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Adam Dray
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Real-world politics in the City of Brass

While it is true that IRL I am a fairly left-leaning liberal type (and my philosophy certainly guides how I run this campaign), there's plenty of room for other philosophies here.

If you want to bring Marxism in and attempt to seize the means of production, go for it.

If you want to Go Galt and turn the commune into a self-sufficient microcosm that doesn't need the outside world, have at it.
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Spirits: Living forever

Long ago, the powerful figured out that by transferring their spirit from their aging body to a fresh, young body, they could essentially live forever. The trick is that it only works well if your spirit is transferred before your body dies. You can be transferred to a new vessel after you die, but such transfers usually "reject" after months or weeks.

Life is cheap in the City of Brass, so it's not uncommon for a noble's guards to comb the back alleys looking for someone who won't be missed and kidnap them (without damaging the vessel, of course). But unwilling subjects also have a high rejection rate, measured in years, and not decades. Still, a conscripted victim makes a quick "save" when a noble finds herself dying suddenly, due to a disease or injury.

However, the vessel of a willing volunteer will sustain the hosting of a spirit until the body dies. Nobles often bring potential vessels to their home and make a grand offer. If you let me use your vessel for the rest of its natural life, I will pay your loved ones a large sum of gold, possibly take them into my household and care. Most poor folks accept.

The pauper's spirit is decanted and magic jarred, and the noble's spirit is transferred into the new vessel. Repeat for thousands of years.

Of course, this causes all sorts of legal complications around property inheritance. Noble heads of house take great care to share their power and wealth with their families to reduce the likelihood of assassination. It still happens frequently.

Heads of noble families occasionally make pacts with each other for mutual protection. If one is assassinated, the others in the pact will root out the killers and destroy them forever in some horrible way. That doesn't stop scheming children from buying people out of those pacts and doing it anyway. There's a lot of wealth and power at stake in the City of Brass.
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Chills.
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Spirits and the Dead

In the City of Brass, most everyone has a spirit inside them. Some people have more than one. In fact, when a PC "levels up," they have effectively added another spirit to their collection. The adventurer's deeds have attracted certain free spirits, who latch on and eventually submit to the adventurer's will. When these multiple spirits are in harmony, there are no issues.

When a person dies, there are rituals to make sure that their spirit (or spirits) find their way to a place of rest and peace. Otherwise, restless spirits will find a way to taunt and torment the living.

The poorest people in the City of Brass often don't have the social network required to get a proper funeral. Without those last rites, their spirits eventually wander the back alleys, confused and lost. Some can break through the world's veil and communicate with the living or at least push objects around like a poltergeist.

The Red Lantern priests blaze the streets, searching for lost spirits, and collecting them in the magical lanterns they carry. Indeed, the lanterns attract weaker spirits like moths to flame. The priests return to their Temple with these spirits, and put them into a tomb of sorts, but that structure is designed to harvest their spiritual energy for eternity, granting it to the Temple and allowing them to perform miracles.

Of course, other people want those spirits, too. Those with a necromantic bent may gather them for even more nefarious purposes. Demons can possess wandering spirits and do evil things with them.

Make sure you have funeral plans for when you die.
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Yes. That's necromancy!

Yes. That's what rich people do when they get tired of their old body. Sometimes they just kidnap a good-looking person off the street and decant your spirit into a holding jar and put gramps in your empty husk.

I dunno. I have mixed feelings. I don't want this to be V:tM. But this city is dark enough that there's room for it at a small level. They would either have some kind of weird elevated status (a noble family of undead) or bottom status.

No. I don't want V:tM.

But you know how I said "most everyone has a spirit inside them"? You can probably play one of those people who have lost their spirit, yet somehow live. I imagine these people as mopey goths. Maybe I'll call them The Sullen. Still incubating this idea-egg.
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Not Murder Hobos

One of my goals for this campaign was that the players would not fall into sociopathic play modes. That is, the PCs aren't murderhobos.

More specifically, I want the PCs (really, the players) to care about some of the NPCs they encounter. "Comrades" in the sense I use it means PCs and NPCs that live in the commune. That is: friendly people that the players should know and love.

I think I've failed to make players care in the first three sessions. That's on me, as my game structure has been "here are some problems of outside threats against the commune: fix them," and I haven't established why the commune is worth saving, other than "this is where I sleep."

So I need to update my 2d12 random problem table to focus on problems that comrades have. I have at least one of those: Hengritte is a comrade who is addicted to spirit potions, and she's doing increasingly desperate things to fund her habit. The PCs tried a little to help her but they are basically supporting her habit now (literally buying potions from her). This has to have some kind of downstream consequence, to Hengritte, but also to the other people of the commune, and probably to the local neighborhood (Kickstone).

I need to write up a half dozen comrades and use them frequently. They can help PCs and earn their way into the players' hearts.

Bad things should happen to the comrades instead of to PCs. PCs take trouble in stride, but when bad things happen to "helpless" NPCs they care about, that makes them care even more.
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They're only slightly changed to fit the setting; I'm pretty sure I'm nowhere near creative enough to come up with these. Raskolnikov is the central character of Crime and Punishment; he goes mad with guilt after killing a harmless old woman to prove to himself that he was "beyond good and evil" and therefor the Nietzschean Ubermench. (Bad translation)

Smerdyakov is the half brother of the title characters of The Brothers Karamazov. He (probably) kills their common father and frames the brother whose love interests he vaguely covets.

Pierre (proper name Pyotr, but I messed up the spelling and was forgetting his common name) is a character in War and Peace. He's sort of a voyeur/tourist among the common intelligentsia, who he romanticizes as better and wiser people than the nobles who scorn his birth. (cue Pulp's Common People) Pierre could keep noble company (and he's forced to on occasion), but his political philosophy puts him at odds with the noble traditions of Russia. He loves the progressive philosophy of mainland Europe, and will go on forever about Napoleon. He sees Napoleon's conquest breaking down social barriers, ignoring the thousands of dead in his wake and the largest army ever assembled in Europe rolling toward his home. He's an idealist who thinks that people should rise by virtue and drive rather than by birth (which makes a lot of sense for a self-important but likely disinherited bastard son with a highly limited understanding of consequences).

Then his father (who'd bought him out of trouble whenever he'd tie a policeman to a bear and throw them in the river; 19th century Moscow was apparently a very strange place) dies and leaves him a giant estate. It's a huge scandal, and he becomes a pariah among both his poor idealist friends and rich traditionalist friends. He quickly runs the estate into the ground, along with the livelihoods of thousands of serfs he's responsible for.

I imagine in the City of Brass, Pierre would still be a "tourist" that thinks its romantic to live like this. Problems begin when his father's hired goons sniff around to haul him up for a ball that he doesn't want to attend. If his father dies, his siblings target the commune to try to kill him before he can learn of his inheritance. If he does attain some measure of wealth/power, he wants to share it with his old friends, but will do it in ways that are insulting, pointless, or attract the wrong sort of attention (sending books, exotic spices, inedible/decorative animals, and noble-style clothes to the commune, but no money, no food, nor anything that people in Keystone/nearby neighborhoods would buy).

Sorry for the length of this response. The spirit of over-long Russian novels are affecting me.
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How'd you find me? What do you want to see?

If you just started following the City of Brass collection, please let me know how you found it.

Also, what aspects are you most interested in?
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What kinds of things am I posting that aren't sufficiently supported by mechanics? (That is, what do you want to see more mechanics for?)
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Random tables and encounter strengths

So every game now starts with one 2d12 roll per player. I consult my handy "what's going on in Kickstone" table and write shorthand tags for each plot on an index card. If someone duplicates a roll, I go up or down on the chart, my pick.

That generates one problem per player. These things must be solved by the end of the session, or the problems might get worse. Generally, if you totally ignore a problem, it escalates. If you work on it and make some progress but don't really resolve it, then it continues on as-is.

Another thing that escalates plots is rolling the same result at a later session. That is, if you rolled "Raving Flame Priest" last session (and didn't resolve it), and then roll "Raving Flame Priest" at a later time, then I escalate that particular plot.

For now, I've been just moving each plot to its next logical conclusion, rather freeform. I'd like to sit down and prep this better, so that each plot element has a list of 3-5 steps it takes.

Another thing I'm considering doing is having those escalation points equate to levels. The first time, it's a 1st-level problem. The second time, it's a 2nd-level problem. D&D 5e lets a party of characters face a foe that's a few levels higher than them, so this shouldn't be impossible.

However, at some point, the party may have to face a problem that is way too big for them. I will give them adequate hints to this effect, but if they go head-on, that's their (sad, poorly funded) funeral. The right way to deal with superbig problems in the City of Brass is to make Faustian deals with other superbig problems, either playing them off one another or bribing one to deal with the other (with downstream consequences to you later, as expected).

This is a sandbox. There are already NPCs and plotlines that are too tough for the group to handle directly at 1st level. For example, it should be obvious that a 1st level party cannot take on the entire Blackguard directly. The leader runs the premier crime organization in the city. Let's say he's 12th level. The Empress is probably 20th level herself. If she wants you dead and deigns to take matters into her own hands, you're going to die.

Luckily, organizations tend to delegate this shit. The leader of the Blackguard probably never hears about you refusing to pay the Black Tax. Instead, Mixia, the local Collector is missing a bag and knocks on your door to get it himself. But Mixia is a 3rd level fighter or something, and you probably should pay it. Maybe you can kill him. Then Mixia's boss, a Borough Captain, sends a lieutenant to check on Mixia, eventually figures out what happens, and knocks on your door. The lieutenant is 5th level. Maybe you kill her, too. Bully for you. Now the Borough Captain is mad, because he and the lieutenant were like family, ya know, and so he knocks on your door. He's 7th level.

The City of Brass is a giant fucking set of wheels within wheels.
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Four Hallmarks of a City of Brass Campaign

In an old 4e product, the Neverwinter Campaign Setting, there was a list of "hallmarks" of Neverwinter campaign. It was a useful way to communicate what to expect from play in that setting.

So without further ado, here are the hallmarks of a City of Brass campaign:

1. Struggle

Everything is hard. Characters start out poor and unequipped. The entire world is against them. Even simple tasks usually taken for granted in typical "adventure" campaigns are hard in the City of Brass: eating, finding a place to sleep, talking to people.

2. Urban

The City of Brass setting is--unsurpringly--an urban environment. The city is the destination, not a home base used for expeditions out into the wilderness. Characters do not leave the city. Ever. The city itself is dangerous and a kind of wilderness of its own. There is much to explore, geographically and politically. There is much unknown and "wild" here, too.

3. Social Issues

The heroes in the City of Brass are concerned with issues of social justice, either for themselves or for others they care about. The "monsters" they fight, more often than not, are the wheels of systemic oppression and the selfish people who benefit from society off the backs of the underclass. The games will explore problems of social class, racism, immigration, organized crime, poverty, corporatism, and religious zealotry.

4. Activism

A theme of the City of Brass is that problems get worse if you don't do something about them and that the little guy has power to change things, whether through small, local acts or larger, political acts. Whether PCs start violent revolutions, organize peaceful protests, or just quietly help people in need, the world is a better place for their actions.
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We've had two scenes in three games where we rolled initiative.

One was a sorcerer PC vs. fire-and-brimstone cleric NPC that involved some spellthrowing and it ended quickly (violently, but not fatally).

The other was when two roguish types tried to steal stuff from well-guarded surveyors and got their asses kicked fairly badly.

Several times, PCs wisely ran or used social skills to get out of combat, even intimidating more powerful combatants.

What players need to realize fairly soon is that the can't continue to act alone in PC-style adventuring. They are small fish. They need the help of bigger fish and they need to school together with other smaller fish if they want to have a chance. There's no political organization happening (yet).
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Spirits and spells

Many people cast spells and don’t really understand the spiritual underpinnings. This doesn’t hamper their spellcasting ability.

Those in the know, however, realize that each spell is a trapped spirit that shapes magical energy in a certain way. A fireball spell is the spirit of a fire elemental. A cure light wounds spell is a small spirit from a fallen angel.

Divine spell spirits are attuned through prayer to specific temples, so those temples have control over who can use the spells.

Arcane spell spirits are wild things, found naturally throughout the world. A wizard might chase a particular spell for a while before finally figuring out how to trap it inside his mind. The process requires a combination of empathy (making one’s mind a suitable place for the spirit), trickery (luring the spirit into a trap), and power (holding the spirit in place once it’s there).

Natural spells—like the type that druids and rangers use—are spirits of the natural world. They share aspects with both divine and arcane spells. Like divine spells, they are attuned to a particular temple, except that temple is the natural environment (sometimes of a certain kind, like a particular forest or kind of tree or type of rock).

Not all spirits are spells, of course. In fact, most spirits are totally not useful for spells; they’re just lost people, or animals, or even spirits of roads or bricks. They can be useful for spiritual energy, though, and spellcasters draw energy from everything around them when they need to power up a spell.
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Sure, +Karl K! Why not? I'd really let that kind of color be up to each player.
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Low Prep City Design

What you can read under "Threats" on the campaign web site is basically most of what I know about my city. It's enough to run a whole campaign. I literally could ad lib everything from that, if I was willing to give up some of the sandboxy elements of play and switch back to my old school (circa 1988-1995) mode of play.

That older mode of play always started with a vision of a setting that was about as detailed as my initial write-up for City of Brass. The rest was created on-the-fly via stream-of-consciousness GMing. Riffing off what the players wanted to do, I might throw threats at them till one "stuck," then keep developing that.

In the sandbox mode, I prep a bit more. The encounter tables are created using that same riffing process, really. I want them to be sort of like Bangs in Sorcerer. "This thing just happened. What do you do about it?" (Even doing nothing about it says something about you, and propels elements of the setting forward.)

But let's look at what I did for the city design.

In West Marches setting design, there's probably some kind of distance-related thing going on where the nearby setting elements are low-level and the far-away setting elements are high-level. That way, 1st level PCs don't stumble into an ultra-high-level dragon encounter on the first adventure and TPK without warning. No fun.

So it's vaguely concentric circles, and the problems get bigger the further away from base you get.

In the City of Brass, the home base is the commune and the city is the wilderness. In West Marxist play, according to the rules in the "Marx & Monsters" write-up that inspired me, the city is crushingly dangerous. Everything out there wants to oppress you or take advantage of you somehow.

My city's concentric circles have a geographic component, too.

* the commune at the center
* the immediate neighborhood block
* the little neighborhood, Kickstone
* Ash Borough, ruled by an "elected" captain
* the two halves of the city, upper and lower, literally divided by a huge cliff face
* the entire city, ruled by an empress
* the wilderness around the city (a vast, rocky desert on one side, and a harsh sea on the other)

These geographic divisions have political divisions that go with them. Each of them is ruled by a bureaucracy that presses down on the ones below it. I've named some of the NPCs that control these and thought a little about their motivations, but they're all generally bad: greed, power, corruption, control.

There are other divisions, too, that are important. Social caste is a clear division, and the PCs are at the "center" of it, as in, the bottom:

* the poorest of the poor: squatters and other homeless (outcasts)
* the poorest laborers with houses or apartments, probably living in a place like Kickstone (lower lower class)
* crafters and other skilled workers who do repetitive jobs; also soldiers (upper lower class)
* artisans with more skill, controlled by the guilds; also lower priests (lower middle class)
* merchants and people with important skills; also upper priests (upper middle class)
* wealthy guild members and bankers who largely don't work anymore (lower upper class)
* minor nobility (middle upper class)
* major nobility; royalty (ruling class)

Each social layer presses down on the ones below it, too.

What this does for me, in prep, is limit what I have to think about. When I'm populating the random problems table with hooks, I don't have to concern myself with all of the city or all of the social divisions--only the ones the PCs are likely to interact with. That's more or less the ones nearby them.

For example, the Kickstone residents are getting angry at the commune because comrade Hengritte is selling their teens spirit potions (to fund her own habit). There's a group of Kickstone residents who get called "The Betters" who want the squatters / commune out of their neighborhood. Those are Kickstone problems.

Then there's the organized crime syndicate, the Blackguard. Even though that group is a city-wide thing, there's a very low-level Blackguard foot-soldier who collects Black Tax from the local businesses. So the PCs might deal with the 1st-level version of a 20th level threat.

The Masons Guild is lower-upper-class organization. The PCs cannot survive a direct confrontation with the Guild. Let's say its leader is 15th level. They are interested in the property in Kickstone and have sent 3rd level people to look into it. The PCs tried to pickpocket those surveyors last session and got their asses kicked by their guards.

By thinking in terms of these layers, I can project any organization down to the right threat level and add a plot hook that will draw the players into city intrigue that they won't be able to really deal with until they're high level (and maybe not even then).

They can deal with the local effects, but maybe not the global cause, if you follow.
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Seeds for Planting: Magic Jars and Dream Control

TheLoneAmigo over at Rocket-Propelled Game, the blog that started me on this path, has some other posts about his "Marx & Monsters" city. Here are the seeds I'll be stealing.

"*Body-theft*: The wealthiest amongst the elite of the City can live forever by buying up the bodies of young criminals and debtors. Either consciousness can be transferred across bodies, leaving the poor in the broken near-corpses of City elders while they cavort in young and shapely forms, or the City's elite are in fact mental parasites that subdue the consciousness of their hosts."

This isn't much different than some ideas I've borrowed from books like Altered Carbon and transplanted into my old Saberpunk campaign. It fits this setting pretty well, I think. This is just the punk side of the equation: the characters are too poor to really enjoy all the magitech elements that the city has to offer the richest of the rich.

In the City of Brass, sometimes your body gets stolen, but they have to put your spirit somewhere to make room for the new host. If they don't, your spirit will roam (as spirits are wont to do) and cause problems. Generally, they magic jar you and stick you in a vault somewhere.

If you're down on your luck, you can rent your body out temporarily. Wealthy merchants and obscenely rich nobles pay top price for a beautiful vessel or a muscular gladiator's body to inhabit for a night of fun. They'll return it mostly like they found it, they promise.

Debtor's prison is handled this way, too. Pay off your debts by keeping some rich old person alive a few more years.

More serious crimes might result in longer sentences.

If you're a magic user of some kind, your brain is more valuable than your body. In this case, they will rent out your physical body and transplant your spirit into a sort of machine and keep it running some set of spells or rituals for years, like enchanting Light wands over and over for sale at the market. If you're lucky, you won't lose your mind. You'll never want to cast Light again though.

You can sell spell slots permanently. Basically, they figured out how to "mine" your arcane powers. Every day, you'll cast Light for them once, and you won't even remember doing it. You just don't have that spell slot. In exchange, you get a small payment. It's sickeningly small--like 2 silver pieces or something--but if you're hungry...

"*Dream control:* Even in deepest sleep, oppression cannot be escaped. The shadowy guardians of the City walk through the dreams of the sleepers, searching for hints of rebellion and seditious thoughts. Sleepers can even be forced to work off their debts in dream-labours towards mysterious ends."

Daaaaaamn.

In the City of Brass, there are lots of ways that the powers-that-be watch its citizenry. Oculars (floating eyes) are the drones of this fantasy setting. Most are small little white things, poking into your business when you're buying eggs or peeking in your house window. It's illegal to damage them.

There are bigger ones, though. Huge, oppressive eyeballs dripping with fluids, thrumming with the magic that makes them hover in the air. They can see through walls.

The ones called Nightpiercers can get into your dreams. In the City of Brass, you don't pray to the gods for your soul to keep. You pray that your dreams will be peaceful and not give away your plans, real or imagined, as you can be arrested for fantasizing about killing the Empress, and it'll be up to you to prove you weren't really planning it.

They do more than see, too. Some of them have tentacles for grabbing you or thin eyestalks that can shoot paralysis beams or destructive rays. Luckily, these Death Glares are rare and maybe only the stuff of legend.
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Halflings

In the City of Brass, halflings are humans who have evolved for impoverished, oppressed conditions in rough urban environments.

The city has been here for a hundred thousand years. Halflings are some of the oldest inhabitants of the city, and may have built it--in service to some powerful sorcerer or overking, probably. They were just humans back then.

Over time, those humans adapted to being poor. They ate less, they lived in smaller quarters, they tried harder not to be noticed. Otherwise, they died. That kind of evolutionary pressure created the halflings of today: small, unassuming people who love food but need little of it, who can sleep anywhere, who have come to grips with being the underdog yet despise tyranny.

The city has older, smaller homes with stories only 5 feet in height. Comfortable for a halfling but uncomfortable for humans and elves. Dwarves are fine in halfling buildings.

There are wealthy halflings these days, but no halfling nobility. Most are still poor. They're treated as substandard people. Even their name is demeaning ("half people") but not the worst slur. They prefer Voudra (adjective: Voudran), meaning "Builders." They're extremely proud of their heritage as the builders of the city.

Halflings don't have pointed ears or unusual features. They are just small, proportional humans, just under 3 feet tall. Halflings do not prefer to walk barefoot, but their feet have naturally adapted to going without shoes, so many often do (usually because they cannot afford shoes). Halflings can be hairy, in general; this helps them stay warm. Because their feet are hairy, people often assume that only their feet are hairy, but this isn't the case.

Game Mechanics:

All normal Halfling traits apply, except as below:

Ability Score Increase: Your Constitution score increase by 2. Not Dexterity.

Skill Proficiency: Halflings automatically get proficiency in one of these skills: Survival, Stealth, or History.

Age: Halflings age like normal humans.

Social Encounters: Halflings have Disadvantage on all rolls involving social status, except when they are interacting only with another halfling.

Food and Shelter: Halflings reduce their Exhaustion level by 1 for effects due to lack of food or poor shelter.
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The Nature of Evil

In the City of Brass, Evil is a thing. Real evil. Evil with a capital E.

Citizens like to talk about how the nobles are evil, or the empress is evil, or the byzantine government is evil, or this or that general is evil. That's not what I'm talking about.

I'm talking about demons. Some call them daemons, devils, or old ones, and a host of other names. They're all the same thing. They're not from here and they're Evil.

See, nobles and empresses and government workers and generals--that is, people--have free will. They can do evil things. They can do evil things all their life, in fact, and one day choose to change their lives and do something better. Maybe, in the long balance of life, they might make up for the evil they have done. Probably not, but people sometimes try.

Demons don't have free will. They are forces of the universe, or tools of terrible evil deities who are themselves forces of the universe. Demons are Evil by nature.

There are more kinds of demons than are countable by sages, but suffice it to say that there are varieties of demons and each variety has a different Evil purpose. One kind might concentrate on creating mayhem and chaos. Another might want to kill people directly. Subtler varieties are invested in tempting people to do terrible things themselves: treason, infidelity, theft, murder, false witness, cruelty.

Some say that the City of Brass is run by demons. I don't think people would ever allow that to happen, and the demons know it. More likely, the there are tempter demons at work, offering power to the Empress and the nobles, making them believe they deserve everything they can take, even at the expense of most of the people in the City of Brass. When you're born into power, it's easy to believe the story the demons sell you. People have free will, remember, so it's not like they don't get to choose to be better. There's always a choice, and always consequences.

Demons often tempt average people, too, giving them a path to easy power so that they rise to challenge the status quo. Always working toward a demonic agenda, or why would a demon bother? Demons are crafty and sly, but they eschew complicated scenarios that make people think they're doing Good things just so those things can turn out to be Evil. Demons are proud of the force of nature they represent, so they don't pretend to be otherwise. The cost of a demon's temptation never looks like something else. It's always, "Yeah, if you do this terrible thing for me, I can give you power." That's the price the universe exacts in exchange.

Just don't be surprised if one day, when you're alone, a demon sidles up to you and makes you an offer.
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While it's a fascinating philosophical question, I don't think that City of Brass play benefits from me having a firm answer. I don't even think I need to know to GM it.

My gut feel is that it is very hard to take free will away from someone. It takes a lot of time and energy to strip it. People are born with it innate, regardless of their circumstance, and situation alone isn't enough to remove it--but maybe it makes people more susceptible to lose it?

I think that doing unpalatable things for food and safety doesn't actually erode your free will. Every day you make a choice to eat, or to keep your kids safe, and there is honor in that.

The kind of "black hole where you can't see free will anymore" is the thing where someone really powerful does terrible things because of lies they chose to believe, and now they tell themselves those lies. They have eroded their own self-esteem and are in such a deep hole of the bullshit they tell themselves that they can't ever find a way out of that.
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Introduction
Software developer, role-playing game player/designer/editor, devoted husband.

RPG interests: D&D (all editions), OSR, cyberpunk, SF, indie games, game design

Science interests: applied and theoretical physics, math, astronomy, psychology, computers

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I probably want to be in all of your weird circles--unless it's knitting/craft stuff, parenting stuff, or Conservative political stuff. Definitely put me in your circles about: gaming, science, cyberpunk, liberal/progressive politics, cute animal pictures, sex, relationships, TMI, etc.
Bragging rights
Games I worked on: One Bad Egg stuff (D&D 4E supplements) * Annalise * Misspent Youth * Happy Birthday, Robot! * Tenra Bansho Zero * The Dresden Files RPG
Work
Occupation
Java Developer
Basic Information
Gender
Male