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Adam Liss
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Adam Liss

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Americans are required to register if they want to vote; as of this week, Oregonians will have to register not to.
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Upon its founding, only white men of property had that right. It took years for the rest of us to be regarded by the legislature as full citizens. Even now, there are many who would prefer it if only people like themselves had the right to vote. 

The fight goes on.
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No Republican President has ever been inaugurated during any "hottest month on record."
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so it was hotter in July than in June?! Surprise, surprise...
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This is exactly why I admire Senator Al Franken: because he's diligent enough to follow up on what "studies show," he's smart enough to see through faulty claims, and he's matter-of-fact enough to call people out when they misrepresent the facts.

http://youtu.be/318DYr_K8J4
 
In other words, we have the perfect brew for yet another moral panic to cloud our collective judgment. Due process exists to protect people from mob rule and moral panics, as well as to protect us from those who would stoke those panics for their own political purposes. Claims of support from “studies” for extraordinary and yet oh-so-convenient claims need much more careful scrutiny – and perhaps much more pointed skepticism.
The most obfuscating and misleading arguments made in debate of any kind usually begin
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Yes, but rape and sexual assaults are severely under-reported-on campuses and everywhere else. No one study should be cited without a review of others...
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"I do not believe that just because you're opposed to abortion, that that makes you pro-life. In fact, I think in many cases, your morality is deeply lacking if all you want is a child born but not a child fed, not a child educated, not a child housed. And why would I think that you don't? Because you don't want any tax money to go there. That's not pro-life. That's pro-birth. We need a much broader conversation on what the morality of pro-life is."

Exactly.

h/t +Katey Springle Lempka​
In one simple quote, Sister Joan Chittister, O.S.B. sums up the hypocrisy in the 'pro-life' movement: "I do not belie...
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Talmai, I think you're starting from the assumption that the child is wanted, that the mother will take care of herself well enough that she won't damage the fetus irreparably, and that there will be a certain availability of food, care, and safety on the outside of the womb.

Assuming you can judge another person's situation and competence from your armchair better than they can from their own direct experience, is a claim I find quite presumptuous, especially if you're unwilling to offer assistance after mandating that the birth should occur.
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Hooray for Texas. Again.
 
And..your moment of Zen. 
The shooting victim from Cass County was taken to a local hospital to be treated for minor injuries. here is no word at this time on the armadillo's status.
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Karma strikes again!
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Imagine that: it seems the media and the public have distorted the truth. Huh.
 
quote: The most up to date tally of mass shootings in the U.S. shows that there have been 207 mass shootings in 2015 so far (where "mass shooting" is defined as four or more people shot in one incident). Shooting Tracker, "the world's only crowdsourced mass shooting tracker," provides the best record of these atrocities. While aimed at the U.S.'s overly generous gun policies, the site is revealing in at least one other regard: of the 207 mass shootings so far this year, precisely 1 (the July 16, 2015 Chattanooga murders) was committed by a Muslim. The other 206? It's hard to tell because many suspects have not been identified. But, and here's the point, they are not identifiably Muslim and Islamic terrorism was not identifiably the motive.

Caveat: these statistics omit the May 3, 2015 Garland, TX shooting because it was not, by definition, a mass shooting (the only casualties were the two Muslim perpetrators).

Beginning with the links provided by Shooting Tracker, my analysis of the media coverage related to each mass shooting revealed a pattern. For every non-Muslim shooting suspect, the media never mentioned their religion. Moreover, in nearly every case, it was claimed that the mass shooters were suffering from some sort of mental instability. These suspects were often ostracized from both society and family, deeply depressed and suicidal. People thusly afflicted, given easy access to guns, sometimes kill people, lots of them. Then they either turn the gun on themselves or perish in a hail of anticipated bullets. Crazy, right?

Yet the media immediately identified the motivation of Mohammad Youssef Abdulazeez when he recently killed five U.S. soldiers in Chattanooga: radical Islam. Unlike the preceding 206 mass shooters, his religion was not ignored; his religion was the only thing that mattered.

Reports have emerged, however, that Abdulazeez was a drug and alcohol abuser with a history of mental illness. He was ostracized from his family and friends; a loner with little hope. Probably suicidal. But, based on exactly two ambiguous blogposts, Abdulazeez has been repeatedly called "a devout Muslim" and his shootings a terrorist act. He wasn't crazy, we are assured, he was a Muslim. Honestly, though, a devout Muslim? Hardly. Terrorist? Who knows? He died before anyone could question him.
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Though a lurid statistic, this is fantastic and eye opening.
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Probably a bit alarmist and overstated (remember the Wi-Fi Sense fiasco that fizzled?), and I can't confirm because I can't remember the last time I used Windows, but there are instructions to disable whatever you've unknowingly and automatically opted into. Hiybbprqag, and all that.
Windows 10 is amazing. Windows 10 is fantastic. Windows 10 is glorious. Windows 10 is faster, smoother and more user-friendly than any Windows operating system that has come before it. Windows 10 i...
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+Adam Liss Peer-to-peer plausible deniability malware distribution is the best malware distribution.
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"Almost all women—and therefore men—use a form of birth control at some point in their lives, yet contraception is so politically and legally radioactive that legislators and pharmaceutical companies avoid funding it. So it’s no coincidence that the money behind the Colorado initiative, the St. Louis study, and Liletta all came from an unnamed philanthropic source—they all were from the same discreet foundation. Very few people will discuss The Anonymous Donor on the record, but tax filings, medical journal disclosures, and an archived interview with a foundation official show the funds come from Warren Buffett, the chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway, and his family."

In the past decade, the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation has become the most influential supporter of research on IUDs and expanding access to the contraceptive
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A smart move +Warren Buffet
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This article has both links to some great studies as well as suggestions. I'll add one more suggestion: avoid interrupting. If you're running a meeting, you're responsible for making sure that people have a chance to speak and aren't just spoken over.

But what I found even more interesting than the article itself was the Hacker News comments, like tracker1's [2]:
Wrt the pipeline, I have to agree to a large extent. I admit it, I'm biased on a lot of levels, not really against gender, but I will admit I prefer to work with men.

Many of the responses were knee-jerk responses that were directly addressed by the results quoted in the article.

[1] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9959217
[2] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9960061
According to the Harvard Business Review, 41% of women working in tech eventually end up leaving the field (compared to …
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I like diversity, and a professional workplace can be great and inclusive. Sad loss for us all...
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Engineer, Puzzle Fanatic, Incurable Punster. Armchair cryptographer, security and privacy advocate. Insatiably curious about the world and its inhabitants.
Introduction
I am a natural experimentalist.  I love to learn, to innovate, and to make new mistakes.  I rarely take myself seriously; there are far more appropriate subjects to be serious about.

I find humor and puzzles in the ordinary, laugh at math jokes, and tend to cram far too many thoughts into one sentence. I'm fascinated by languages and smitten by the beauty and utility of American Sign Language. Bad grammar drives me nuts. 

I'm fond of teaching through analogy and counter-examples, asking silly questions, and gentle teasing.  Sometimes I make stuff up just to watch the gears turn in someone's head.  Whether you're a child or an adult, I'll show you that even "hard" subjects like math and science can be easyand funto learn.  If you think that's nuts, it's because you've been taught wrong.  I'll prove it to you. Try me.

I have an extremely low tolerance for willful ignorance, illogic, and baseless "alternative" explanations for the way the world works.

A 3-year-old gave up asking me "Why?" before I ran out of answers.

I'm terribly shy but have always found it easy to make people laugh.  Often at me.  And not always intentionally.  Childhood friends still tell me I'd have made a great stand-up comedian or psychiatrist; I can't help wondering how those talents are related.  But I'm sure we're all better off leaving that question unanswered.

Will work ... no ... have worked for chocolate.

How did you find me? If you added me to your circles and don't know me personally, I'd love to know what caught your interest!
Bragging rights
I have the best coworkers on the planet.
Work
Occupation
I disguise magical, complicated technology as simple, everyday tools.