Profile

Cover photo
Adam Liss
1,703 followers|1,853,388 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotos

Stream

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
38
2
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
"[Google] copied 11,500 lines of code," Oracle attorney Peter Bicks said during closing arguments. "It's undisputed. They took the code, they copied it, and put it right into Android."

I don't doubt that. Why? Because that's how APIs are intended to be used. In fact, it's because developers expect that APIs will be copied that Oracle's software has become the standard. Copyright the APIs and developers will drop your platform like the proverbial hot potato and flock to someone else's.

What's an API? It's an application programming interface: it's the way you want other programs (applications) to communicate (interface) with your own. And more often than not, the interface is fairly obvious; it's like dialing a 1, then the area code, and then the 7-digit phone number of the person you want to call. It's a little complicated if you think about remembering all those numbers in the right order, but Imagine what would happen if you changed phone companies and had to dial them in reverse! Or if you changed again and had to dial the last 7 digits first, then a 5 (because this company doesn't use 1 to mean long distance), and then a totally different area code that's been copyrighted by the company. How long would that company stay in business? The system works because it's always done the same way, and everyone knows how to do it.

Once you try to "own" a convention and stop anyone else from using it, the whole system breaks down. It won't be long before someone will replace yours with a different standard that makes you—and all the equipment your customers are using—obsolete.

And your customers will be angry, not only because you're being a jerk about it, but because it's inconvenient and expensive for them to migrate to different technology.

What's more, since you've already burned them once, they won't be so quick to come back. People have long memories when you hit them in the pocketbook.


via +Craig Froehle​
Oracle has spent many millions trying to get a chunk of Android, to no avail.
19
4
Sean M's profile photoG Kochanski's profile photoEric Mintz's profile photoMartijn van Schaardenburg's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Sean M​ I don't think all developers are at risk. Very few developers are reimplementing Java. I don't think anybody is arguing that merely using Java is somehow infringing.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
I wonder if politicians will ever understand social media.
 
some of the reactions are rather funny
A controversial ally of Russia's President Putin is not amused by online mocking of his search for lost pet.
1 comment on original post
8
1
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Not to worry. The TSA misses 95% of the weapons that are brought through airport security during tests anyway, so the mathematically expected value of the penalty is only $5k.
 
Two years ago, the Georgia Carry law was passed by the state legislature allowing people with permits to carry guns in more places. It was nicknamed the "guns everywhere" law, but now the FBI is stepping up to clarify: the airport is not one of those places.
Up until now, the interpretation of that law has been that it's not a crime to accidentally bring a gun to the TSA checkpoints. The agents could turn a gun-toting person away and tell the person to secure the gun in a car or in luggage. That interpretation is about to change in a big way.
Begriming June 1, if you carry a gun to a TSA checkpoint, the weapon will be confiscated. You'll also face a fine.
"The real intent is just to deter people from entering the check point with a weapon to begin with," Special Agent in Charge Britt Johnson told 11Alive's Duffie Dixon.
Two years ago, the Georgia Carry law was passed by the state legislature allowing people with permits to carry guns in more places. It was nicknamed the
View original post
8
Adam Liss's profile photoPhillip Landmeier (ᚠ)'s profile photo
5 comments
 
+Adam Liss​ Yeah, for background you have to read the correspondence between the founders. What they intended is clearly stated and why. They meant to protect the right of citizens to possess the same weaponry as the government in order to keep the government in check. This stems from history, where governments restricted citizens from possessing certain weapons that only the king's men could have. But technology has made this goal absurd. In 1785 the most powerful weapon in the world was a 36 pounder (naval cannon). You can't reasonably have a nuke or other WMD in your garage. Those things were unimaginable in 1785. So the whole point of the 2nd is obsolete today.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
It must be nice to be so arrogant that you can say anything and keep a straight face, and so rich and well connected that laws don't apply to you.

Anyone remember this guy?
In an oddly ironic twist, today Donald Trump announced that he has picked as chairman of his newly launched fundraising operation none other than a former employee of the bank he has repeatedly criticized in the past, and which he used as a foil to criticize Ted Cruz: Goldman Sachs.  In addition to Goldman, Mnuchin also worked for Soros previously. Where it gets even more ironic is that Mnuchin has donated frequently to Democrats, including to Cl...
5
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google's Facilities teams never cease to amaze. They continue to build exciting new spaces: new offices, new meeting rooms, even entire new floors, and they always leave clues about what's coming next.

I've already filed a ticket because the "Learn more" link is broken. Mostly because their replies make my day.
27
2
Craig Froehle's profile photoKathryn van Nieuwkerk's profile photoPhillip Landmeier (ᚠ)'s profile photo
4 comments
 
Hah!
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,703 people
Woodrow P Davis's profile photo
Pal Beats's profile photo
Rachelle Greene's profile photo
Aidoo Tony Aidoo's profile photo
Robyn Miller's profile photo
Sergei Maroz's profile photo
Kotireddy Ram's profile photo
Sonny Franckel's profile photo
Gesa Pelz's profile photo

Communities

10 communities

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Scary 
U.S. health officials on Thursday reported the first case in the country of a patient with an infection resistant to all known antibiotics, and expressed grave concern that the superbug could pose serious danger for routine infections if it spreads.
4 comments on original post
10
4
duane attaway's profile photoRodford Smith's profile photoAriel Allon's profile photo
3 comments
 
current antibiotics. It is, after all, an arms race.
See the timeline chart here, for example: http://lumibyte.eu/microbiology-news/antimicrobial-resistance-timeline/

Of course, it's one we seem to be starting to lose, which makes sense, but is scary as hell.
This is a great read from a few years back about the golden era and what it means to live after that -- things we take for granted, especially medically, will revert to how they were a century ago
https://medium.com/@fernnews/imagining-the-post-antibiotics-future-892b57499e77#.ppuu6uggu
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bookmarked to watch later. (If you watch it before I do, I'd love to hear your comments!)
1
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Corina Marinescu​​​​​​​, comments are disabled on your post (and for good reason, I'm sure. Sometimes I feel like I should apologize for half the population on the planet), but I think it's important to clear up a common misconception about escape velocity. I'm sure you know this, but I suspect many of your readers don't.

Escape velocity is not the speed at which a rocket must travel to leave a planet. It's easy to imagine a rocket that produces just enough thrust to inch ever upward, as slowly as you'd like, forever. As long as its flight is powered, there is no minimum velocity to be concerned about.

Escape velocity is the slowest rate at which an unpowered projectile must travel away from the surface of the planet so that gravity will never reverse its direction of travel.

In other words, how fast do you need to throw a rock toward the sky so that it will never return to Earth?

It's also important to realize that, since gravity weakens with distance, it matters where you measure escape velocity from. On Earth, it's typically measured from sea level. But you don't need to throw that rock quite as fast from the top of Mount Everest as you do from the Galapagos. (Think of it this way: by the time the Galapagos rock reaches the altitude of Mt. Everest it will already have slowed down quite a bit. That's the speed you'd need to throw the Everest rock.)

It's also interesting to realize that a rocket that reaches the moon has still not "escaped" from Earth! If that we true, we wouldn't have a moon at all, because it would have wandered off eons ago. Similarly, the moon (and all of the planets, and all of their moons) have not escaped the Sun.

I wonder if the Voyager spacecraft have escaped, or if our great great great ... grandchildren will see them again one day. I'm off to go googling!

Edit: yes, they've escaped! The Voyagers reached escape velocity as Jupiter boosted them on their way. Here's a graph that shows the speed of Voyager 2 throughout its journey. http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/54983
 
This graphic shows how fast a rocket must go to leave every planet
Gravity makes it possible for us to live on Earth, but it also makes it pretty hard to leave. Satellites fight gravity by going just fast enough to free-fall around the planet indefinitely, like the International Space Station, with many traveling at speeds of more than 17,500 mph.
But if you want to leave this planet, you have to go faster. This speed is called the escape velocity.

And because other planets in our solar system have different gravitational strength, they each have different escape velocities.

Read the article:
http://www.techinsider.io/rocket-escape-velocity-earth-planets-2016-05

#space   #escapevelocity   #nasa   #gravity  
4 comments on original post
21
2
Adam Liss's profile photoZeke Cao's profile photoCorina Marinescu's profile photo
14 comments
 
I hear you +Adam Liss​, we are all awear what is the difference between speed and velocity in physics....and I still disagree with your words arrangement.

Gravitational escape velocity is the release velocity of a freely moving object that has been accelerated away from a planet or moon etc, such that this initial velocity is sufficient to prevent it from being overcome by gravitational force and falling back to the surface.
I'll stick with that, as for escape speed that's a different soup. Cheers,

Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
TIL: Ignosticism is the idea that the question of the existence of God is meaningless, because the term "god" has no unambiguous definition. Ignosticism requires a good, non-controversial definition of god before arguing on its existence.
10
Helen Read's profile photoAdam Liss's profile photo
2 comments
 
That's the same type of question I ask whenever someone wants to start a debate about religion, or vaccines, or racism, or just about anything that promises to be a rathole: "What would it take to change your mind?"
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hey, Natalie, how do you feel about climbing and diving with a couple of cameras strapped* to your head?


*Autocorrect wanted them stapled to your head. Ew.
 
Go ahead, do look down. You got this. Take a virtual #roadtrip before heading out this #MemorialDay. http://goo.gl/EqxquE
2 comments on original post
4
Margaret Bumby's profile photoAdam Liss's profile photoKathryn van Nieuwkerk's profile photo
4 comments
 
I like auto-corrupt! It's not me that's corrupt, it's my phone :) 
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
PSA: Read the conditions you agreed to on any social media site. The "privacy notice" you added to your profile may sound official, but it affords you exactly zero protection.

Similarity, that person who blocks you or deletes your comments is not infringing on your First Amendment rights.

---------- BEGIN PUBLIC HOAX ----------

**PRIVACY NOTICE: Warning - any person and/or institution and/or Agent and/or Agency of any governmental structure including but not limited to the United States Federal Government also using or monitoring/using this website or any of its associated websites, you do NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, and/or the comments made about my photos or any other "picture" art posted on my profile.

You are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing, disseminating, or taking any other action against me with regard to this profile and the contents herein. The foregoing prohibitions also apply to your employee, agent, student or any personnel under your direction or control.

The contents of this profile are private and legally privileged and confidential information, and the violation of my personal privacy is punishable by law. UCC 1-103 1-308 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WITHOUT PREJUDICE

---------- END PUBLIC HOAX ----------
13
blanche nonken's profile photoPaul Hartzer's profile photoEd S's profile photo
4 comments
Ed S
 
It's true. But to some extent they also want to give their users what they want. For example, Google's Takeout service allows people to take their posts away when they leave - that's only a slight advantage to Google.

But also, if someone were architecting a new social space, perhaps an open source and decentralised one, they might consider user-friendly features.
Add a comment...
Adam's Collections
People
Have him in circles
1,703 people
Woodrow P Davis's profile photo
Pal Beats's profile photo
Rachelle Greene's profile photo
Aidoo Tony Aidoo's profile photo
Robyn Miller's profile photo
Sergei Maroz's profile photo
Kotireddy Ram's profile photo
Sonny Franckel's profile photo
Gesa Pelz's profile photo
Communities
10 communities
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Engineer, Puzzle Fanatic, Incurable Punster. Armchair cryptographer, security and privacy advocate. Insatiably curious about the world and its inhabitants.
Introduction
I am a natural experimentalist.  I love to learn, to innovate, and to make new mistakes.  I rarely take myself seriously; there are far more appropriate subjects to be serious about.

I find humor and puzzles in the ordinary, laugh at math jokes, and tend to cram far too many thoughts into one sentence. I'm fascinated by languages and smitten by the beauty and utility of American Sign Language. Bad grammar drives me nuts. 

I'm fond of teaching through analogy and counter-examples, asking silly questions, and gentle teasing.  Sometimes I make stuff up just to watch the gears turn in someone's head.  Whether you're a child or an adult, I'll show you that even "hard" subjects like math and science can be easyand funto learn.  If you think that's nuts, it's because you've been taught wrong.  I'll prove it to you. Try me.

I have an extremely low tolerance for willful ignorance, illogic, and baseless "alternative" explanations for the way the world works.

A 3-year-old gave up asking me "Why?" before I ran out of answers.

I'm terribly shy but have always found it easy to make people laugh.  Often at me.  And not always intentionally.  Childhood friends still tell me I'd have made a great stand-up comedian or psychiatrist; I can't help wondering how those talents are related.  But I'm sure we're all better off leaving that question unanswered.

Will work ... no ... have worked for chocolate.

How did you find me? If you added me to your circles and don't know me personally, I'd love to know what caught your interest!
Bragging rights
I have the best coworkers on the planet.
Work
Occupation
I disguise magical, complicated technology as simple, everyday tools.