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Carl Zimmer
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Carl Zimmer

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Now for a little natural genetic modification of embryos...our ancestors got infected with viruses that now take up 8 percent of our genome. And some of them may wake up again at the earliest stages of development--perhaps protecting embryos from infection from other viruses. Freaky? You bet. But possibly true. Here's my column for The New York Times​ on the research. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/23/science/ancient-viruses-once-foes-may-now-serve-as-friends.html?_r=0&referrer=
So-called endogenous retroviruses may help guide embryonic development and defend young cells from infections by other viruses.
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Has evolution helped make the Dutch the tallest people on Earth? I look at the evidence in my column this week in The New York Times​ http://t.co/iHyOfmdx3s
A new study from the Netherlands suggests evolution favors taller people.
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Paul, do this, go to a major university teaching hospital, ask for a full psych evaluation. Share the results here.
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For my latest column for The New York Times​, an ode to the essential, peculiar diaphragm muscle http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/07/science/behind-each-breath-an-underappreciated-muscle-the-diaphragm.html
Researchers have developed new tools that give a glimpse into how the muscle that helps every mammal breathe, the diaphragm, develops.
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Scientists in Iceland can now look at the entire country's genomes to find disease-related genes. I look at this project in my new column for The New York Times​ http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/26/science/in-icelands-dna-clues-to-what-genes-may-cause-disease.html
The results uncovered a host of previously unknown gene mutations that may play roles in ailments as diverse as Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and gallstones.
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Wow -- how "open" are these data?
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Darwin in your kitchen: in my latest column for The New York Times​, I look at the evolution of the indoor biome http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/science/the-next-frontier-the-great-indoors.html
As cities and suburbs have spread across continents, the amount of indoor shelter has exploded — and given ecologists a new field of study: the indoor biome.
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Funny
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New on the Loom: A whale on the wrong side of the world. http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/10/whales-on-the-wrong-side-of-the-world/
In May 2010, a whale showed up on the wrong side of the world. A team of marine biologists was conducting a survey off the coast of Israel when they spotted it. At first they thought it was a sperm...
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Mbuh ra ngerti q lah!!!
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Carl Zimmer

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Here’s an explainer I wrote about today’s big news on editing human embryos. http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/22/editing-human-embryos-so-this-happened/
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I'm not sure how I feel about this.  Also, I did have to search for what CRISPR stands for:   clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats
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New on the Loom! The day Darwin stepped into a cage with an orangutan. http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/21/when-darwin-met-another-ape/
On March 28, 1838, Charles Darwin paid a visit to the London Zoo. At age 29, he was far from the scientific celebrity he would eventually become. It had only been two years since his return from hi...
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+brucecrummy2
You said it germs adapt every year not evolve they adapt
Finches in Darwins experiment were all adaptations into their new environment, they are still finches just like different dogs are still dogs.
There is no evidence of fruit flies evolving, they either mutate and die or mutate and cant fly (abnormalities). Again you say fruit flies are adapting.
You seem to confuse EVOLUTION for ADAPTATION,

So there you go according to your own criteria ive disproved evolution.
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Are allergies actually good for us? Here's a profile I've written for Mosaic Science​ of Ruslan Medzhitov, one of the world's greatest immunologists. He thinks the answer is yes. http://mosaicscience.com/story/why-do-we-have-allergies
Allergies such as peanut allergy and hay fever make millions of us miserable, but scientists aren’t even sure why they exist. Carl Zimmer talks to a master immunologist with a controversial answer.
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I have 2 theories. The first one is that now in days we're falling behind in evolution we're more clean, we spend less time outside and we have change our diets. The second theory could be that allergies could be a undetected virus or bacteria changing our DNA. Pick your answer? 
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New on the Loom: Lemon-scented malaria? A weird possibility 1.3 billion years in the making http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/24/lemon-scented-malaria/
Parasites are life's great success story, abundant in both species and sheer numbers. One secret to their success is the ability that many parasites have to manipulate their hosts. By pulling strin...
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Epigenesis of what we were discussing before thank you 
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Arsenic, mummies, natural selection in humans, and the driest place on Earth. All in my New York Times​ column this week!  http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/13/science/an-unlikely-driver-of-evolution-arsenic.html
A new study suggests that people who live in the Atacama Desert are more resistant to arsenic than other people, thanks to natural selection.
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Furthermore naphthaline if we are on this morbid road to soul ripper mania 
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Can gene therapy succeed where conventional vaccines fall short? In The New York Times​ I look at a method called "immunoprophylaxis by gene transfer" that's showing promising signs of working against diseases including HIV and malaria. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/10/health/protection-without-a-vaccine.html?ref=health
In developing a new type of artificial gene therapy, scientists hope to engineer the body to resist several diseases.
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Protection without vaccine. I would assume divide the statistics into 3 experimental groups, and consider the heat a factor for protection without vaccine.
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I write about science, in books, articles, and blogs. I am a columnist at the New York Times, and I also write features for magazines such as National Geographic, Wired, and Scientific American. You can find out more about my books here. And here's a recent video where I explain why we live on a planet of viruses.  
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I am, to my knowledge, the only writer for whom a species of tapeworm has been named. (Details here: http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2009/07/08/a-tapeworm-to-call-my-own/ )
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Carl Zimmer's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Has Hit - HuffPost Live
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Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus is making waves for its controversial name, as well as its deadly impact. Is this just another

Smithsonian Magazine
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Recently named "most interesting" magazine

De-Extinction: Just Around The Corner?
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We may soon have to reclassify extinction, according to a new report in National Geographic Magazine. Some species may only be “bodily extin

PLoS ONE: Broad Phylogenomic Sampling and the Sister Lineage of Land Plants
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PLoS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies

CarlZimmer.com: Articles
carlzimmer.com - written by Carl Zimmer

2011. A Body Fit for a FreakyBig Brain. Discover JulyAugust 2011. Link In 1758 the Swedish taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus dubbed our species Homo sapiens Latin

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

Scared? Nah, just busy | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Evolution | On my first full day blogging at Discover, things are a bit chaotic, but I'd be remiss not to take a second to observe the 150th anniversary of

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

Ducks Meet the Culture Wars
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com

A few days ago, CNS News (“The right news. Right now.”) discovered that the National Science Foundation has …

Monday, Tuesday: New Haven, New York | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

A Planet of Viruses | On Monday, I'll be speaking at a master's tea at Morse College at Yale at 4 pm about outbreaks--real and fictionalized, viral and

Soul-Made-Flesh-A-Thon: A Sale to Clear Out the Brain | The Loom | Disco...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Book sale! | Thanks to everyone who scooped up autographed copies of At the Water's Edge (72 are out the door as of this writing, and 8 are left). My shelves

Carl Zimmer - Viruses and Other Little Things | Point of Inquiry
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Carl Zimmer - Viruses and Other Little Things. February 4, 2013. Host: Indre Viskontas. This year's flu season has been dubbed the worst in

It Was Foretold Long Ago… | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

General | Allow me to introduce myself by way of a homecoming.It was at Discover that I started writing about science, a couple years out of college and with no

Serotonin | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Science Tattoo Emporium | chemistry tattoos | Here is a picture of my serotonin tattoo. I don't know that it needs much more explanation than it's my favorite

How many species are there? My latest for the New York Times | The Loom ...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Top posts | In 1833, John Obadiah Westwood, a British entomologist, tried to guess how many species of insects there are on Earth. He extrapolated from England

We Beasties
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"Gentlemen, it is the microbes that will have the last word." - Louis Pasteur

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

On Slate–Contagion: A dialogue about movies, viruses, and reasonable fea...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

A Planet of Viruses | Last year, while I was working on a profile for the New York Times of a virus hunter named Ian Lipkin, he told me he was consulting on a

Science Ink: I want your skin! [Science Tattoo] | The Loom | Discover Ma...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Science Tattoo Emporium | Melinda writes,I have attached a photo of my Dirac Equation tattoo, which I obtained a few months ago. I am really happy with it. In

The Mere Existence of Whales | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Evolution | Strictly speaking, there should be no blue whales.Blue whales can weigh over a thousand times more than a human being. That's a lot of extra cells