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American Anthropological Association
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"It’s worse than we thought 10 years ago,” says AAA member Dr. Katie MacKinnon. She and her colleagues identified a number of human activities pushing primates to the edge, such as hunting. http://ow.ly/QGnY308aftx
From gorillas to gibbons, a wide-ranging survey finds that the world’s primates are in steep decline.
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The 2017 COSSA Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day will take place on March 29-30, 2017 in Washington, DC. The 2017 Conference will feature important discussions about social science in the Trump Administration and new Congress and will prepare attendees to take action in support of our work. Come to Washington at this critical time and make your voice heard! http://ow.ly/9N7v307IJvO
Registration for COSSA’s 2017 Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day is now open! The 2017 COSSA Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day will take pla…
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You can find "The 2016 Presidential Election: Anthropologists Reflect on What Just Happened" and other videos from the 2016 AAA Annual Meeting on the AAA YouTube channel: http://ow.ly/oFTH307Wwdy
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Hone your ethnographic sensibility through attention and sensorium training methods developed in visual and dramatic arts, performance, and music at a 6 week undergraduate/graduate field school for Ethnographic Sensibility in Belgrade, Serbia. http://ow.ly/9lzV306KEK1
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Ancient Egyptians buried children and adults in pots. The hollow vessels mirror the womb and may have symbolized a rebirth into the afterlife, scientists report. http://ow.ly/bGdI307IMnj
New research is stirring the pot about an ancient Egyptian burial practice.Many ancient peoples, including Egyptians, buried some of their dead in ceramic pots or urns. Researchers have long thought these pot burials, which often recycled containers used for domestic purposes, were a common, make-do burial for poor children.But at least in ancient Egypt, the practice was not limited to children or to impoverished families, according to a new anal...
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The 2017 COSSA Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day will take place on March 29-30, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Conference brings together more than 100 members of the social and behavioral science community and provides a platform for COSSA members to engage with leaders of federal agencies, Congressional staff, and colleagues from across the science and higher education communities. The 2017 Conference will feature important discussions about social science in the Trump Administration and new Congress and will prepare attendees to take action in support of our work. Come to Washington at this critical time and make your voice heard! http://ow.ly/9N7v307IJvO
Registration for COSSA’s 2017 Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day is now open! The 2017 COSSA Science Policy Conference & Social Science Advocacy Day will take pla…
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But in a major win for the associations that lobby on behalf of research universities, the final rule does not include a provision that was in earlier drafts that would have applied principles of informed consent to biospecimens, such as tissue, blood, saliva and urine. The fight over this issue was particularly intense in involving academics -- with university leaders and many biological scientists opposing the proposed change (and thus happy with Wednesday's outcome). Others, however, including anthropologists, had campaigned for the change. http://ow.ly/cX6A3089MX5
University leaders praise regulation for leaving out provisions on biospecimens opposed by many as too burdensome. Social scientists see some gains for their studies.
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Take a moment to see where your Senators and Congress members stand on Standing Rock. Reach out and thank them for taking action and encourage them to remain vigilant in 2017. If your member has not yet taken action, encourage them to take a stand—especially if they have a record of pro-energy development positions. http://ow.ly/wd1m3089I91
Jerome Whitington and Eben Kirksey In the face of months of protests and legal campaigning, last December the US Army Corps of Engineers reject...
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The Black Lives Matter movement put the issue of contemporary forms of institutional racism and exclusion into the political spotlight. But, how do we know if a police shooting, health disparity, educational achievement gap, or award nomination is the product of racism or simply a unique event? What evidence do we need in order to decide if an action, belief, word, or image is racist? The organizers of “Was that racist?” will discuss their own struggles trying to locate the relevance of race and racism in their ethnographic research. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHQUSs1DdGQ
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Join AAA and the Anacostia Community Museum on January 28 for the first in a series of documentaries focusing on the Latinx experience in America and the sociology and cultural ecology of contemporary urban communities. Chocolate City explores the rapid gentrification of Washington DC through the eyes of a group of local women who are fighting to return to their neighborhood. http://ow.ly/aSJd307Pp7W
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AAA has moved to strengthen its commitment to protecting academic freedom by establishing a Rapid Response Network and activating an affiliation with Scholars At Risk, an international non-profit organization that works to protect threatened scholars and promote academic freedom around the world. http://ow.ly/YaD3307Pak6
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Is getting more exercise one of your New Year's resolutions? Check out the latest piece in AAA member Katie Hejtmanek's series on the culture of strength sports. http://ow.ly/h2br307IVe8
A cultural anthropologist examines the meaning we assign to our fitness methodologies — especially when it comes to groups.
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American Anthropological Association's Collections
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Advancing knowledge. Solving human problems.
Introduction
The American Anthropological Association is the world’s largest association for professional anthropologists, with more than 10,000 members. Based in Washington, DC, the Association was founded in 1902, and covers all four main fields of anthropology (cultural anthropology, biological/physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic anthropology).

While 75% of our members are employed in higher education or are students of anthropology, about 25% of our members work in the public, private, and non-governmental sectors, beyond the academy. The Association is organized into 40 sections, each reflecting specialized domains of knowledge. We publish a portfolio of 22 journals, offer career planning and professional development services, support college and university departments, award numerous prizes and fellowships, sponsor a paid summer internship program, a summer field school in ethnography and occupational therapy, and stage research conferences in the Fall and Spring each year. We also have a public education initiative that highlights the contributions made by anthropological research to important and enduring topics such as race and migration.

The Association is proud to belong to a number of inter-organizational collaborations, including the World Council of Anthropological Associations, the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, the Consortium of Social Science Associations, the National Humanities Alliance, and the American Council of Learned Societies.
Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
703/528-1902
Address
2300 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 1301 Arlington, VA 22201-3357