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Carl Zimmer
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Carl Zimmer

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Radiolab​ ran an experiment for their latest podcast: it's just a long studio palaver between me, Jad Abumrad​ & Robert Krulwich​ about giant viruses & what they mean for life itself--without any of their trademark lightning edits. It's more like Marc Maron for microbiology instead of comedy. Thankfully, they let me fact-check myself at the end. 
The definition of life is in flux, complexity is overrated, and humans are shrinking.
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w00t! The second edition of Evolution: Making Sense of Life, which I wrote with Doug Emlen​, is out. Here's the cover, featuring Darwin's moth. http://www.amazon.com/Evolution-Study-Guide-PACKAGE-Making/dp/1936221551/ref=pd_sim_sbs_14_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=1SJMKZ3BFSB2A9P0NF3Z
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Textbooks are so expensive now.  Sometimes I order "preview" copies from companies and dream that my district might actually buy ones for my students.  Never happens.     
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Here's a brief guide to explaining science that I wrote for The Open Notebook​ http://www.theopennotebook.com/2015/07/07/zimmers-guide-to-explainers
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I think we need "The Tweet Semester: lectures in 140 characters or fewer".
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Scientists have retrieved the 8500-year-old genome of Kennewick Man. I write in the New York Times about what his DNA tells us about the peopling of the New World. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/19/science/new-dna-results-show-kennewick-man-was-native-american.html
A new analysis, published in Nature, refutes the theory that the 8,500-year-old skeleton was a European. Instead, he was related to contemporary Native Americans.
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Thank you my apple watch is cheating on me carving calories out under my nose 
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Here's a disturbing mystery. The saiga is an Asian species of antelope with a face drawn by Dr. Seuss. In the past two weeks, over a third of the entire species has dropped dead of an unknown disease--possibly opportunistic infections taking advantage of weakened animals. I talked to saiga experts about this distressing outbreak for a story in The New York Times​ 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/02/science/saiga-antelope-mystery-disease-die-off.html
In the past two weeks, more than third of all saigas have been killed, conservationists have found, and the cause of the outbreak is unknown.
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Products of chemical transformation of fuel rocket!
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New on the Loom: Kangaroos sometimes adopt babies (a k a joeys). Scientists think it's an example of evolution's far-from-perfect powers.
http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/27/the-mystery-of-kangaroo-adoptions/
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Carl Zimmer

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If a deadly fungus arrives in North America, our hundreds of salamander species could be in big trouble. See my latest column in The New York Times​ for more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/science/importing-both-salamanders-and-their-potential-destruction.html
A recently discovered fungus is killing salamanders in Europe and could spread to North America, carried by the pet trade.
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Not good
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For my latest column in The New York Times​ I write about "brain nets." Joining brains of animals together let them do things better than they can on their own. Not quite the Borg, but spooky nonetheless. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/14/science/scientists-demonstrate-animal-mind-melds.html?_r=1
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Thank you I like the DNA hand shake they implemented although science fiction one would need 1 master node to Sample a single DNS or DNA in Humans the Series on AMC. Cells are depicted individually however what we have learned from Physics and Astronomy Van Allen Belts for example on a macro scale the correlate in the micro scale is the nodes reuptake of neurotransmitters that fill the gap. When an AI equivalent of that is considered the synthetic AI can decipher from incomplete biological input and restore the initial donor.
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Neuroscientists have identified a new condition with an awesome name: aphantasia. It's the lack of a mind's eye. My little piece of the story: A piece I wrote five years ago helped the scientists find enough aphantasaics to study. So how well do you see mental images?
Aphantasia, the inability to summon up mental images, is a little-known condition on the verge of wider study.
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Could this be the cause of some learning disabilities? Im horrible at algebra.
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Are you Yamnaya? If you're European, chances are you've got some DNA from these mysterious Bronze Age nomads. I take a look at new genetic histories of Europe in my latest column for The New York Times​ http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/16/science/dna-deciphers-roots-of-modern-europeans.html
The results of two DNA studies indicate that today’s Europeans descend from three groups of people who moved into Europe at different stages of history.
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Very interesting
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New on the Loom: Save the soul-sucking zombie-makers! http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/05/28/save-the-zombie-makers/
Parasites may seem too gross or too wicked to be worth saving from extinction. Or they may just seem so skilled in their sinister arts that we don't have to worry about them, since they'll always f...
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creppy
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The ocean is home to 10000000000000000000000000000000 viruses. In Quanta Magazine​ I write about a worldwide expedition scientists took to catalog their species and start figuring out what effect they have on the biosphere. https://www.quantamagazine.org/20150521-ocean-viruses
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Great discovery, fine article.  There must be vastly more kinds of bacteria in the sunlit ocean than there are-evidently- kinds of viruses, which raises the question: why?
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I write about science, in books, articles, and blogs. I am a columnist at the New York Times, and I also write features for magazines such as National Geographic, Wired, and Scientific American. You can find out more about my books here. And here's a recent video where I explain why we live on a planet of viruses.  
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I am, to my knowledge, the only writer for whom a species of tapeworm has been named. (Details here: http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2009/07/08/a-tapeworm-to-call-my-own/ )
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Carl Zimmer's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Has Hit - HuffPost Live
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Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus is making waves for its controversial name, as well as its deadly impact. Is this just another

Smithsonian Magazine
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Recently named "most interesting" magazine

De-Extinction: Just Around The Corner?
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We may soon have to reclassify extinction, according to a new report in National Geographic Magazine. Some species may only be “bodily extin

PLoS ONE: Broad Phylogenomic Sampling and the Sister Lineage of Land Plants
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PLoS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies

CarlZimmer.com: Articles
carlzimmer.com - written by Carl Zimmer

2011. A Body Fit for a FreakyBig Brain. Discover JulyAugust 2011. Link In 1758 the Swedish taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus dubbed our species Homo sapiens Latin

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

Scared? Nah, just busy | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Evolution | On my first full day blogging at Discover, things are a bit chaotic, but I'd be remiss not to take a second to observe the 150th anniversary of

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

Ducks Meet the Culture Wars
phenomena.nationalgeographic.com

A few days ago, CNS News (“The right news. Right now.”) discovered that the National Science Foundation has …

Monday, Tuesday: New Haven, New York | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

A Planet of Viruses | On Monday, I'll be speaking at a master's tea at Morse College at Yale at 4 pm about outbreaks--real and fictionalized, viral and

Soul-Made-Flesh-A-Thon: A Sale to Clear Out the Brain | The Loom | Disco...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Book sale! | Thanks to everyone who scooped up autographed copies of At the Water's Edge (72 are out the door as of this writing, and 8 are left). My shelves

Carl Zimmer - Viruses and Other Little Things | Point of Inquiry
www.pointofinquiry.org

Carl Zimmer - Viruses and Other Little Things. February 4, 2013. Host: Indre Viskontas. This year's flu season has been dubbed the worst in

It Was Foretold Long Ago… | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

General | Allow me to introduce myself by way of a homecoming.It was at Discover that I started writing about science, a couple years out of college and with no

Serotonin | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Science Tattoo Emporium | chemistry tattoos | Here is a picture of my serotonin tattoo. I don't know that it needs much more explanation than it's my favorite

How many species are there? My latest for the New York Times | The Loom ...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Top posts | In 1833, John Obadiah Westwood, a British entomologist, tried to guess how many species of insects there are on Earth. He extrapolated from England

We Beasties
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"Gentlemen, it is the microbes that will have the last word." - Louis Pasteur

The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Facebook; Twitter; Newsletter. SEARCH. Health & Medicine · Mind & Brain · Technology · Space · Human Origins · Living World · Environment · Physics & Math ...

On Slate–Contagion: A dialogue about movies, viruses, and reasonable fea...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

A Planet of Viruses | Last year, while I was working on a profile for the New York Times of a virus hunter named Ian Lipkin, he told me he was consulting on a

Science Ink: I want your skin! [Science Tattoo] | The Loom | Discover Ma...
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Science Tattoo Emporium | Melinda writes,I have attached a photo of my Dirac Equation tattoo, which I obtained a few months ago. I am really happy with it. In

The Mere Existence of Whales | The Loom | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com - written by Carl Zimmer

Evolution | Strictly speaking, there should be no blue whales.Blue whales can weigh over a thousand times more than a human being. That's a lot of extra cells