Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Ade Oshineye
A chaotic neutral point of view
A chaotic neutral point of view
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Great stuff from 2018. “99 Good News Stories You Probably Didn’t Hear About in 2018” by Angus Hervey https://link.medium.com/ZPwG8gmRXS . h/t +Kathryn Marie
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
There's a new prime record. Written in hex, it's a 1 followed by over 20 million F's.

https://www.johndcook.com/blog/2018/12/22/51st-mersenne-prime/
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"""When Belgians – whether from the Flemish, the Walloon or the often overlooked German community – watch the Götterdämmerung of ineptocracy that is Brexit, they are baffled but entertained. There may be some well-deserved Schadenfreude as they watch what happens to a country that becomes addicted to fetishising its own nationhood and imbibes too many of the clichés it once produced for export: commonsensical, mild, tolerant people led by pragmatic, cultivated politicians upholding the dignity of their office in the Mother of Parliaments. My cousin points out that the English (and he does say les anglais, not les gallois or les écossais) are the last people to believe those myths. In Scarface, Elvira Hancock (Michelle Pfeiffer) tells Tony Montana (Al Pacino) not to get high on his own supply. Cataclysms like Brexit, and politicians like Jacob Rees-Mogg and Boris Johnson, are what happens when an entire country gets high on its own supply, but everyone else stopped buying long ago.

I was in Brussels recently, taking my son to watch Anderlecht play, when I heard some English people in a café asking the waiter why no one liked the English. They were nice people asking a genuine question, but often it’s the wrong people who ask the right questions. The waiter replied, politely and in perfect English: ‘We can read your newspapers and watch your television; we hear what your politicians and your journalists say about us.’ That summed it up: all this time we Brits thought we were talking to ourselves, and we were, but everyone else was listening in. Belgians are not surprised by Brexit: it’s just the coagulation as policy of what’s been flowing as attitude for decades.

In the UK things seem to be happening both very fast and very slowly, as if Brexit had created its own durée: every hour there are new crises, new declarations, new denunciations, and yet things are no further advanced than the day after the referendum. I found more preparation for Brexit on Zeebrugge port’s website than I’ve seen, read or heard from British politicians or (most of) the media. Zeebrugge will be ‘entirely Brexit-proof’, the port authority says. The view from Belgium is that the only place that isn’t Brexit-proof is Britain itself"""
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
#TIL about: https://shin.gokgs.com/

It's KGS but on the web and with UX from the 2010s.
Shin KGS
Shin KGS
shin.gokgs.com
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
"""
There are also real-world consequences, though much more subtle, to the wholesale deletion of the recent past on the internet. Our digital lives are our real lives, and digital culture — Tumblr culture — is real culture. When we lose that, we lose whole communities, friendships, methods of communication, jokes, and artifacts. Perhaps we never should have believed all this would last forever — are we all still going to be just _tweeting things_ when we’re 75? — but the march to delete the internet of the 2000s seems to be moving along much faster than the march to make today’s internet a better place.
"""
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded