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About Aberdeen
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What to see and do in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire Scotland
What to see and do in Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire Scotland

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HMT Aberdeen first doorman was called The Rustler. This extract from The Drummer Boy by local author C.G. Buswell describes why he was so nicknamed.
www.cgbuswell.com/drummer-boy-book.php


'You can see me?’ enquired an incredulous Scott, staring at the man he knew to be the Rustler, the first doorman of HMT who was so nicknamed for stuffing newspapers in his trousers to help keep out the chill of the Granite City. As he moved, his big shiny coat buttons twinkled off the moon as if toying with Scott’s eyes.
‘Of course sir. Not all is as it seems sir. Did you enjoy the show?’ he enquired of Scott as he replaced his hat and stood rigidly to attention.
‘Which one?’ replied Scott playfully. ‘I’ve seen two on stage and twa unfold afore ma very eyes.’
‘Very good sir, very good. She said you had a sharp wit.’
Scott stood still now, shocked and worried that the tone of conversation had taken a more sinister direction. ‘She?’ he asked hesitantly, fearful of the answer.
‘Why Naomi, of course Scott. It really was her you know,’ replied the Rustler with a twinkle in his eyes and a kind smile on his lips, ‘You didn’t think she’d leave you, did you. Her love for you was too strong and she…’
‘NO!’ interrupted Scott angrily as he reached out and tried to push the doorman from him, only remembering as he stumbled that he could not touch these phantoms, only talk and listen. As he landed in a semi-crouch on the pavement he looked across the street to see the familiar William Wallace statue, its left arm outstretched as if pointing back into the theatre, advising Scott to go back to Naomi. His right arm held proudly onto his sword. Scott ignored the inanimate statue and righted himself, just in time to jump back from a horse and carriage, the black steed dark in the dimly lit street with its gas lighting atop old fashioned lamp posts. Its clip clopping came to a resounding halt in the old cobbled street. One of the boys with the tasselled epaulettes jumped down from the rear of the carriage and raced to the foyer entrance. The Rustler, Scott all forgotten as his duty called, deftly opened the door to the ornately painted carriage to allow a smartly dressed couple to enter. She was covered in furs and he was dressed in black overcoat as protection and comfort from the harsh weather, his top hat and shiny topped stick an ornamentation of his wealth. This movement forward from the foyer to the carriage was a carefully practiced manoeuvre by the Rustler, honed with much practice so that his patrons would not get too cold or wet. He quickly pocketed his penny for his trouble from the gentleman and he shut the carriage door and ensured it was securely latched before making his way back to the Foyer to escort more VIP guests who had retrieved their hats and coats from the cloakroom attendant.
Meanwhile the carriage boy held out his hand discretely for the next gentleman to place a shiny farthing bearing King Edward VII’s face looking right onto his eager hand. It disappeared swiftly, as did the boy as soon as he had received his reward, like a thief in the night. He ran up Rosemount Viaduct, alongside a carriage heading towards the affluent part of Rosemount at the top of the hill. He cheekily glanced over his shoulder to check that Harry Adair Nelson, the Theatre manager, was not looking, and then jumped onto the tailboard for a quicker ride out to bring another empty carriage and driver for more patrons. The faster he and his fellow carriage boys could bring the carriages to the departing patrons, the more tips they would secure. Though, the Lord above help any of the carriage boys who got caught doing this strictly forbidden practice that could result in injury or death: Nelson’s wrath could be severe. His reputation, even on this opening night, was one of an ardent follower of rules and as a strict disciplinarian to those who did not follow his word and commands.
Scott looked on with fascination. He had never been privy to so many phantoms at one time. Was this Naomi’s work because she knew he loved history and his beloved Aberdeen, especially this Theatre? They had spent many a night at HMT enjoying pantomimes and plays over the years during their leave from military duties. They had even joined the Friends of Aberdeen Performing Arts scheme so that they could get discounted tickets and attend special events such as when they met the cast of An Inspector Calls. No, he thought, she was dead and not here, whatever that was, that manifestation, it was not his lover. He shook his head in an effort to clear it. William Wallace was still pointing towards the area known as Transportation, Damnation, Salvation and Education by generations of Aberdeen folk. Transportation because of the old and long gone Schoolhill Railway Station that was convenient for the delivery of hand painted large scenery canvases. Damnation because of the debauchery that was said to go on in Victorian and Edwardian theatres when actresses were often common prostitutes. Salvation for the building next door that was the soul saving South United Church and that now was St Mark’s. And lastly education for the public library that stood at the end of this row. Across from this was the actor’s haven, the Well o’ Spa Bar, which sadly closed decades ago and is now the site of the Denburn Health Centre. ‘Hospitalisation or ministration!’ thought Scott wryly, trying to get his befuddled brain to add to the weel-kent, the well-known rhyme. During this the Kemnay and Tillyfourie quarried granite twinkled away in the moonlight as if acting as aircraft guiding lights for Scott to get closer towards his father. As if remembering his destination, he turned and made his way determinedly to the Noose and Monkey, moving past the throng of opening night patrons making their way home under the watchful eye of Chief Constable Anderson and his Constables. They had been drafted in to ensure that everything went safely and under control. Scott had had enough of these theatre ghosts, the Honorary Chaplain from the Actor’s Church Union could sort them out if people still saw them, he thought. As Scott made his way through them he looked up at the central parapet at the front entrance to see the statue of Tragedy and Comedy by Mr Arrowsmith, created to match those inside His Majesty’s Theatre. Unlike William Wallace, the sword of tragedy was well gone, lost to the elements. This indicated to Scott that time was advancing, since the sword was only lost in the last few decades. Before his eyes the theatre was lit proudly with modern electric blue lights that reflected down to give a green glowing effect. The blue gas lampposts were still there, but now had electric lighting. He walked past Donald’s Way as he made it to the railings of St Mark’s Church and looked up to see the familiar smaller green hued dome, like a baby version of the HMT dome. He could hear the familiar peep peep of the Pelican crossing taking walkers to Union Terrace and was soon by the ornate low pillars of the Central Library that supported this tall Gothic-looking building that housed rows of cooing pigeons on its roof, plumped down against the elements, settling down to sleep in the dim glow of the moon. They did not hear the familiar ‘Rubidub dum’ that seemed to grow louder in Scott’s head as if marching him in step towards his father. He ignored the feathered iron blue lamps of the library steps and continued on his way past the granite dome which was in sharp contrast to the two green coppered domes. He crossed the road, no longer used by horse and carriage, but now smooth and used by modern day cars that beeped at him for daring to cross without waiting for the green man to guide him safely across.
He’d made it; he’d reached the cleverly curved granite four storied building that housed the Noose and Monkey on the corner of Skene Street and Rosemount Viaduct. He just had to squeeze through the ubiquitous smokers that seemed to hang around under a fog of cigarette smoke at every pub in Scotland’s doorways since the smoking ban. The large old fashioned pyramidal lamp above the outer doorway lighted the emberic glows of their cigarettes. As Scott stumbled through the inner doors and into the bar he sought out his father and reached out and embraced him.
‘Alright son,’ he said returning the unexpected, but welcome embrace, worried upon seeing the distress in Scott’s face before he buried it in his father’s shoulder, ‘you look like you need a dram o whisky!’
‘Nae, faither, I’ve had enough spirits tonight,’ replied Scott to his frowning father.

http://www.cgbuswell.com/drummer-boy-book.php


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Cruden Bay IT Services, in the village Post Office, offers a range of computer services which includes repairs, malware removal, wifi and internet access help, a high quality print and scan service, CV checking and computer classes.

It is run by Ray who has been the AboutAberdeen go to tech guy for over ten years and has always been able to help.

www.crudenbaytraining.co.uk

www.facebook.com/CrudenBayITS

01779 813330

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My daughter and book cover artist, Abi is exhibiting her installation We Need To Build A Wall which was inspired by the refugee crisis. Abi is about to graduate from Gray's School of Art Aberdeen and you can see her work at the Edinburgh Palette, St Margaret's House EH7 6AE from 10am to 5pm until the 18th. Go visit! https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010031627878
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Scotland’s largest Gaming Expo takes place on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th July 2017 when 4TG Game Con comes to the AECC, Oil & Gas Arena Aberdeen
The second 4TG Game Con builds on the huge success of the first gaming event of its kind to be held in Aberdeen and is now seen as the North East of Scotland's largest gaming expo.

It takes place from 10am - 8pm and the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre postcode for your sat nav is AB23 8BL.

Attendees will get the chance to enjoy 20 hours of all aspects of gaming including Esports Tournaments, VR Zone, Current Gen Zone, Retro Zone, Indie Zone, Kids Zone, Cosplay, Guest Speakers, Developer Panels, Career Zone, Youtube/Twitch Guests and much, much more!

For further information visit 4thegamers.co.uk which includes links to buy tickets.

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Congratulations to Nadya Poole who wins the AboutAberdeen pens in our recent competition. Please direct message your address and we'll get them in the post.
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Aberdeen’s graduating painting students from Gray's School of Art are exhibiting at the Edinburgh Palette, St. Margaret’s House, 151 London Road in Edinburgh EH76AE and they invite you to go along and support them and view their work.

The exhibition opening night begins with a private view on Saturday 4th March from 6-9pm. Refreshments and nibbles will be available. Thereafter the exhibition will be everyday 10am-5pm until the 18th.

This group of students have previously exhibited in Aberdeen, Skopje, Macedonia, Vienna, Austria, Tallinn and Estonia.

To see more examples of their work visit https://www.facebook.com/events/403658703300845/

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3/3/17
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We have added an Aberdeen Thai restaurant review section to aboutaberdeen.com/Thai-Food-Restaurants-in-Aberdeen where the delights of Chaophraya on Union Street/Union Terrace await readers.
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3/1/17
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Is aire onything sweeter than waking up beside the ae ye love? Happy Valentine’s Day abidy! xx
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The Trickery Cabaret Show at Underdog, on Friday 3rd March. Doors 7.30pm, show 8pm. Tickets start from £10 from https://event.bookitbee.com/10509/march-at-the-trickery/

Alan Rorrison has been a performer and creator in magic for 20 years. His unique style helped him get underground acclaim when he started to release his own material into the magic community. Alan is now one of the top consultants for stage and TV Magic around the world and working with many top names in the magic industry. In short, if you have watched a magic show in the past 10 years you have probably seen some of Alan’s work without knowing it. Of course he also loves to perform and his unique style and character landed him a spot on national television on Penn and Tellers fool us where he managed to fool Penn Jillette with his own take on a classic magic effect. He has recently completed his third world tour and regular performances at the illustrious Magic Castle.

See clips of his performances at www.alanrorrison.com and read more about Aberdeen’s Trickery at thetrickery.co.uk

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Send Aberdeenshire Artisit Karla a photo of your pet and have it painted onto a canvas, ready to hang on the wall for only £50. Includes free delivery throughout Aberdeen or the Shire. www.karlascreativecapers.co.uk/blacklabrador.asp
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2/11/17
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