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Able Lawrence
Works at SGPGIMS
Attended SGPGIMS
Lives in Lucknow
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Able Lawrence

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Baya Weaver Ploceus philippinus 
A highly social and gregarious, sparrow sized bird that frequents typha reedbeds and cultivation. They are usually seen in flocks and also nest communally in overhanging branches or palm fronds over water and depressions. Weavers are polygamous, where males build the nests to please the female. Once the female is impressed with the males craftsmanship, she accepts the suitor who is then free to make more nests and get more partners. Therefore the reproductive success of the male is dependent on his nest making skills. 
If you like reading about Birds, take a look at my collection
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QSO9a
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Hiekisokanvoonopstaeksyanideimideiste.mypievjojyismooektsideimidhiekhanrisbei virekmoehweekookanweejekhovijjyismoosokan.moe vigeedeivitmyhiskirgoenee
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Reproductive strategies of tropical and temperate birds explained by differing risks of migration and predation
While temperate region songbirds have an average clutch size of four, those in the tropics usually have two. While the nest predation risks are similar, there are added risks during the migration. While temperate birds give lower parental investments, the tropical birds invest more in fewer birds being able to provide more food to their nestlings allowing them to grow their wings faster thereby reducing predation risk. 
Age-related mortality explains life history strategies of tropical and temperate songbirds
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/349/6251/966.full
A University of Montana professor who studies birds around the world has discovered trends in how the offspring grow, how parents care for the young and how well the young survive based on where they live. Now, his songbird research is hitting the right notes with the journal Science.
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Wooow
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Origins of the Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 
When you think of evolution and its key idea of common descent, we imagine a series of branches in the tree of life where extant living things neatly descended from a distant ancestor in a neat sequence but the world is much weirder than that. Indeed the key step in the evolution of the Bakers yeast was merger event, where two different yeast strains joined together in an eternal embrace forming a hybrid cell with two sets of genome doubling its chromosome count. Then over time, the genes rearranged, lost some of the unncecessary ones and slowly transforming itself to the yeast that we know today as the Bakers yeast. 
Beyond the Whole-Genome Duplication: Phylogenetic Evidence for an Ancient Interspecies Hybridization in the Baker's Yeast Lineage
http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002220
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A little... 
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Able Lawrence

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March of the desert: California desert is man made
While periods of drought and extreme precipitation are not new to California, human activities have made it worse and has brought the fragile balance to breaking point. 
California's current extreme drought must be a lesson for managing water in a warmer, more densely populated world, say Amir AghaKouchak and colleagues.
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Greed is driving us into our own destruction.
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Megafires: Rapid changes in Northern Boreal forests spurred by climate change
Fires are not new to the black spruce that reigned over the boreal forests of North west Canada, for they are adapted to regenerate after fires but then the fires now are not the same. Unlike the fires of the earlier milleniums, the fires that rage across the drier hotter landscaps are larger than every before and burn the forest floor down to the floor leaving only ash and no biomass making it difficult for the once dominant black spruce to come back. Areas devastated by megafires are being replaced by broad leaved deciduous forests who grow faster and are more fire resistant changing the very landscape of the area. Forest Health: The New North http://www.sciencemag.org/content/349/6250/806.full
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+vaishali muzumdar Periodic fires are also needed to maintain healthy savanna grasslands, basically to kill invading trees. 
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Able Lawrence

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Chemistry goes green by slowing down
Chemistry was always about getting reactions run faster, until now but that required solvents, high temperatures and produced toxic polluting byproducts while the secret sauce for a good chemist was the right solvent. In solids and powders at room temperatures reactions run slow but they can get complicated and do stuff that are not possible in solutions. An intrepid breed of chemists are attempting to tame solid state chemistry for complicated synthesis and future looks promising and less polluting. 
Slow, solid-state reactions used by lichens and Renaissance pigment-makers could help to make chemistry greener.
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Xanthoria parietina?
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Evolutionary origins of Religion 
How did big organized religion come about. Now this is being studied scientifically. 
A new theory aims to explain the success of world religions—but testing it remains a challenge
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+Randy Curry Hinduism/Egyptian is far older than the Babylonian religion! More than likely the god-concept came from central Africa somewhere!

As you said "big, organized" religion! It's still all a destructive idea-system! War after war!
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Able Lawrence

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Expanding role of fetal microchimerism in maternal health and disease
Chimeras are animals made of parts from more than one animals. Unlike mythical chimeras of ancient legends, chimerism is very common. During pregnancy, fetal cells move into the mother (trophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells and immune cells) while maternal cells seed the fetus. The presence of a small population of foreign cells in the circulation is called microchimerism. While the absolute numbers of fetal cells in most women is very small, greater numbers are seen in those suffering from autoimmune disease like systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis or rheumatoid arthritis, their exact roles in disease causation remain unclear. (for example they can cause breakage of tolerance triggering autoimmunity). It turns out these cells can do much more than meddle with our immune system. 
Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned.
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+Martin Lewitt​ You are under estimating the amplification powers of the immune system which rival anything else in nature. Basically microchimerism can offer a way around the stringent self tolerance mechanisms. It takes only a few clones of T or B cells to proliferate big time once it gets the go ahead. 
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Cell mechanics are more complex than previously thought

'(Nanowerk News) Cell mechanics are considerably more complex than previously thought and may affect cell structures at various levels. This finding is based on a collaborative research project conducted by an international research team from ETH Zurich and University of Tampere, involving Teemu Ihalainen, a postdoctoral researcher at the Academy of Finland. The findings of the team were published in the Nature Materials ("Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension").

The research report involved the first discovery that cytoskeletal tension transmitted to a cell nucleus causes changes to occur in the structural organisation of the nuclear envelope inner lining (nuclear lamina). These very same structures bind genetic material – chromatin – thereby enabling mechanical signals to directly affect the structure of chromatin and the reading of the genes.

“Metaphorically speaking, if we think of a cell as a tent, and the tent guy lines that keep the tent erected as the cytoskeleton, then, in line with the observations we made during our project, jerking the guy lines will change the order of objects in a backpack placed in the middle of he tent. We also found that the nuclear lamina is divided into two parts, the upper and lower parts, which are structurally different,” Ihalainen says. '

http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/biotech/newsid=41149.php

Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension : Nature Materials : Nature Publishing Group  http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nmat4389.html

Confocal microscopy images of fibroblast cells of connective tissue. Cells were grown under controlled conditions into particular shapes using square or round islands 30-45µm in size to which cells were attached. The actin cytoskeleton of the cell appears green; the nucleus red.
Nanowerk is the leading nanotechnology portal, committed to educate, inform and inspire about nanotechnologies, nanosciences, and other emerging technologies
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The highest temperature of the human being was recorded of115.7 DEGREE Fahrenheit 
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Able Lawrence

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Common Iora Aegithina tiphia tiphia male
Ioras are native to tropical Asia with the center of diversity around Malaysia and Borneo. While other species geographically limited, sub-species of common ioras are found everywhere in Asia. They are small canopy dwelling birds that are better heard than seen, especially during breeding time as they blend very well into the green leaves (and they also seem to like trees with yellow flowers like Cassia fistula). They have very specific habitat requirements, as they like open forests with some bushes and undergrowth, usually not far from open water. while they utilize micro niches in both upper and lower stories. They can be easily distinguished from the rarer white-tailed or marshalls Iora (present in isolated pockets across India) by the absence of white in their tail in both sexes. 
Iora call recorded by me. https://soundcloud.com/able-lawrence/common-iora-whistle-long-742am15aug2015
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تصویری
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Mystery birds of Audubon 
John James Audubon was a pioneer bird watching in North America who catalogued the rich diversity of its avian life. He produced water color illustrations of more than four hundred birds which are a testament not only to his artistic skill but also power of observation. He painted after watching birds in the wild. While the vast majority of the birds he painted are well know today, but some of his avian subjects still remain a mystery and scientists have not been able to identify them in the wild. Theories abound from possible extinction to the birds he documented being rare mutants or hybrids. The carbonated swamp warbler  (image below) is one such mystery bird which is known only from his paintings. 
John James Audubon;s birds of America
https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america?sort_by=title
Notes on Audubon's mystery birds
http://www.dvoc.org/CassiniaOnLine/Cassinia70/C70_22_24.pdf
Carbonated swamp warbler
http://tailsofbirding.blogspot.in/2011/02/carbonated-swamp-warbler.html
Among the hundreds of birds drawn and painted by John James Audubon, five “mystery birds” have not been identified or found in nature.
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Fine... Pure... Strong... 
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Dog evolution spurred by climate change 
Ancestors of dogs (sensu lata, referring to all canids from foxes and coyotes to wolves) were small mongoose sized creatures who had an ambush hunting style when North America was covered with thick forests around 40 million years ago. They had forelimbs suitable for pouncing on and grappling with prey (like most cats). As the world cooled, the forests gave way to open habitats and meadows creating spaces for pursuit and the ancestors of dogs evolved to hunt through pursuit. While foxes and coyotes pursue and pounce, wolves have gone all the way by pursuing targets for hours on end. #dogs   #climatechange   #evolution  
Habitat changes and changing predatory habits in North American fossil canids
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150818/ncomms8976/full/ncomms8976.html
Fossil study: Dogs evolved with climate change
http://phys.org/news/2015-08-fossil-dogs-evolved-climate.html
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Piense ( pienso) sin (son) aste (asta) debilies (debiles)
perdon por mi español.
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Occupation
Doctor; Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology
Skills
Rheumatology, Immunology, Statistics, Bird Photography, Google+
Employment
  • SGPGIMS
    Additional Professor, Clinical Immunology, 2011 - present
  • SGPGIMS
    Associate Professor, Clinical Immunology, 2008 - 2011
  • SGPGIMS
    Assistant Professor, Clinical Immunology, 2004 - 2008
  • Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences
    Assistant Professor, Rheumatology and Immunology, 2004 - 2004
  • SGPGIMS
    Specialist Registrar, Clinical Immunology, 2000 - 2003
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Currently
Lucknow
Previously
Kerala - Kozhikode - Chandigarh - Kochi - Thiruvananthapuram
Story
Tagline
Physician, Rheumatologist and Immunologist, Closet Geek, Mad about Birds, Photography,technology, statistics, physics, and food. Wanna be philosopher.
Introduction
Additional Professor, Department of Clinical Immunology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow
Bragging rights
Volunteered for Live vaccine Phase I trial
Education
  • SGPGIMS
    DM Clinical Immunology, 2001 - 2003
  • PGIMER
    MD Internal Medicine, 1997 - 2000
  • Kozhikode Medical College
    MBBS, 1989 - 1995
  • Sainik School Kazhakootam SSKZM
    1982 - 1989
  • St Mary's High School
    1977 - 1982
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Male
Other names
A L Thoppil
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  • Babbel
A very enjoyable experience. Good Bollywood themed entertainment show which you will enjoy more if you know the filmy dialogues and songs from old Hindi films. The Culture gully was also interesting and novel, although it could have been bigger with more regions covered. The Kerala stall was a disappointment, what with the "Boat Bar" ignoring all the good things in Kerala for the Keralites penchant for the small peg.
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Tasty but very spicy. Those who like excessively spicy Indian food would love it though.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Within walking distance of Metro and the Business design center. Breakfast buffet was good. Wifi didnt work
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
We had veal schnitzels and Pig in a blanket. Both awesome.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
30 reviews
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Excellent dinner buffet with good variety. Almost everything is good with a balance of flavors, not overly spicy like other places (Just right). Desserts also good. Avoid over-eating starters. Best eatery in Lucknow at this time
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
It was worth every penny of it. For best value, book online in advance and reach on time. Leave somewhat early, even the London tube can breakdown. (It happened twice during my four days in London).
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Bought two items from their online store. Total fraud. Over several weeks one item still remains pending. The other was totally damaged and they dont have a return policy other than trying to force customers to accept them. They dont even email an order confirmation Their call center does not work. Here is a link to a facebook page of aggrieved customers. Buy at your peril
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago