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Adam Liss
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Adam Liss

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Have they stopped teaching this in middle school?
 
Increase $10 by 150 percent and you have:
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$5
0%
$15
9%
$25
91%
$35
0%
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James Taylor (Counsel Dew)'s profile photoPepper Lebeck-Jobe's profile photoPaul Hartzer's profile photopaul beard's profile photo
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+Paul Hartzer But it confuses some of us. I get the wording and I got (I think) the right answer but I had doubts about it. 
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To have popped popcorn on the stove.
To have gotten up to change the channel.
To have waited for the radio to warm up.
To have thrown change over the car from the passenger's seat into the toll bucket.
To have played a record with a sewing needle and paper cone.
To have waved a calculator in a dark room to see 8's everywhere.
To have pumped the gas pedal (without flooding the engine) to start the car.
To have set the alarm clock before bed every night, so it wouldn't go off at 7 PM.
To have asked for (and used) free maps at the gas station.
To have grumbled because the person ahead of me wanted to pay with a credit card.
To remember the smell of purple-ink ditto sheets in school.
To have switched the high beams on and off with my left foot.
To have gotten a CB license.
To have clapped the erasers to choke my classmates.
To have made actual carbon copies.
To have gotten my dime back because the line was busy.
To have held the rabbit ears to bring in Dr. Demento from a station in the next state.
To have set my watch to WWV at 5, 10, 15, or 20 MHz on the shortwave radio.

To have ridden in the "way back" of the station wagon.
To have sent a check and my passbook to the bank to make a deposit.
To have eaten food with Red Dye #2 in it.
To have snacked on Space Sticks, Koogle, and Thick 'N' Frosty.
To have eaten Quisp, Quake, and King Vitaman for breakfast.
To have eaten Libbyland TV dinners while watching Wild Kingdom.

To have seen billboards, commercials, books, and magazines without typos.
To never have had to CamelCase anything.
To know who shot J.R.
To make a person-to-person call; to refuse a collect call from Uncle Homenow.



via +Terry Poulin​​​​​​
 
I'm old enough to have used a typewriter.
To have rolled down the windows in a car.
To have dialed a phone.
To remember when right on red wasn't legal.
To have used a ditto machine.
To know that Paul Lynde was always the center square.
To have idolized O.J. Simpson.
To have called a radio station to request a song by phone.
To have recorded songs off the radio to avoid buying the records.
To have gone to the drive-in many times, including to see Star Wars.
To call it Star Wars, not "A New Hope" or "Episode 4."
To have really been afraid of global thermonuclear war.

That's all I got right now. How about you?
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Ah, that was my problem: I was working with cents, not dollars. :-) Actually it's ×1.07, but I know what you meant.

I meant that she probably thought I'd multiplied $1.99 by .07 and held all the intermediate results in my head, rather than using Nila's method.
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Tonight's dinnertime conversation (unwittingly via +Kimberly Chapman​):

Me: How many pounds are in a US (short) ton?
PTQ: 2000.
Me: Does anyone know how many are in a British (long) ton?
[ . . . ]
Me: I just found out there are 2240 pounds.
Daughter: That's expensive!
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Napoleon wasn't actually short. His height was measured in pre-metric French feet and inches, which were larger than English feet and inches. 
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Want a free extra 2GB of Google Drive storage, and a more secure Google account? Take a quick security check-up for your account and you'll get an extra 2GB of free-forever Drive storage. (And yes, it stacks with last year's security checkup bonus!)

https://security.google.com/settings/security/secureaccount
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Adam Liss's profile photoEric Shaw's profile photoJ Stone's profile photoMartijn van Schaardenburg's profile photo
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That is true, it makes sense for keeping more high quality photos.
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What??? What does this even mean?
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+Adam Liss​ Yeah, that's what I meant by the 'spice up with mysticism' bit.

The whole idea of the word 'consciousness' in the context of that phrase is just dumb. It's just a load of woo wrapped in the remnants of a good life lesson.
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Hanging up on annoying telemarketers is the easiest way to deal with them, but that just sends their autodialers onto the next unfortunate victim. Roger Anderson decided that telemarketers deserved a crueler fate, so he programmed an artificially intelligent bot that keeps them on the line for as long as possible.
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Check out Lenny:

https://youtu.be/XSoOrlh5i1k
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+blanche nonken, I considered it done the moment the distinct flavor of tootsie roll was first liberated from its hardened sugar prison. And due to the absence of perfect spheres of common center point, attack vector is also a parameter of concern. I recommend a minimum of 100 lickers, licking from blind attack angles, to find a publishable average number of licks.
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Adam Liss

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This is Track 9 at New York Penn Station, every morning. Construction has closed at least one staircase and blocked most of the walkway, leaving just a narrow pathway along the edges of the platform.

It's been this way for months.

I wonder what the fire-safety plan might be.
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They need to do something about that shaking floor, too.
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This explains everything!

Or, "Daddy, why do I need to learn science?"
The early 21st-century has seen a remarkable intensification in feline ownership. These animals are no longer casual bystanders in our eco-systems. They have passed that tipping point to become a glo...
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I, too, am immune to chemtrails. Perhaps I am a cat?
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I think this depends on how you choose to multitask. Specifically, it depends on when you change tasks and what you were doing when you changed. In computer science this is called "context switching," and the analogy is fairly accurate.

When a computer switches away from the current task, it needs to save its state: all the data that was in memory, where in the program it was executing, and so on. Then, when it resumes, it needs to re-load everything, and it may also need to restore or verify the state of any additional hardware it was using.

That's expensive: the more time it takes the computer to save and restore state, the less time it can spend doing what you actually want it to be doing.

Our brains work the same way, except that we can't "swap out" our thoughts as easily. Sure, we can write them down, but it's not the same: we don't always know consciously what was in our mind, so we don't always know what we need to write down. Worse, restoring state is even harder. Think about the times you've been interrupted in the middle of a task, or of a thought, then tried to remember what you were about to do, or what you were thinking when you were interrupted. A great example of this is being interrupted while you're trying to do mental arithmetic. I usually need to start over from the beginning.

But you can make multitasking work for you by choosing appropriate times for context switches. Most tasks fall into smaller "chunks" of work that require you to remember little or no state between them. If you're writing a letter (do people still do that?) you can finish the letter itself, and then do something else before you look for a stamp, an envelope, and your address book. If you're making coffee, you can measure the grounds and the water before you start to brew.

What you don't want to do is stop writing your letter mid-paragraph, or stop measuring your coffee part of the way through. On the other hand, if you need something else from wherever you keep your stamps and envelopes, you can "bundle" the tasks by getting everything in one trip.

So it's all in the timing, and in the ability to control when you switch tasks.
 
Many people believe themselves to be multitasking masters, but could it all be in their heads?
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Lisa Borel's profile photoPaul Hartzer's profile photoG. Wade Johnson's profile photoMarc Baker's profile photo
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It's also worth remembering that the computer equivalent of what most people call multi-tasking, preemptive multitasking is not about speed, it's about responsiveness. We choose to waste time with context switches, in order to not to have to wait as long to service interrupting events.

Humans and single core computers are both slower at preemptive multi-tasking. This is why +Adam Liss 's analogy works well for those who can keep a small number of lower priority tasks available for when our "main process" blocks. When you are blocking anyway, the context switch is not nearly as expensive.
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C'mon, you gotta give them credit for this one. I almost want to make a donation for the sheer comedic value. Maybe in Monopoly money.
 
Nigerian scammers get a space program

The latest scam email out of Nigeria involves a Nigerian astronaut stuck in space who needs millions of dollars to return home.

This is awesome:

http://www.anorak.co.uk/428124/money/nigerian-astronaut-lost-in-space-needs-3m-to-get-home-could-be-a-scam.html/

#spam #scam

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 
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Lauren Weinstein's profile photoAdam Liss's profile photoKM opalhopeful96 KM opalhopeful96 (opalhopeful96)'s profile photo
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+Adam Liss O.K. where to send Am r rican dollar? Not to prohibit progez. 👅💦😏
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"Dad, why do I need to learn math?"

So you won't promise to pay your customers 7 times as much as your competition charges them.
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Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Engineer, Puzzle Fanatic, Incurable Punster. Armchair cryptographer, security and privacy advocate. Insatiably curious about the world and its inhabitants.
Introduction
I am a natural experimentalist.  I love to learn, to innovate, and to make new mistakes.  I rarely take myself seriously; there are far more appropriate subjects to be serious about.

I find humor and puzzles in the ordinary, laugh at math jokes, and tend to cram far too many thoughts into one sentence. I'm fascinated by languages and smitten by the beauty and utility of American Sign Language. Bad grammar drives me nuts. 

I'm fond of teaching through analogy and counter-examples, asking silly questions, and gentle teasing.  Sometimes I make stuff up just to watch the gears turn in someone's head.  Whether you're a child or an adult, I'll show you that even "hard" subjects like math and science can be easyand funto learn.  If you think that's nuts, it's because you've been taught wrong.  I'll prove it to you. Try me.

I have an extremely low tolerance for willful ignorance, illogic, and baseless "alternative" explanations for the way the world works.

A 3-year-old gave up asking me "Why?" before I ran out of answers.

I'm terribly shy but have always found it easy to make people laugh.  Often at me.  And not always intentionally.  Childhood friends still tell me I'd have made a great stand-up comedian or psychiatrist; I can't help wondering how those talents are related.  But I'm sure we're all better off leaving that question unanswered.

Will work ... no ... have worked for chocolate.

How did you find me? If you added me to your circles and don't know me personally, I'd love to know what caught your interest!
Bragging rights
I have the best coworkers on the planet.
Work
Occupation
I disguise magical, complicated technology as simple, everyday tools.