Profile

Cover photo
Adam Liss
1,376 followers|919,926 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Data Analysis Challenge

What does this (fictitious) data tell you...

... about the relationship between coffee and anxiety?

... about the number of coffee drinkers?

... about the experimental design and methodology?

... about anything else?

Two of the most important and difficult concepts in scientific experimentation are the ability to design unbiased and informative experiments, and the ability to understand what the data are really telling you.
 
Thought some of you might like this.  My epidemiology homework!  What are your thoughts?!
2 comments on original post
2
blanche nonken's profile photoEric Shaw's profile photoShaun Le Conte's profile photoEric Mintz's profile photo
6 comments
 
Is the data self-reported? If so, it may simply meant that coffee drinkers admit more readily to anxiety than nondrinkers.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Genius.
13
3
Adam Liss's profile photoRobyn Miller's profile photoRyan Toxopeus's profile photoYour Daily Dose of Jillish's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Randall Munroe​ is the master of the information-packed infographic. His signal-to-ink ratio is about the highest I've seen, with no sacrifice in clarity even on a log-log scale.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
So, anti-vaxxers, did we not wash off smallpox until after 1928? And what a coincidence that we learned how to wash off the microbes that cause each of the childhood diseases just as the vaccines were introduced.
9
1
blanche nonken's profile photoAdam Liss's profile photoChristof Harper's profile photoTerry Poulin's profile photo
16 comments
 
+Adam Liss ah. We add a machine shop and goat ranch to the standard mix :)
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Every group of people has a set of skills that they think of as fundamental -- but what those skills are tends to change a lot, depending on where, and especially when, you are. Here are the skills that, if they do survive in the future, may be so fundamentally changed that we can no longer even recognize them.
View original post
5
Rodford Smith's profile photoChris Blackmore's profile photoBen Heathorn's profile photo
3 comments
 
cursive hasn't been needed since we got rid of the class political system because Church and nobleman where taught cursive to show that they were better than the common folks

I myself learned it in 3ed grade then i haven't used it again. I don't even use it for my signature (the only writing I've done in 8 years)
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
How is it possible for someone to be this wrong and still keep his job as director of the NSA and "commander of the US Cyber Command" (yes, that's a thing, apparently: http://www.arcyber.army.mil/org-uscc.html).

He gets it completely wrong about backdoors in the very first paragraph of the article:

"The National Security Agency director, Mike Rogers, on Monday sought to calm a chorus of doubts about the government’s plans to maintain built-in access to data held by US technology companies, saying such “backdoors” would not be harmful to privacy, would not fatally compromise encryption and would not ruin international markets for US technology products."

would not be harmful to privacy: We've already seen how harmful they are. Countless examples of unauthorized government snooping notwithstanding, anyone who understands security knows that a backdoor for the good guys is also a backdoor for the bad guys. For a long time, this was a primary source of compromise.

would not fatally compromise encryption: Has he already forgotten the elliptic-curve brouhaha? The intentionally weakened random-number generator that makes it possible to determine the entire sequence from 32 bytes fo output? (http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/11/the_strange_sto.html) Or does he have a private, intentionally weakened definition of "fatally"? 

would not ruin international markets for US technology products: Perhaps because the NSA has already done than.

Sigh.
Mike Rogers mounts elaborate defense of Obama’s cybersecurity strategy and seeks to calm doubts about built-in access to companies’ data
15
Erin Pierce's profile photoAmanda Walker's profile photoLauren Weinstein's profile photoJames Taylor's profile photo
12 comments
 
+Lauren Weinstein​​ There job is NSA... I don't care what their views are about what they can do or think the might be able to do. I care what they do. They do-it is their job that requires their acting. I doubt individuals at the NSA make a project, get it funded, and get it approved without Agency action-thus systemic and job related.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is an interesting read, complete with references. While I don't agree with all of the author's opinions (specifically about never finding the causes of certain conditions), I commend the thoughtfulness and wish we would all shout this from the rooftops:

"What our society needs is stop pointing fingers, quit all the conspiracy crap, and instead sit at the table and discuss better health practices that don't put profits first but health and good care instead."
 
My +ScienceSunday post comes late today because I was away all day and could only sit down and write it now. 
Because I work on HIV vaccine design, lately I've often been involved in debates concerning the safety of vaccines. I have the greatest respect for parents who struggle with disabilities of any kind, especially in children. I'm a parent too and can't even imagine what life is like when your ...
43 comments on original post
10
James Taylor's profile photoE.E. Giorgi's profile photoJenny Depew's profile photo
23 comments
 
The Bt toxin in GMO food is nontoxic to humans but may be toxic to our gut bacteria, that might be part of the problem too.

I avoid Bt GMO foods because of an autoimmune thyroid condition, the symptoms flair up visibly when I eat many processed foods. I'm a canary in a coal mine with hx of migraines and environmental chemical sensitivity type symptoms
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,376 people
hari harish's profile photo
Bright, Shiny Objects!'s profile photo
Zoran Lazarevic's profile photo
Christopher Dreyer's profile photo
Judi Pegram's profile photo
Myles Jordan's profile photo
Igör Gä's profile photo
barbara willoughby's profile photo
Adil Majeef's profile photo

Communities

11 communities

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another excellent article about the appeal of anti-science, which sadly hasn't changed much in half a decade.
As another wave of stories about vaccination dominate the media, we're revisiting WIRED's 2009 cover story on the subject---An Epidemic of Fear---that laid out the debate and analyzed how unjustified and unscientific thinking was fueling a growing anti-vaccine moment.
7
2
Lisa Borel's profile photoKam-Yung Soh's profile photoTodd Sanchez's profile photo
 
It seems my measles vaccination has worn off. I am getting another one.
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
TL;DR: Make it possible for people to spend money, and the economy will improve.
The next time your right-wing family member or former high school classmate posts a status update or tweet about how taxing the rich or increasing workers' wages kills jobs and makes businesses leave the state, I want you to send them this article....
13
7
Alessandro Ebersol's profile photoTorsten Schommer's profile photoDon Denesiuk's profile photoRobert Miller's profile photo
5 comments
 
#ISavedYouAClick  "this billionaire governor" == "Minnesota governor Mark Dayton".
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nobody expects the side-channel attack.

Those who wish to compromise your security don't need direct access to the data they want. Instead, they can use other signals--battery consumption in this case--to deduce the information they're looking for.

Think about it for a moment:  how many ways do you get information indirectly? You know it's raining if your coworkers arrive wet. You know a car's just been driven if the hood is warm. And sometimes you can tell there's a commercial on TV because you hear the fridge open.
 
Phones can be tracked by battery use http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-31587621
Android phones can be tracked without using their GPS or wi-fi data by studying their power use over time, a study finds.
1 comment on original post
9
2
Eric Shaw's profile photoGregory Marton's profile photoZeke Cao's profile photo
 
So the constant short-circuit applied to the battery by Lollipop is a security feature?
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
It's funny that certain symbols are such an intrinsic part of our culture that it doesn't occur to us that they're actually recent inventions, and that they didn't exist a few decades ago. A world without the peace symbol is as incredible to me as a world without circles.

And here I always thought it was Mercedes and ... oh, never mind.
 
Do you know what the peace symbol represents?
On this day, 21 February 1958, the peace symbol design was completed. It was commissioned by the British Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. The three lines inside the circle represent the simplified semaphore letters "N" and "D", for Nuclear Disarmament.

Semaphore is the system of using flags to send information great distances, such as from one ship to another ship. "N" is formed by a person holding a flag in each hand and pointing it toward the ground at a 45-degree angle. "D" is formed by a person holding one flag straight down and one straight up.

Check out the 19 #NobelPeacePrizes awarded within the field of arms control and disarmament: http://goo.gl/QvDSf7                      
8 comments on original post
11
1
Andy Dillon's profile photo
 
Damn, that's interesting. I always thought it emerged from Flower Power. 
Add a comment...

Adam Liss

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"""
In this bewildering world we have to decide what to believe and how to act on that. In principle that’s what science is for. “Science is not a body of facts,” says geophysicist Marcia McNutt, who once headed the U.S. Geological Survey and is now editor of Science, the prestigious journal. “Science is a method for deciding whether what we choose to believe has a basis in the laws of nature or not.” But that method doesn’t come naturally to most of us. And so we run into trouble, again and again.
"""
We live in an age when all manner of scientific knowledge--from climate change to vaccinations--faces furious opposition. Some even have doubts about the moon landing.
1 comment on original post
8
2
Mike McLoughlin's profile photoRicardo Rodrigues's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
1,376 people
hari harish's profile photo
Bright, Shiny Objects!'s profile photo
Zoran Lazarevic's profile photo
Christopher Dreyer's profile photo
Judi Pegram's profile photo
Myles Jordan's profile photo
Igör Gä's profile photo
barbara willoughby's profile photo
Adil Majeef's profile photo
Communities
11 communities
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Engineer, Puzzle Fanatic, Incurable Punster. Armchair cryptographer, security and privacy advocate. Insatiably curious about the world and its inhabitants.
Introduction
I am a natural experimentalist.  I love to learn, to innovate, and to make new mistakes.  I rarely take myself seriously; there are far more appropriate subjects to be serious about.

I find humor and puzzles in the ordinary, laugh at math jokes, and tend to cram far too many thoughts into one sentence. I'm fascinated by languages and smitten by the beauty and utility of American Sign Language. Bad grammar drives me nuts. 

I'm fond of teaching through analogy and counter-examples, asking silly questions, and gentle teasing.  Sometimes I make stuff up just to watch the gears turn in someone's head.  Whether you're a child or an adult, I'll show you that even "hard" subjects like math and science can be easyand funto learn.  If you think that's nuts, it's because you've been taught wrong.  I'll prove it to you. Try me.

I have an extremely low tolerance for willful ignorance, illogic, and baseless "alternative" explanations for the way the world works.

A 3-year-old gave up asking me "Why?" before I ran out of answers.

I'm terribly shy but have always found it easy to make people laugh.  Often at me.  And not always intentionally.  Childhood friends still tell me I'd have made a great stand-up comedian or psychiatrist; I can't help wondering how those talents are related.  But I'm sure we're all better off leaving that question unanswered.

Will work ... no ... have worked for chocolate.

How did you find me? If you added me to your circles and don't know me personally, I'd love to know what caught your interest!
Bragging rights
I have the best coworkers on the planet.
Work
Occupation
I disguise magical, complicated technology as simple, everyday tools.