an interesting perspective from a pilot and doctor.
As the adage goes, the superior pilot will avoid demonstration of superior skills through superior judgment. The pilot who is extremely nervous before every flight may have a genuine concern for their ability, but a pilot without any self-questions or ongoing self-assessment may be supremely confident, yet much more dangerous. The best pilot is somewhere in between.
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A harrowing story here from a new Air Facts writer - and plenty of lessons to learn. http://airfactsjournal.com/2015/11/cg-overweight-night-turbulence/
For the first time in my flying life, I could feel the blood drain from my face and be nearly consumed by pure fear – because as I pulled the throttle back the nosed pitched up. As I tried to slow down, even with the stick nearly pushed all the way forward against the stop, the nose would start pitch up. And when it did, you could feel the onset of the stall start. There was no mistaking it and I knew that a stall would be unrecoverable.
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Have them in circles
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The online magazine for personal air travel--for pilots, by pilots.
Introduction

This is NOT your father’s Air Facts

Air Facts was first published in 1938 by Leighton Collins, dedicated to “the development of private air transportation.” It’s a different world now, and it’s a different Air Facts. Relaunched in 2011 as an online journal, Air Facts still champions, educates, informs and entertains pilots worldwide with real-world flying experiences.

No aviation topic is off-limits.

Nothing predictable about Air Facts. We’ll tackle any topic, analyze any situation and have our readers weigh in with their input. And the speed of the Internet makes covering current subjects immediate – no waiting three months for an opinion to appear in print.

Air Facts needs you.

Here’s the amazing difference in Air Facts. It’s primarily reader-written. Yes, aviation icon Richard Collins continues to share his unbelievable wealth of information on flying, technique, weather and a host of other topics, but the majority of articles are supplied by you, the reader.

By the way, we have fun too!

Check out our regular series on Go/No Go where you decide whether a particular flight is safe to take. There’s no right or wrong answer – you decide. We write about our mistakes, our lessons learned and the pure joy of what it means to be a pilot. Our readers write about their trips – at Air Facts, you climb in, buckle up and ride along. Air Facts covers serious topics, but we don’t take ourselves too seriously. We know that pilots are always learning.

Join the discussion – Pull up a chair!

Air Facts is interactive, so don’t be a lurker. Is there anything duller than an aviation forum where Jetboy343, FrankieMac and CirrusPilot12 dominate the forum with the same tired arguments hashed and rehashed day after day? Not at Air Facts! Sure we have regular readers, but our unique visitors are in the thousands – they comment as well – which guarantees you’ll always find a fresh perspective from a wide variety of pilots and not just from a small group of “regulars.”

Thanks, Sporty’s, for Air Facts

Air Facts is brought to you by Sporty’s Pilot Shop and the production and distribution is directed by John Zimmerman, an accomplished pilot and aircraft owner. John writes for Air Facts as well – his own blog and other articles too. Plus John is the one who creates the intriguingly entertaining Go/No Go’s, many based on his own experiences.

No subscriptions, no renewals, no registration, but…

Visit Air Facts any time you’d like. It’s all free. You don’t have to subscribe or sign up. We’ve even made commenting easy – we hate when we’re asked to supply our name, rank, serial number and a dozen other personal details just to leave a comment, and we bet you do too. But we offer a free series of email alerts – typically two or three a month – to tell you when new stories are posted or to let you know when a particular discussion is getting hot and heavy. Just sign up here and join in on the fun. Air Facts is your online journal.

And, speaking of the original magazine, we also go back and frequently pick articles that remain relevant and present them in our online journal. Just as “Stick and Rudder” is still a best selling aviation book after over 60 years of publication, much in the original Air Factsis timeless.