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AFOSR, Air Force Office of Scientific Research
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Researchers from +Rice University and +Baylor College of Medicine have taken inspiration from the human brain in creating a new “deep learning” method. The research was supported, in part, by AFOSR PO: Dr. Richard Riecken, Science of Information, Computation, Learning, and Fusion, Professor Richard Baraniuk #DeepLearning   #Neuroscience   #ArtificialIntelligence   #AI   #BasicResearch
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+David Amerland +Oleg Moskalensky​
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Today we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and his legacy.

“Life's most persistent and urgent question is, 'What are you doing for others?” – Martin Luther King Jr

#MLKday   #NationalDayofService  
https://www.nationalservice.gov/mlkday
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Engineers from +Washington University in St. Louis and the Air Force Research Laboratory have developed new nanoparticle technology that eliminates the need for cold storage in some medical diagnostic tests. The research is supported by AFOSR PO: Dr. William Roach, Natural Materials, Systems, and Extremophiles, the 711th Human Performance Wing, and the +National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Read the full story at https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Storing-and-testing-at-any-temperature.aspx

#BasicResearch #BioSensors #MaterialsScience
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“Discovering something unexpected is always extremely interesting for physicists. This opens a whole new realm of physics.” - Professor Matthias Fuchs +University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Fuchs received an AFOSR Young Investigator Award in 2015 to further his X-ray research. His research is supported by Dr. Riq Parra, Ultrashort Pulse Laser-Matter Interactions. #AFOSRYIP   #BasicResearch   #Physics   #ArtofScience
What happens when you focus X-ray beams a billion times stronger than the sun's brightness on a spot 100 times smaller than a human hair? A startling discovery that could lead the way to engineering better materials. That, and it's just cool, said UNL physicist Matthias Fuchs, who led the project.
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Researchers at +Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) present a way to make atom interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates more precise. Atom interferometry is one of the most promising new technologies for precision inertial navigation without GPS.

The research is supported, in part, by AFOSR PO: Dr. Tatjana Curcic, Quantum Electronic Solids, PI: Professor Wolfgang Ketterle. #BasicResearch   #Physics   #QuantumMechanics   #Navigation   #AtomicPhysics
New atom interferometer could measure inertial forces with record-setting accuracy.
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Thank you for following AFOSR in 2016! We look forward to sharing more stories about science, basic research, funding opportunities, and the +United States Air Force with you in 2017. #HappyNewYear   #NewYear2017   #BasicResearch
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Researchers at the +National Institute of Standards and Technology  have used a laser to make a macroscopic mechanical object colder than ever before.

“No matter what we’re doing next with this research, this is now something we can keep in our bag of tricks to let us always start with a colder and quieter and better device that will help with whatever science we’re trying to do.” - Dr. John Teufel, physicist at NIST

#BasicResearch   #QuantumMechanics   #STEM   #Science  
Scientists just supercooled an object beyond the quantum limit.
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Researchers at the +University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are developing self-healing materials. The research is supported, in part, by AFOSR PO: Dr. Les Lee, Mechanics of Multifunctional Materials and Microsystems. PI: Dr. Scott White +Aerospace Engineering at Illinois  #BasicResearch   #Autonomous   #MaterialsScience
Researchers at the University of Illinois are developing materials that can heal themselves.
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#ThrowbackThursday Mach Meter Design (1953-1958)

With the advent of the Century series (F-100 to F-106) aircraft, Mach 1+ speeds adversely affected the accuracy of conventional airspeed indicators. AFOSR-funded research programs at several institutions (Princeton University (co-funded with Office of Naval Research), Cornell University and the Aerospace Research Laboratory), solved the problem through research on the interaction between shock waves created by supersonic flight and the boundary layer of air that formed between the surface of the aircraft and the free air stream flowing past the aircraft. A blunt body shape placed in the flow field ahead of the fuselage results in a more accurate airspeed indication. The Aeronautical Research Laboratories designed Mach meter indicators using this principle were employed on the Century series, as well as the YF12A-later designated as the SR- 71. #AirForce   #BasicResearch   #TBT

Photo: +Lockheed Martin YF-12A at the +National Museum of the U.S. Air Force (+United States Air Force  Unit photo by Don Popp)
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Dr. Irene Kochevar and her breakthrough research in photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is highlighted in episode eight of the White Rabbit Project on Netflix (Season 1: Episode 8 "Where's My Hoverboard?" at ~25:00).

Pioneered by Dr. Irene Kochevar and Dr. Robert Redmond, +Harvard Medical School professors and +Massachusetts General Hospital Wellman Center researchers, PTB, which can replace conventional sutures, staples and glues in repairing skin wounds and surgical incisions, reconnects severed peripheral nerves, blood vessels and tendons, as well as incisions in the cornea. The research was supported, in part, by AFOSR PO Dr. Howard Schlossberg, Laser and Optical Physics, PI: Dr. Richard Rox Anderson, through the DOD medical program, variously called the Medical Free Electron Laser Program, then the Military Photomedicine Program, and now the Military Medical Photonics Program, supported by AFOSR PO: Dr. Patrick Bradshaw, Human Performance and Biosystems. #AirForce   #BasicResearch   #STEM
Kari Byron, Tory Belleci and Grant Imahara rank history's greatest inventions, heists and more in th...
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#ThrowbackThursday Excimer Laser Lithography (1980-1985)

In the early 1980’s, pioneering research was done on the use of excimer lasers for lithographic patterning of microelectronic chips, by Kanti Jain of +IBM and Daniel Ehrlich of M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory, the latter funded by AFOSR Program Manager, Howard Schlossberg. In 1985 Ehrlich, with AFOSR funding, demonstrated projection writing of lines with an argon Fluoride (ArF) laser, with a resolution of 130 nanometers, in diamond-like carbon films. This breakthrough demonstration led to large programs by +DARPA and others aimed at building an infrastructure for excimer laser projection lithography. As late as 1987, in a review article by Ehrlich, with Mordechai Rothschild, excimer laser lithography was described as speculative, with important problems yet unresolved. Subsequent advances have made ArF projection lithography the standard, by which all of the world’s micro-chips are produced. The ArF laser is unique for this purpose as it emits considerable radiation at a very short wavelength (193 nanometers), necessary for the very small feature size of modern chips. #AirForce   #BasicResearch   #TBT
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Research by JILA physicists could lead to the creation of new materials for applications such as “spintronic” devices and quantum computers:

“By using our atomic clock for quantum simulation, we hope to stimulate new insights and shed new light on emerging behaviors of topological systems that are useful for robust quantum information processing and spintronics.” - +National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)/JILA Fellow Jun Ye

The research is supported, in part, by AFOSR PO Dr. Tatjana Curcic, Atomic and Molecular Physics. #BasicResearch   #quantumphysics   #quantumcomputing  
Using their advanced atomic clock to mimic other desirable quantum systems, JILA physicists have caused atoms in a gas to behave as if they possess unusual magnetic properties long sought in harder-to-study solid materials. Representing a novel “off-label” use for atomic clocks, the research could lead to the creation of new materials for applications such as “spintronic”
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We discover, shape and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future Air Force.
Introduction
Welcome to the official Google+ page of AFOSR. We discover, shape and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future Air Force.
 
For sixty years, AFOSR has forged the foundations of science in every mission critical area for today’s Air Force, from integrated circuits, lasers, and stealth to anti-missile defense systems, hypersonics, and space travel. AFOSR personnel do not dream about what is possible—we accomplish what many believe is impossible. We focus on the science of the future today; enabling a future Air Force that will be far more technologically advanced than any peer.
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