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One of Vic Falls hidden treasures - The Chamabondo National Park

The 25 kilometre Chamabondo Game Drive in the southern part of the Park, begins about 5 kilometres outside of Victoria Falls town – just off the main road to Bulawayo. The roads are in reasonable condition, but close the roads after heavy rains.

After a decade of deterioration and neglect the Chamabondo section of Zambezi National Park just south of Victoria Falls is now alive and well. Many years ago this area was rich with game and was a popular venue for game drives by both operators and the public - it was a regular circuit for the iconic UTC zebra-striped minibuses of old.

A concerted effort by a number of dedicated conservationists, with support from the Victoria Falls community, donors and co-operation from Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Authority (ZimParks), has turned things around. Trevor Lane, Ian and Mary-Linda Gloss, Ian and Sue Thomson, Nathan Rabinovitch, Dan Jones and John Nicholson deserve special mention with the donation and installation of borehole pumps and the reconstruction of the viewing platform and shelter at No 3 site. ZimParks area manager Edmore Ngosi has been an extremely positive influence in moving the project forward.

On a recent game drive by a Victoria Falls resident counted numerous herds of elephant, hundreds of buffalo, giraffe, sable, big herds of zebra, impala, wildebeest, kudu, warthog and wild dog. They also counted kori bustard, lanner falcon, Jacobin cuckoo and Meyer’s parrot in this rich haven for birdlife. Lion have been seen regularly and a resident leopard seen and heard at the No 3 site. To enter the park, or to stay overnight, fees must be paid in advance to ZimParks at the Victoria Falls town office. The receipt is then presented to the ranger at the Chamabondo gate (turn off before Masuie Bridge). It is hoped that staffing and progress will soon allow fees to be paid at the gate.
Trevor Lane is currently overseeing the drilling of further boreholes, funded by recent donations, which will get sites 1 and 2 pumping. Donations have been directed through the Bhejane Trust.

The resuscitation of this park is an exciting development. It is easily accessible from the town of Victoria Falls, and will hopefully be enjoyed by residents, operators and of course tourists in the years ahead. The main drive leads through a teak forest into an extended area of wide open grassland, ideal for game viewing. Boreholes 1, 2 and 3 are sited down the length of this drive. It is hoped that some new tracks will be developed along the adjacent ridges.
The regeneration of Chamabondo goes hand in hand with the restoration of Kalisosa Vlei, being carried out by the Jafuta Foundation.

‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬ ‪#‎Chamabondo‬
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"A flock of birds before my eyes..." - Bird life in Victoria Falls

In the relatively small area around Victoria Falls, you'll be able to view a great diversity of birds within rain forest, riverine, gorge and savannah habitats. Access to these habitats is simple as road networks in Zambezi National Park and Mosi-oa-Tunya are good and boating allows easy access to the riverine fringes. For the more active, walking trails are abundant. The truly adventurous can explore birding habitats on horseback and move away from the tourist crowds.

A day's birding in the company of a good guide will allow you to clock up close to 100 species. Local species include Rock Pratincole, Schalow's Turaco, African Finfoot, Half Collared Kingfisher and Thick Billed Weaver. The hot and wet summer months between November and March are the best time for birding in Victoria Falls. During this time, resident species are in breeding plumage and the intra-African and Palaearctic migrants are around.

The somewhat serious birders can wander slightly further afield from the Vic Falls hub to view some of our other indigenous species. For example Swamp Nightjar at Imbabala, Black-Cheeked Lovebird in the Kafue, African Skimmers breed in Mana Pools, Chirinda Apalis in Zimbabwe's eastern highlands, Pel's Fishing-owl in the Okavango.
If you're really serious about birding, head to the Linyanti Concession where Ross's Turaco, first recorded in the southern Africa sub-region in 1974, was sighted again in 2011. High flood levels in the Kwando-Linyanti system and wetter conditions have definitely improved your chances to spot this rarity. Spend some time in western Zimbabwe, the Caprivi and northern Botswana.

Taken from http://www.victoriafalls.net

‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬ ‪#‎Birding‬
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Victoria Falls offers more than Victoria Falls itself. There is a vast amount of beautiful insects that often go unnoticed.

featured in this picture is a butterfly. Butterflies are part of the class of Insects in the order Lepidoptera. Adult butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. The group comprises the true butterflies (superfamily Papilionoidea), the skippers (superfamily Hesperioidea) and the moth-butterflies (superfamily Hedyloidea). Butterfly fossils date to the mid Eocene epoch, 40–50 million years ago.

Butterflies exhibit polymorphism, mimicry and aposematism. Some, like the Monarch, will migrate over long distances. Some butterflies have parasitic relationships with organisms including protozoans, flies, ants, other invertebrates, and vertebrates.Some species are pests because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees; however, some species are agents of pollination of some plants, and caterpillars of a few butterflies (e.g., harvesters) eat harmful insects. Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬
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2015-04-22
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Livingstone Island Activities

Livingstone Island Activities will be closed as of Tuesday 21st April, 2015 until the 12th May, 2015 both days inclusive; the last Clients will visit the island on Monday 20th April, 2015 for afternoon tea... and when we reopen we will welcome clients for a Breezer on Wednesday 13th May, 2015.

Book your trip to Livingstone Island for when it reopens with Adventure Zone by emailing info@adventurezonevicfalls.com, calling +263 13 44424, visiting our town office at Shop No. 4 Phumula Centre, Victoria Falls or visit our website www.adventurezonevicfalls.com

‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬
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The Victoria Falls Rainforest.
The famed "rainforest" of the Victoria Falls National Park on the Zimbabwean side of the falls is in effect an extension of the riparian woodland/forest, enriched by the constant sprays from the Falls. There are nearly 150 tree/tall shrub species occurring within this habitat, plus over 50 shrub and 150 field/herb species. Together with grasses, sedges, ferns and other groups the total is over 400 plant species. Many of the tree specimens in the Falls Park are identified with small metallic name plates, viable from the paths.
The rain forest supports a variety of tree species, of which the African Ebony (Diospyros mespiliformis) is probably the largest and most striking, with its straight trunk, dark bark and alternate oblong leaves. Another similar species, and one of the common trees of the rainforest is the Red Milkwood (Mimusops zeyheri). Four species of large fig are present, two of which are more easily distinguished - the hairy leaved Cape Fig (Ficus capensis) and mututa (Ficus ingens) which is a strangling creeper which eventually kills the tree which supports it. Also found are two species of Waterbooms (Syzygium guineense and S. cordatum), with leathery opposite leaves (elliptic and cordate shaped respectively). The hybrid Waterboom (S. guineense barotense) is the commonest tree in the rainforest, and has become so due to its ability to spread vegetatively, with shoots from its roots producing new trees. Another imposing tree is the Natal Mahogony (Trichilia emetica), with its pinnate leaves. Not so common is mulombelombe (Strychnos potatorum) with its opposite, three-veined leaves.
Of the smaller tree species, the African Olive (Olea Africana) is present, with alternate, narrow, lanceolate leaves. The second most common tree species is the Wild Date Palm (Phoenix reclinata), which together with the Waterboom and Milkwood species make up over 80% of the total tree species in the rain forest.
The shrub layer includes Feretia aeruginescens, a straggling shrub producing clusters of delicate pink flowers and spherical red fruit. Pavetta cataractarum, named after the Falls, produces masses of tubular white fragrant flowers, and Hibiscus calyphyllus produces a large yellow flower typical of the Hibiscus family.
The unique micro-climate created by the spray from the Falls particularly favours smaller moisture loving plants, especially the herbaceous ground flora which contains some of the rare and unique species to be found in the rain forest. Throughout the year it is possible to find flowering examples of the bright yellow flowered little Gentian (Sebaea barbeyana), the blue flowered Lobelia spp and the bright mauve flowers of Nesaea floribunda. The early rains in November bring the Fireballs, (Haemanthus filiflorus and H. multiflorus), known locally as the 'red hot pin cushion', with their large globes of many slender red tubular flowers. In December the ground orchid Calanthe corymbosa develops its large white flowers, the wild gentian (Chironia palustris) adds its pink flowers and the Flame Lily (Gloriosa superba) its red and yellow flowers to the natural display. Ferns, notably the Maidenhair (Adiantum capillus-veneris), which is common, and the near endemic Cheilanthes farinose, with its striking sulphur silver yellow under-surface to the fronds, can be found throughout the rain forest area at any time of year.
An 'alien' (non-natural to the area) species, Lantana camara, is a problem in the park and surrounding areas of the Falls. Introduced from South America as an ornamental garden creeper, it is a highly aggressive species which out-competes the local indigenous flora, and without active management is overtaking large areas of the park at the exclusion of the natural species. Another alien invader, the Sword Fern (Nerphrolepis cordifolia) is also of increasing concern.
‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬
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Have you started training for the 2015 Victoria Falls Marathon? Are you in need of accommodation? Email rooms@adventurezonevicfalls.com to get the best deals on budget accommodation in Victoria Falls.

This year is promising to be bigger and better than last year. Register online today by clicking on the below link
http://vicfalls.topevents.co.za/

This will be an event not to be missed.
‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎VicFallsMarathon‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬ #2015
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"Just another day in Africa"

You can witness such beauty by booking a sunset cruise today with Adventure Zone.

For more info please contact our reservations on info@adventurezonevicfalls.com or call +263 13 44424

‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎PersonailseYourExperience‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬

Photo taken by +Dylan Cook 
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Are you aware that White Water Rafting is still operating?

In most cases we would have closed white water rafting until next season due to high water levels. Join Adventure Zone for the best white water rafting in the world.

For more info please contact our reservations on info@adventurezonevicfalls.com, or call +263 13 44424

‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎PersonailseYourExperience‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬
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Weighing up to 6000 kg (6.6 tons) and measuring up to 3.3 m (10 ft.) at the shoulder, the African elephant is the world’s largest land mammal. It is characterized by its highly dexterous trunk, long curved tusks, and massive ears.
A combination of the upper lip and nose, an African elephant’s trunk is extremely versatile. Elephants use their trunk for smelling, breathing, detecting vibrations, caressing their young, sucking up water, and grasping objects. The tip of their trunk is comprised of two opposable extensions, or fingers, which allow for extreme dexterity.
Both male and female elephants possess tusks, which are modified incisor teeth. Although tusks are present at birth, the “baby tusks” fall out after a year, and permanent ones replace them. These tusks will continue to grow throughout the elephant’s life. Similar to the trunk, elephant tusks are utilized in a wide range of activities. They are used for digging, foraging, and fighting. At times, they also act as a resting place for the elephant’s very heavy trunk.
An African elephant’s large ears also serve many purposes. The ears’ large surface area helps radiate excess heat under the harsh African sun. The ears are also often used to communicate visually. Flapping their ears can signify either aggression or joy. And finally, elephants’ ears, used in conjunction with the soles of their feet and their trunk, aid in the ability to hear sounds over long distances. On average, an elephant can hear another elephant’s call at 4 km (2.5 mi.) away. Under ideal conditions, their range of hearing can be increased to 10 km (6.2 mi.).
Although elephants can make a very wide range of sounds (10 octaves), they mostly communicate through low frequency sounds called “rumbling.” In fact, elephants are capable of producing and perceiving sounds one to two octaves lower than the human hearing limit. As lower frequency sounds travel farther than their higher counterparts, their range of communication is extensive. Furthermore, elephants have the ability to judge the distance from another elephant based on the pitch of his/her call. As the sound travels over distances, the higher tones will fade out, leaving a lower pitch.
Communication is vital to elephants, who rely on a social network for survival. The sustaining social unit is a herd of mothers and their young, sisters, and female cousins, led by an older matriarch. Male elephants will leave the herd at around 14 years old when they hit puberty. They then join a loose-knit band of other bull elephants, leaving the bachelor herd at will to search for potential mates.
- See more at: http://www.animalfactguide.com/animal-fa…/african-elephant/…
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The Victoria Falls Rainforest.
The famed "rainforest" of the Victoria Falls National Park on the Zimbabwean side of the falls is in effect an extension of the riparian woodland/forest, enriched by the constant sprays from the Falls. There are nearly 150 tree/tall shrub species occurring within this habitat, plus over 50 shrub and 150 field/herb species. Together with grasses, sedges, ferns and other groups the total is over 400 plant species. Many of the tree specimens in the Falls Park are identified with small metallic name plates, viable from the paths.
The rain forest supports a variety of tree species, of which the African Ebony (Diospyros mespiliformis) is probably the largest and most striking, with its straight trunk, dark bark and alternate oblong leaves. Another similar species, and one of the common trees of the rainforest is the Red Milkwood (Mimusops zeyheri). Four species of large fig are present, two of which are more easily distinguished - the hairy leaved Cape Fig (Ficus capensis) and mututa (Ficus ingens) which is a strangling creeper which eventually kills the tree which supports it. Also found are two species of Waterbooms (Syzygium guineense and S. cordatum), with leathery opposite leaves (elliptic and cordate shaped respectively). The hybrid Waterboom (S. guineense barotense) is the commonest tree in the rainforest, and has become so due to its ability to spread vegetatively, with shoots from its roots producing new trees. Another imposing tree is the Natal Mahogony (Trichilia emetica), with its pinnate leaves. Not so common is mulombelombe (Strychnos potatorum) with its opposite, three-veined leaves.
Of the smaller tree species, the African Olive (Olea Africana) is present, with alternate, narrow, lanceolate leaves. The second most common tree species is the Wild Date Palm (Phoenix reclinata), which together with the Waterboom and Milkwood species make up over 80% of the total tree species in the rain forest.
The shrub layer includes Feretia aeruginescens, a straggling shrub producing clusters of delicate pink flowers and spherical red fruit. Pavetta cataractarum, named after the Falls, produces masses of tubular white fragrant flowers, and Hibiscus calyphyllus produces a large yellow flower typical of the Hibiscus family.
The unique micro-climate created by the spray from the Falls particularly favours smaller moisture loving plants, especially the herbaceous ground flora which contains some of the rare and unique species to be found in the rain forest. Throughout the year it is possible to find flowering examples of the bright yellow flowered little Gentian (Sebaea barbeyana), the blue flowered Lobelia spp and the bright mauve flowers of Nesaea floribunda. The early rains in November bring the Fireballs, (Haemanthus filiflorus and H. multiflorus), known locally as the 'red hot pin cushion', with their large globes of many slender red tubular flowers. In December the ground orchid Calanthe corymbosa develops its large white flowers, the wild gentian (Chironia palustris) adds its pink flowers and the Flame Lily (Gloriosa superba) its red and yellow flowers to the natural display. Ferns, notably the Maidenhair (Adiantum capillus-veneris), which is common, and the near endemic Cheilanthes farinose, with its striking sulphur silver yellow under-surface to the fronds, can be found throughout the rain forest area at any time of year.
An 'alien' (non-natural to the area) species, Lantana camara, is a problem in the park and surrounding areas of the Falls. Introduced from South America as an ornamental garden creeper, it is a highly aggressive species which out-competes the local indigenous flora, and without active management is overtaking large areas of the park at the exclusion of the natural species. Another alien invader, the Sword Fern (Nerphrolepis cordifolia) is also of increasing concern.
‪#‎AdventureZone‬ ‪#‎AdventureLodge‬ ‪#‎VictoriaFalls‬ ‪#‎VicFalls‬
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