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AFOSR, Air Force Office of Scientific Research
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Mr. James Fillerup recently hosted the 2016 Multi-Scale Structural Mechanics and Prognosis Program Review at Tec^Edge in Dayton, Ohio. This fundamental basic research program addresses the +United States Air Force needs in the following application areas: 1) New and revolutionary flight structures, 2) Multi-scale modeling and prognosis and 3) Structural dynamics under non-stationary conditions and extreme environments. Other game-changing and revolutionary structural mechanics problems relevant to the U.S. Air Force are also of interest.

Interested in AFOSR funding for your innovative research ideas? Click the link below to learn more. #AirForce   #BasicResearch  
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A team of researchers has developed a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using nitrogen-doped graphene as a substrate. The team expects the new technique will be effective in detecting trace amounts of organic molecules. The research was supported, in part, by MURI grants from ARO and AFOSR PO: Dr. James Fillerup, Multi-Scale Structural Mechanics and Prognosis. Read the full story at http://news.psu.edu/story/418359/2016/07/22/research/ultrasensitive-sensor-using-n-doped-graphene (Image: Terrones Lab/ +Penn State University) #BasicResearch   #MaterialsScience #AFOSRMURI  
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The +United States Air Force mission is to “fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace.” In order to accomplish its mission, the Air Force invests in Systems & Software, which is the keystone of all advanced technology. The Systems & Software program, managed by AFOSR PO Dr. Kathleen Kaplan, actively searches for ideas with respect to two submissions: 1) Improving current AF systems, and; 2) Introducing cutting-edge research to expand the field of knowledge.

We are looking for research that will drastically improve current Air Force systems and help to develop new S&T for the benefit of the nation. To learn more, click the link below or visit our latest BAA on Grants.gov at http://go.usa.gov/xcuJ9 #AirForce   #BasicResearch   #Grants
Description The AF's mission is to “fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace.” In order to accomplish its mission, the AF invests in Systems & Software, which is the keystone of all advanced technology. The Systems & Software program actively searches for ideas with respect to two ...
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AFOSR supported PI Professor James Caverlee is mentioned in a recent article published by Communications of the ACM: “The Rise of Social Bots” at http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2016/7/204021-the-rise-of-social-bots +Texas A&M University #AFOSRYIP  
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Research proposals are sought for the Quantum Electronic Solids program, managed by Dr. Harold Weinstock. This program focuses on materials that exhibit cooperative quantum electronic behavior. The primary emphasis is on superconductors, metamaterials, and on nanoscopic electronic components and devices based upon 2D materials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and other forms of these materials with low power dissipation and the ability to provide denser non-volatile memory, logic and/or sensing elements that have the potential to impact future +United States Air Force electronic systems.

AFOSR's latest BAA (BAA-AFRL-AFOSR-2016-0007) is available on Grants.gov at http://go.usa.gov/xcuJ9 #AirForce   #BasicResearch   #FundingOpportunity   #Grants
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Researchers at Caltech have created one of the smallest reproductions of Vincent van Gogh's “The Starry Night” by using folded DNA to precisely place glowing molecules within microscopic light resonators. The reproduction of "The Starry Night" contains 65,536 pixels and is the width of a dime across. The precision placement of DNA origami could be used to build chip-based devices like computer circuits.

Credit: Ashwin Gopinath/Caltech | The research was supported by AFOSR PO: Dr. Gernot Pomrenke, Optoelectronics and Photonics #nanoscience #origami   #artofscience   #basicresearch  
A technique that allows manmade DNA shapes to be placed wherever desired—to within a margin of error of just 20 nanometers—now removes a major hurdle for the large-scale integration of molecular devices on chips.
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Researchers at the +University of Wisconsin-Madison are finding ways to accelerate the process of making new materials. The research is supported, in part, by AFOSR PO: Dr. John Luginsland, Laser and Optical Physics. #BasicResearch   #MaterialsScience
By simulating substances inside powerful computers, University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers are accelerating the process of making new materials.
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A team of scientists at The University of Texas at Austin used computer simulations to find a possible new source of gamma rays:

"One of the key results that we found is that a laser pulse can be efficiently converted into a beam of very energetic photons. They are more than one million times more energetic than the photons in the laser pulse. Until recently, there hasn't been a method for producing a beam of such energetic photons. So the proposed regime can be groundbreaking for a number of applications and also for fundamental science studies." -Alex Arefiev, #UTAustin  

Gamma ray production could benefit society through brain imaging, cancer therapy, and cargo scanning. +Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) #basicresearch   #physics   #supercomputers
TACC Stampede, Lonestar supercomputers help discover gamma ray creation from lasers
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A KC-46A Pegasus refuels a C-17 Globemaster III during a test flight July 12, 2016. The successful mission tested the hydraulic pressure relief valves installed on the KC-46A to correct higher than expected axial loads in the boom. (Boeing photo/Paul Weatherman)
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Have you ever wondered how your GPS works? Check out AFRL’s new #LabtoLife video to find out.

+Department of Defense +United States Air Force +U.S. Navy +The U.S. Army #GPS  
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We contributed in several critical ways to the GPS program. An early 1960s AFOSR research program resulted in the Code Division Multiple Access System (CDMA) that provided precise ranging and timing data, and allowed all satellites within a constellation to broadcast on the same frequency without interfering with each other. While operating under an AFOSR grant in 1967, Dr. Byron Knowles of +Texas A&M University conceptualized a design for a low cost GPS. In 1973 the results of this GPS design were integrated with other system initiatives, which eventually resulted in the NAVSTAR GPS program. It is significant to note that several other AFOSR programs were essential in making the GPS a viable system: Rudolf E. Kalman’s filtering system permits the routines that determine GPS positioning to update system parameters and to zero in on the correct satellite range and azimuth; Charles Townes’ maser work led to superior atomic clocks integral to the operation of every GPS satellite; additional GPS improvement came from Dr. Steven Chu, whose 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics was rooted in AFOSR program support. Dr. Chu’s efforts to cool and trap atoms with laser light led to a 1000-fold increase in atomic clock accuracy. An improvement of that time standard has ripple effects throughout every precision physics area. #BasicResearch  
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AFOSR PI Professor Panagiotis Artemiadis has developed a system to control multiple robotic drones using the human brain. Artemiadis is the director of the Human-Oriented Robotics and Control Lab and an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering in the School for Engineering of Matter, +Arizona State University, Tempe Campus. To learn more about the research, check out “ASU researcher creates system to control robots with the brain” at https://asunow.asu.edu/20160710-discoveries-asu-researcher-creates-system-control-robots-brain #BasicResearch   #Breakthrough   #Robots  +CBS 5 AZ
An ASU researcher has developed a system to control multiple robots -- potentially hundreds -- with the human brain. “This is something nobody has done before.” (Wednesday, Jul 13, 2016)
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AFOSR’s latest BAA is now available on Grants.gov!

Using a carefully balanced research portfolio, our research managers seek to foster revolutionary scientific breakthroughs enabling the +United States Air Force and U.S. industry to produce world-class, militarily significant, and commercially valuable products. Our focus is on research areas that offer significant and comprehensive benefits to our national warfighting and peacekeeping capabilities. These areas are organized and managed in two scientific Branches: Engineering and Information Sciences (RTA) and Physical and Biological Sciences (RTB).

Interested in funding for your innovative research ideas? Visit the latest BAA (BAA-AFRL-AFOSR-2016-0007) at http://go.usa.gov/xcuJ9 to learn more. #AirForce   #BasicResearch  
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In their circles
436 people
Have them in circles
647 people
Robert Westin's profile photo
Jacknjewel's profile photo
Rickard Specialty Metals & Engineering's profile photo
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Douglas Hernández's profile photo
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's profile photo
ssegawa musa's profile photo
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We discover, shape and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future Air Force.
Introduction
Welcome to the official Google+ page of AFOSR. We discover, shape and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future Air Force.
 
For sixty years, AFOSR has forged the foundations of science in every mission critical area for today’s Air Force, from integrated circuits, lasers, and stealth to anti-missile defense systems, hypersonics, and space travel. AFOSR personnel do not dream about what is possible—we accomplish what many believe is impossible. We focus on the science of the future today; enabling a future Air Force that will be far more technologically advanced than any peer.