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Adam Truong
Attends University of California, Irvine School of Medicine
2,091 followers|27,804 views
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Adam Truong

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For Students:
Dropbox is offering 3GB of free space just for being a student. All you have to do is authenticate a .edu email address. Dont worry, the free space can be applied to any dropbox account you have and doesn't have to go to a .edu acct.

Every sign up gets your school closer to winning the Space Race competition, where the winning school will have lots of free space distributed to its students. Sounds like a good deal to me.

Help me out by using this link. It will give me an additional 500 mb referral bonus.

https://www.dropbox.com/spacerace?r=NTU1MTE4ODQ1OQ

Cheers!!
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LA Subway Adventure: Universal City Station
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Add to and update the map with Google Map Maker, and see your edits in Google Maps. Start mapping the places you know.
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The best reason to do a lot of editing is to get "trusted" status so that any edits you make become immediately visible. I like being able to edit a map and then immediately see a more accurate version on my phone.
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The drug “crenezumab” which is in late stage clinical trials is entering patient trials and marks the first large-scale effort to treat alzheimers in patients who have not yet shown symptoms. The $100 million trial seeks to show the reduction of alzheimers symptoms by reducing the clumping of amyloid and would offer support for using amyloid as a treatment marker. This trial and other prevention trials are expensive because notable results and developments may take years before they surface.
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Imagine choking on food, and instead of looking for someone to give you the heimlich, you reach into your pocket and inject oxygen into your blood. The growing market demand for tiny-sized instruments has made this technology feasible. Oxygen injections are not a new idea, but past methods have proven unsafe and noneffective. Proven to work in rabbits, nanoparticle-bound oxygen can be injected into the blood and instantly diffused within red blood cells. I expect human trials to be underway soon.
In a monumental breakthrough with far ranging implications, cardiologists at the Children's Hospital Boston in Massachusetts have kept suffocating rabbits alive for 15 minutes with injections of oxyge...
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Had a chance to snap a couple pics during the short time I was in Vegas this weekend.
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The da Vinci robot has been the model for medical innovation, ushering a new era of robotics-assisted surgeries. But has this movement done anything but drive up price? The evidence against this is limited. We as both consumers and providers need to objectively compare current medical treatments to administer only efficient proven therapies. Cost can no longer hide in the shadows of ignorance. Cost is becoming a factor in medical intervention options more than ever, and this is good for everybody, even innovation.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/27/in-medicine-falling-for-fake-innovation/?partner=rss&emc=rss
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When tires have reached the end of their lifespan they are often piled in a junk yard for many years. This presents a problem for urban communities because it provides an excellent breeding ground for anopheles mosquitoes, the same mosquitoes responsible for the transmission of malaria. New research has shown that the addition of VectoBac insecticide to the water used when manufacturing tires has significantly reduced the amount of mosquito growth within discarded tires.

http://www.parasitesandvectors.com/content/5/1/95
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Why am I picturing the Springfield Tire Fire from the Simpsons?
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Consumers are outraged after claims against Kashi's natural products surfaced. While Kashi's cereal flaunts a stamp of "all natural," the scientific laboratory Cornucopia Institute has found that 100% of the grains inside the box were genetically modified organisms or GMOs. The grains were genetically modified to withstand high levels of weed killer  While there is no clear guidelines to what qualifies as all-natural, Kashi first defended themselves by claiming no fault in describing "all-natural" as minimally processes with no additional add-ins and then attempted to discredit the Cornucopia Institute. Kashi has now been accused of "green-washing", meaning that they are taking advantage of health-conscience consumers by falsely badging foods in order to sell them more expensive. 

This was not an isolated incident and consumers have united to illuminate companies toting health labels and labeling practices. The USDA urges consumers to buy 100% certified organic foods which excludes GMOs and excessive pesticide levels. The push for organics have been perpetuated by health consequences caused by high pesticide levels in the air associated with genetically modified organisms grown to withstand the dangerous concentrations. Consumers have lobbied for more stringent transparency of GMO use. 
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Yay, more GM fear mongering (sigh). I have to laugh at Kashi's plight, though. There are way too many companies engaging in this "green washing".
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Facebook has stunned the world with its record setting ipo, but it has had an equally large impact in the science world as well. Neuroscience researchers have been using Facebook to study social interactions and have found that we are intrinsically more social than we perceive. We are set to think about people by default and it is only when we are actively processing information (like studying intensely) that we forget. However, it only takes 2 second to return to our social thoughts. People are even more fearful of social threats than physical ones in many cases. Facebook's emergence has changed our understanding of social interactions and research shows that Facebook (or any other social website) interaction activates dopamine receptors (responsible for pleasure) just as a real social meeting, but doesn't provide the same stimulation of oxytocin or serotonin release (responsible for the calming effects) that is supposed to let you know when you have had enough. Just as people are becoming overweight, online social networking may  promote gorging and an unbalanced neurotransmitter activity level. 
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People
In his circles
354 people
Have him in circles
2,091 people
Mahmoud Mirsalehan's profile photo
Antoniette Rozean's profile photo
Ryan Daniels's profile photo
Tattoo 122's profile photo
Don McIntosh's profile photo
Avinash Chaurasia's profile photo
Alex Caster's profile photo
Nauka Znanost's profile photo
Renata Davidson's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Medical Student
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Think; Think; Do
Introduction
I want to see big changes in the world. Till then, I'll initiate small ones.
Education
  • University of California, Irvine School of Medicine
    Medicine, 2012 - present
  • University of Southern California
    Masters in Global Medicine, 2011 - 2012
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