Profile cover photo
Profile photo
AccuList USA
43 followers -
Since 1988, list brokerage, direct marketing and digital marketing services
Since 1988, list brokerage, direct marketing and digital marketing services

43 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Which trends will direct mail marketers want to embrace for maximum response in 2019? We start by noting that digital era issues can actually create direct mail opportunities, as pointed out by agency Inkit. More customers are tuning out digital advertising; eMarketer estimates 30% of Internet users will use ad blockers in 2019. One way to offset the drop in digital ad effectiveness is to beef up direct mail campaigns. After all, ANA-DMA research shows that 64% of millennials would rather scan for useful information in the mail than e-mail. That engagement translates into higher response rates for mail than for any other media, with 9% for house lists and 4.9% for prospect lists in 2018. While digital ads are being ignored, digital video is booming; Cisco projects video will encompass more than 85% of U.S. Internet traffic by 2020! Direct mail doesn’t have to be left out. Thanks to print technology–QR, AR, Video-in-Print and Near Field Communication (NFC)–mail can jump on the video bandwagon. For all marketing channels, 2019 customers will expect personalized offers and a seamless experience across channels. AI is one way marketers can get a handle on messaging across channels and at different points in the buyer journey. Meanwhile, variable data printing and enhanced database targeting can deliver personalized relevant messaging for mail. Yet there are some popular printing practices that need to be ditched this year, advises agency Darwill. For example, using a 4-color master shell on which variable content is laser-printed in black and white has become old-hat given that new inkjet presses can create endless 4-color versions, including coupons varied based on a recipient’s past shopping patterns or demographics and full-color variable maps that are more personalized, eye-catching, and likely to drive leads. For more see our full blog post at http://ow.ly/AqXk30nkWyJ

Post has attachment
Nonprofit marketers making final tweaks to fundraising plans for 2019 may want to do a quick survey of this year’s top trends. NonProfit PRO magazine cites three general 2019 trends. First, nonprofits should include a commitment to story-telling, since stories create a deeper emotional connection and are remembered better than facts. The magazine urges creation of a story-telling culture via leadership buy-in, a mechanism to regularly encourage and gather stories, a story-banking method and regular and consistent story communications. “Personalization” is another marketing mantra for 2019, with success requiring clean up-to-date data and list segmentation to craft targeted messages for direct mail and e-mail. Finally, put that targeted story-telling into a video format to maximize results in a year when video is projected to represent 80% of Internet traffic. Meanwhile, the Nonprofit Tech for Good blog identifies some key digital trends to include in 2019 fundraising plans: 1) increased use of marketing automation software to create personalized appeals and engagement; 2) more focus on a recurring-gift donor base; 3) more relevant, personalized, contextual messaging based on data technologies; and 4) more disruption by commercial social media players like Facebook via removal of fundraising fees, matching funds and direct access to donor data and AI. The TrueSense Marketing blog came up with "21 Fundraising Trends and Best Practices You Need to Know in 2019" from a survey of fundraising pros. We’ll only cite a couple, starting with a prediction that Instagram, which hit 1 billion monthly active users in 2018, will become a more popular platform for nonprofits in 2019. Another prediction is that, with data breaches continuing to grab headlines and a patchwork of new state data-privacy regulations, nonprofits will face added costs and changes in data collection and storage policies. For more, see our blog post at http://ow.ly/rE4K30nfFou

Post has attachment
Social media marketers will need to hone 2019 strategies to prevent ROI erosion, and Hootsuite and Social Media Today (SMT) cite important trends. First, trust in social networks has declined. Edelman’s "2018 Trust Barometer" found that 60% of respondents no longer trust social media companies. So Hootsuite sees brands focusing more on "transparent, quality engagement" and, instead of posting the same content across multiple platforms, favoring context-specific and audience-specific messaging to reach smaller but more valuable groups. Personalization remains a key strategy, but marketers need to be open about when and why data is collected to address privacy concerns. As use of celebrity social media influencers has grown, trust in them has declined, Hootsuite and SMT report. One solution is to increase use of experts and employee advocates, per Hootsuite. SMT suggests more micro-influencer marketing. While they have followings of fewer than 10,000 people, micro-influencers have genuinely interested followers who see them as trustworthy. Meanwhile, Hootsuite predicts that "the news feed may be slowly becoming a thing of the past," as social media users increasingly prefer content in a stories format. The stories format has exploded on Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp--and is even being tested by LinkedIn. Meanwhile, social media ROI is getting tougher, making analytics and targeting more essential. A recent "Internet Trends Report" from Mary Meeker found that while click-through rates on Facebook are up 61%, CPMs have soared 112%. The good news is that the gap between social media and commerce is narrowing. Meeker’s 2018 report also showed 55% of survey respondents purchased products online after social media discovery. Shopping is now aided by in-stream payment tools, video plugins, shoppable posts, Instagram's Explore shopping tab, Facebook Marketplace and Pinterest’s Buyable Pins. For more, see http://ow.ly/pGnA30naxuk

Post has attachment
When the average U.S. adult is expected to spend more than three and a half hours a day on a mobile device and 70% of digital advertising is already mobile, it’s no surprise that 2019 is forecast to be another banner year for mobile marketing. A recent ClickZ post outlines some of the big trends to expect. For example, mobile ad fraud is on the rise, doubling year-on-year during the first quarter of 2018, so ClickZ author Luca Mastrorocco predicts that advertisers will push for supply chain transparency from vendors, increase use of anti-fraud metrics for mobile apps, and seek to engage users directly via mobile network operator rather in-app. Even with over 2 million apps in both Google Play and the Apple App store, Mastrorocco asserts that the mobile app landscape is far from saturation, citing innovations such as J.P. Morgan’s online banking app, the success of TikTok’s viral 15-second video app, and Facebook’s investment in a new Lasso app to compete with TikTok. He foresees more app innovation ahead, especially in AI and augmented reality (AR). Mastrorocco also predicts that interactive mobile experiences, such as IKEA’s new AR app allowing users to virtually place furniture in their homes, will blossom in 2019, blurring the line between mobile advertising and content. Gamification will play a central role, even among non-gaming brands. Also expect data-driven tactics to expand significantly in 2019, with increased demand for user-centric advertising that tracks performance and analyzes results in real time to optimize media and creative in-flight. See our post at http://ow.ly/Cha530n6Swe

Post has attachment
E-mail marketing is constantly evolving, and a good overview of 2019 trends was recently posted in Business2Community by Rohit Munipally. The value of e-mail targeting and list segmentation is now a must, he notes, citing HubSpot research that e-mails relevantly segmented and targeted account for 58% of all e-mail earnings and increase profits up to 18 times more. Automation further enhances e-mail power. For example, a contact who has visited a web page several times can receive relevant automated e-mails prompting action. In fact, global automated e-mail marketing is expected to account for $2.7 billion by 2025, Munipally reports. Watch for acceleration of the trend away from graphics-heavy designs in 2019. Research shows e-mail users prefer plain text over HTML-style e-mails because plain text resembles a personal message sent by a family member or friend. Also expect interactivity to grow. Response data favors interactive e-mails encouraging engagement via quizzes, surveys, games, contests, GIFs, and call-to-action messaging that lets recipients shop, edit an order, update a wish list, etc. Story-telling also has proved itself as a content-engagement tool. E-mails that begin with a story to grabs the reader and then lead into offers are very influential if delivered to a relevant audience (underscoring targeting and segmentation). Mobile optimization also will be essential in 2019, with 53% of e-mails opened via mobile devices and 75% of gmail users viewing accounts on mobile devices. And since consumers demand relevant, personalized content whether on a computer or mobile device, data use must go beyond first-name inclusion to information unique to the account or buyer persona. Plus, next year should see growing use of AI for everything. For more, see our blog post at http://ow.ly/ImFC50jWJqj

Post has attachment
As they ready for 2019, we urge B2B marketers to take the basic data steps suggested in a recent Martech Today post by Scott Vaughn. Good response depends on identifying and engaging the right audiences. Vaughn recommends starting with a smaller universe of accounts to precisely define best targets--and then testing and using advanced strategies, such as predictive modeling, to expand to more buyers. But targeting only works with quality data, so data hygiene is another necessity. When a recent DemandGen survey finds that more than 35% of the data in existing databases is unmarketable on average, avoiding wasted dollars means a "get clean, stay clean" data-hygiene effort for 2019, Vaughn urges, including regularly auditing data-capture processes and sources, using filters for data entry, and a cleansing process to eliminate records that are invalid, non-standardized, duplicate or non-compliant. With stringent data-privacy laws being deployed globally, B2B marketers must also have a proactive permission-based data plan that includes asking for opt-in everywhere and visible, clear explanations of how behavioral data is used. Meanwhile, customers have not only come to expect data privacy but also the rapid response of the digital market. Yet many B2B campaigns take two or three days to follow up on a lead or inquiry, or even longer just to get leads loaded into automation or CRM software! Vaughn proposes speeding response by identifying areas where data can be routed faster and reaction time reduced and then initiating sales and marketing training on speedier handling. Finally, the best data processes won't result in ROI if marketers focus on the wrong metrics. Vaughn notes high-performing marketing teams use insights with these ingredients: agreed-upon key performance indicators (KPIs); tools to measure performance; and easy-to-use dashboards for all stakeholders. For the full post, see http://www.acculistusa.com/weaponize-b2b-data-for-2019-with-these-tactics/

Direct mail marketers received lots of encouraging news in the 2018 “ANA-DMA Response Rate Report.” Direct mail improved its usage ranking to tie with social media as the second most-used medium (57%), for example, and continued to deliver the best response rates of any medium. In fact, “snail mail” even improved on its response success by doubling median response rates over last year to 9% for house lists and 4.9% for prospect lists in 2018. Mail’s Return on Investment (ROI) also leaped by 12 percentage points to beat out online display this year. The only negative in the report is that those surveyed continue to doubt the future of direct mail, with 19% saying they plan to decrease usage in the coming 12 months. But if the report participants follow their behavior after previous surveys, which similarly predicted mail declines, direct mail usage will remain buoyant, which allowed it to rise in 2018 despite planned cuts. One drag on direct mail continues to be its Cost Per Action/Acquisition, which is the highest CPA of any medium and puts budget pressure on mail volume, which did decline for both house and prospect lists compared with the 2017 study. However, high response rates, competitive ROI, online tracking and print-tech advances are keeping marketers loyal to “traditional” mail in a digital world. In fact, direct mail usage for marketing campaigns equals or exceeds 50% for most of the 11 industry segments cited in the study. In usage, direct mail leaders were travel or hospitality (80%), nonprofits (75%), publishing or media (71%), and financial services/banks/credit (67%). Only Technology (44%), Retail (44%), and B2B Services (34%) came in below the 50% usage mark. But when it comes to tracking those response rates, marketers have definitely gone digital, with over half of surveyed marketers (53%) saying they use online tracking capabilities, such as PURLs, followed in popularity by the use of codes or coupons (45%) and call center or telephone inquiries (41%). For data comparing response rates by type of format and B2B vs. B2B campaigns, see our website blog post at http://ow.ly/phk530mSB3y

Post has attachment
Demand for meetings and events is projected to rise worldwide next year, pushing the global market up by 10% and boosting attendance numbers in North America by 14%, according to the "2019 Meetings & Events Future Trends" report from Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT). But trade show marketers clients will still need to address new attendee expectations if they want to catch that market wave. In fact, the CWT report found that attendee experience was the concern that was top of mind for planners, including delivery and tracking of attendees through innovative applications of technology, use of unique venues, and more engaging and interactive content. Along those lines, Ryan Gould, vice president of strategy and marketing services for Elevation Marketing, recently posted about five key trends affecting 2019 attendee experience. First, he urges marketers to commit to an experiential, customer-centric booth design that goes beyond square footage and demo stations to address comfort, engagement and interaction, with a focus on a big first impression. One way to enhance experiential booth design is to create a multisensory experience, with unique lighting design, touch-panel interfaces, gamification, interactive displays, and even scent marketing that uses attractive aromas to capture visitors. Think it's nonsense? The respected Harvard Business Review concludes that amplifying the sensory qualities of your exhibit is a top way to get attendees connecting with your brand, notes Gould.When it comes to multisensory options, Virtual Reality (VR) has earned a big buzz in the trade show market. In fact, Gould points out, studies show that 53% of customers are more likely to buy from a brand that uses VR than one that doesn’t. Plus, proliferation of VR platforms has increased affordability, with VR app Google Cardboard now available for as little as $10 as an example. Since it's exhausting to spend a day walking a trade show, exhibitors who offer lounge areas are luring attendees into their booths and keeping them there for extended periods of time (including a sales pitch, of course). Savvier marketers have been adding charging stations along with comfy lounge chairs to further draw visitors. A trade show booth with a single flat-screen TV for presentations is now behind the technology curve. With technology advances, you can transform the entire space using multiple screens and unique lighting elements to direct visitors to specific displays or products. Use of 3D projection mapping can further transform a space, turning a whole wall into a 3D video image or projecting a personalized image on a prop, statue or other surface. For more, see our on-site post at http://ow.ly/eyZO30mM5xB

Performing arts marketers face many challenges in competing for attention and share of wallet in a noisy multi-channel marketplace. AccuList USA recently found some good basic advice on winning audience response in a blog post by Dave Wakeman of the Wakeman Consulting Group. Wakeman noted that creating a sense of scarcity is key to performing arts marketing--even lacking a hot-demand show like the current musical "Hamilton." Nothing attracts a crowd like a crowd! Offering all tickets prior to marketing-generated demand undermines that desired sense of urgency, but marketers can still use the secondary ticket market, such as StubHub or TicketsNow, to produce a feeling of scarcity, he advises. Performing arts marketers also need to define the audience target of a show/event and then tailor a value message that appeals specifically to that audience. Targeting and creative messaging will be very different for a family show, a political commentary, a well-known classic, or a one-off by a famous author. New attendees will need a different approach than members and donors. Certainly, many shows don't have the time for the sort of traditional agency advertising that waits for reviews to come out and then creates ads around positive lines from those reviews. Plus, that kind of reactive, critic-centered promotion can miss a more persuasive value message to win over the target audience. Finally, Wakeman notes that in today’s market, people often aren’t just going to "see a show." They are likely looking to make a night of it and are attracted to events with multiple value offers. He lauds the successful audience-building efforts of the Chattanooga Symphony & Orchestra, which promotes multiple ways to engage even for those without a dedication to the symphony. Pairing a wine tasting, art show or discussion group/lecture with a performing arts event may be just what it takes to attract a new audience or convince an existing audience to try a new entertainment option. See our on-site blog post at http://ow.ly/mYfT30mzCjQ

Business publishers come to AccuList USA for help with audience building via multi-channel campaigns, but as data experts, we'd like to remind them that their audience data offers other revenue streams worth mining. Most publishers know that targeted audience data is key to competing for ad dollars, personalization, and targeted content marketing. A recent Adweek article by Jason Downie suggests several other ways to monetize audience data. Downie urges publishers to build “off-the-shelf” audience segments that can be sold directly to advertisers, for example. Consider how a seminar promoter could use a business magazine's data if the publication built an audience of people interested specifically in his topics or proven seminar buyers; the advertiser would be able to enjoy the benefits of tapping not just a business-engaged audience but a strategically targeted set of potential buyers more likely to convert. Audience segments can also offer insights that can be further monetized. For example, analytics could show that seminar attendees are four times more likely to share content online. That makes them online influencers, and since influencers are extremely valuable, the publisher can demand a higher CPM. Additionally, an audience segment can open the door to new advertisers and marketers, including non-endemic spending. A business publisher's analytics may show a subscriber segment visits golf sites as well as the magazine site, for example. The publisher can now woo clients looking to target "golfers." Another way publishers can take advantage of data is in the RFP process, according to the Adweek article, noting that the average publisher spends up to 1,600 hours per month, or 18% of revenue, responding to advertiser RFPs. Publishers can develop a customized response to an advertiser RFP, starting with first-party data to build out the RFP-requested audience and then enriching that database with third-party data appending and digital lookalikes. Author Downie advises running a portion of an ad campaign without audience or contextual targeting to identify additional audiences who respond well. Still another option for publishers with high-quality audience data is to sell it as "second-party data," either directly to another company through a second-party data exchange or through a programmatic data exchange. And, of course, subscriber lists can be monetized as "third-party data," earning regular rental revenue on the open market and via data brokers. For more detail, see http://ow.ly/i1Yy30mvDU4
Wait while more posts are being loaded