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The Aerospace Corporation
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Assuring Space Mission Success
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The Aerospace Corporation has provided independent technical and scientific research, development, and advisory services to national-security space programs since 1960. We operate a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) for the United States Air Force and the National Reconnaissance Office and support all national-security space programs. We also apply more than 40 years of experience with space systems to projects for civil agencies like NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, commercial companies, universities, and some international organizations in the national interest.

From our inception, our highly skilled technical people have focused on ensuring the success of every mission and developing the most effective and economic space-related hardware and software in the world. Our insight and involvement in space programs has significantly reduced the risk of launch failure and increased both satellite endurance and performance. Avoiding a single catastrophic failure resulting in the loss of operational capabilities can save the government more than three times the total annual Aerospace FFRDC budget.

We don't manufacture anything. Our greatest asset is the technical expertise of our people. Our involvement spans all facets of space systems: including systems engineering, testing, analysis, and development; acquisition support; launch readiness and certification; anomaly resolution; and the application of new technologies for existing and next-generation space systems. Our state-of-the-art laboratory facilities are staffed by some of the leading scientists in the world.

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310-336-5000

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A team of Aerospace engineers and scientists developed a unique procedure to test for defects on a seemingly impenetrable spacecraft heat shield.
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Aerospace scientists have developed a new way to study tin whiskers, hair-like crystalline structures that sometimes grow from tin-finished surfaces.
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Aerospace’s Kyle Logue is proposing audio sensors as a potential low-cost method to help self-driving vehicles navigate.
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Aerospace's innovative new study to enhance position, navigation, and timing resiliency is featured in XYHT magazine. Please turn to page 14 to view the article.
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A strategic study to enhance position, navigation, and timing (PNT) resiliency, challenging an Aerospace team to think about PNT resilience with a clean slate.
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Aerospace Board of Trustees Watches WGS-8 Launch

A Delta IV rocket roared into the darkened Florida spacecoast sky Wednesday evening carrying the latest Wideband Global SATCOM satellite for the U.S. Air Force.

For the first time ever, the Aerospace board of trustees — in El Segundo for their quarterly meeting — was able to see the Aerospace launch team in action as they viewed the WGS-8 launch from the Stars Mission Operations Center gallery.

After a very smooth countdown and a flawless launch, the WGS-8 satellite was successfully placed in orbit 42 minutes after its launch at 3:53 p.m. Pacific time.

“It’s always fantastic to be able to deliver new capability to the warfighter, and it was even more special to have our board there to witness the great work of the team as well,” said Randy Kendall, Aerospace vice president of Space Launch Operations.

The rocket flew in the Medium Plus (5,4) configuration with a five-meter payload fairing and four solid rocket boosters to augment its liquid hydrogen-fueled RS-68A main engine. It is the sixth time this configuration of the Delta IV has flown, all of them WGS missions. It is the most powerful Delta IV, next to the Heavy, and is the fastest launcher of all the Delta IV and Atlas V versions, clocked at zero to 60 miles per hour in 3.6 seconds.

In the final seconds of the countdown, the main engine ignited at six seconds before liftoff, creating a large Delta IV signature fireball at the base of the rocket. As the main engine throttled up to full power, the four strap-on solid motors lit and four hold-down bolts were released at T-minus zero seconds, allowing the rocket to speed off of Cape Canaveral’s pad 37B.

The WGS satellite constellation is the communications backbone for the U.S. military and its allies. The satellite was built by Boeing at its Satellite Development Center in El Segundo, the world’s largest satellite factory.

(Photo: United Launch Alliance, LLC) The WGS-8 satellite, encapsulated in its payload fairing, is attached atop a Delta IV rocket at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.
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Space system designers are eager to adopt additive manufacturing technology; however, certifying the processes and products remains a challenge.
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A public awareness campaign last year did little to deter the growing number of rogue drones flying near wildfires and forcing firefighters to ground their own aircraft.
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Three individuals received The Aerospace Corporation’s highest honors on Wednesday, Sept. 14.
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Aerospace's Henry Helvajian was interviewed by editors of SCHOTT magazine about how he uses their materials to produce components for nanosatellites.
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The Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Program Launch Operations team was recognized as recipients of the 2016 Program Recognition Award on Thursday, Aug.
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