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KeepingChickens
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Keeping Chickens Newsletter - Free Online Magazine
Keeping Chickens Newsletter - Free Online Magazine

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The chickens have the goats well-trained at Rikki's Refuge.
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Could this be the first music video to star chickens and ducks? :-)

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A chicken with attitude...
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The Poultry Yard by H. Y. Carpenter

The poultry yard — if we have one and I hope we have. A yard for the hens which is neither too sunny or too shady is a fine thing for fowls. If there be no natural made, some kind of artificial shade should be provided, even if it be nothing more than old feed sacks fastened to the fence. But the important thing with a yard is keeping it clean and the soil loose so that the hens may scratch in it. A hard packed yard may be better than none, but the usefulness of the space may be increased one hundred per cent by keeping the ground clean and well spaded.

One of the greatest mistakes in connection with a yard is to throw table scraps, corn husks, lawn clippings etc., on the ground. Table scraps should be fed in a trough or an old pan, while the place for corn husks and lawn clippings is inside the house. What is not eaten then serves as litter and cannot become obnoxious as when thrown in the yard. Some of the lawn clippings will be eaten but usually not all, while the birds will eat little if any of the corn husks. If these have been fed in the yard, the leavings soon become matted down, particularly if there has been a rain or two. The next time the yard is spaded this is turned under. Upon spading again this refuse comes to the surface, sour and ill-smelling; in fact, extremely nauseating. To avoid this, let such things be fed in pans or troughs, or else inside the coop. Before we spade our yard let us scrape it with a hoe or a scraper, removing what refuse and droppings there may be. Then we may spade the yard and not turn under anything that will decay. A yard is a grand thing for the fowls, but unless properly cared for may be of little actual value and even seriously objectionable.

Likewise our coops may be the subject of our neighbors' criticism. If we keep no male birds, one cause for complaint — that of early morning crowing — has been eliminated. But it is of the greatest importance that we keep our poultry yard and poultry house clean and free from odor. We should do that for ourselves and our hens, even though we would not care for our neighbors. It must not be forgotten that many cities and towns have ordinances regulating the keeping of chickens, even forbidding them within certain districts. The complaint of a single neighbor may bring us a peck of trouble and may result in our having to discontinue our backlot enterprise entirely. But if we will give our yard and coop the attention they deserve, it will be to our own interest as well as that of our birds and will give our neighbors no cause for complaint.

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